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March 12, 2006
Wednesday, March 15

Materials:
Best Nonfiction: 1-17

Handouts:
Anticipation Guide for Cyberspace
Night Writes for the rest of March

Warm Up:
What are the elements in a nonfiction writing piece?

Activity 1:
Students will share their responses on Anticipation Guide for Cyberspace with their table group.

Activity 2:
Students will skim “Where Is Cyberspace?” to review the information. In table groups students will complete the “Review and Interpretation” on the story.

Activity 3:
Students will read Best Nonfiction: 13-15 and discuss “Purpose” and “Audience” of this nonfiction piece of writing. In table groups students will answer the questions in Exercise 1 on pages 15 and 16.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Night Write: March Night Writes

1. Select a topic that you already have a great deal of knowledge or have recently researched.
2. Write a few sentences that describe your audience and your purpose for writing. Do you want to address people who share your enthusiasm for your chosen topic or those who are unfamiliar with it? Do you want to inform, persuade, or entertain?
3. What is the approximate age of your intended audience?
4. Use a concept map, or web, to organize your ideas about your topic. Write your topic in the center square. Then add the subtopics (key words from your research paper) you wrote questions about in the introductory writing exercise. These subtopics should answer the most basic questions that your readers might have about your topic. Add any new subtopics you now think belong there.
5. Save your notes and your concept map for your next required writing piece.


Materials:
Best Nonfiction: 1-17

Handouts:
Anticipation Guide for Cyberspace
Night Writes for the rest of March

Warm Up:
What are the elements in a nonfiction writing piece?

Activity 1:
Students will share their responses on Anticipation Guide for Cyberspace with their table group.

Activity 2:
Students will skim “Where Is Cyberspace?” to review the information. In table groups students will complete the “Review and Interpretation” on the story.

Activity 3:
Students will read Best Nonfiction: 13-15 and discuss “Purpose” and “Audience” of this nonfiction piece of writing. In table groups students will answer the questions in Exercise 1 on pages 15 and 16.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Night Write:
1. Select a topic that you already have a great deal of knowledge or have recently researched.
2. Write a few sentences that describe your audience and your purpose for writing. Do you want to address people who share your enthusiasm for your chosen topic or those who are unfamiliar with it? Do you want to inform, persuade, or entertain?
3. What is the approximate age of your intended audience?
4. Use a concept map, or web, to organize your ideas about your topic. Write your topic in the center square. Then add the subtopics (key words from your research paper) you wrote questions about in the introductory writing exercise. These subtopics should answer the most basic questions that your readers might have about your topic. Add any new subtopics you now think belong there.
5. Save your notes and your concept map for your next required writing piece.


Materials:
Best Nonfiction: 1-17

Handouts:
Anticipation Guide for Cyberspace
Night Writes for the rest of March

Warm Up:
What are the elements in a nonfiction writing piece?

Activity 1:
Students will share their responses on Anticipation Guide for Cyberspace with their table group.

Activity 2:
Students will skim “Where Is Cyberspace?” to review the information. In table groups students will complete the “Review and Interpretation” on the story.

Activity 3:
Students will read Best Nonfiction: 13-15 and discuss “Purpose” and “Audience” of this nonfiction piece of writing. In table groups students will answer the questions in Exercise 1 on pages 15 and 16.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Night Write:
1. Select a topic that you already have a great deal of knowledge or have recently researched.
2. Write a few sentences that describe your audience and your purpose for writing. Do you want to address people who share your enthusiasm for your chosen topic or those who are unfamiliar with it? Do you want to inform, persuade, or entertain?
3. What is the approximate age of your intended audience?
4. Use a concept map, or web, to organize your ideas about your topic. Write your topic in the center square. Then add the subtopics (key words from your research paper) you wrote questions about in the introductory writing exercise. These subtopics should answer the most basic questions that your readers might have about your topic. Add any new subtopics you now think belong there.
5. Save your notes and your concept map for your next required writing piece.


Materials:
Best Nonfiction: 1-17

Handouts:
Anticipation Guide for Cyberspace
Night Writes for the rest of March

Warm Up:
What are the elements in a nonfiction writing piece?

Activity 1:
Students will share their responses on Anticipation Guide for Cyberspace with their table group.

Activity 2:
Students will skim “Where Is Cyberspace?” to review the information. In table groups students will complete the “Review and Interpretation” on the story.

Activity 3:
Students will read Best Nonfiction: 13-15 and discuss “Purpose” and “Audience” of this nonfiction piece of writing. In table groups students will answer the questions in Exercise 1 on pages 15 and 16.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Night Write:
1. Select a topic that you already have a great deal of knowledge or have recently researched.
2. Write a few sentences that describe your audience and your purpose for writing. Do you want to address people who share your enthusiasm for your chosen topic or those who are unfamiliar with it? Do you want to inform, persuade, or entertain?
3. What is the approximate age of your intended audience?
4. Use a concept map, or web, to organize your ideas about your topic. Write your topic in the center square. Then add the subtopics (key words from your research paper) you wrote questions about in the introductory writing exercise. These subtopics should answer the most basic questions that your readers might have about your topic. Add any new subtopics you now think belong there.
5. Save your notes and your concept map for your next required writing piece.

Handouts:
Anticipation Guide for Cyberspace
Night Writes for the rest of March

Warm Up:
What are the elements in a nonfiction writing piece?

Activity 1:
Students will share their responses on Anticipation Guide for Cyberspace with their table group.

Activity 2:
Students will skim “Where Is Cyberspace?” to review the information. In table groups students will complete the “Review and Interpretation” on the story.

Activity 3:
Students will read Best Nonfiction: 13-15 and discuss “Purpose” and “Audience” of this nonfiction piece of writing. In table groups students will answer the questions in Exercise 1 on pages 15 and 16.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Night Write:
1. Select a topic that you already have a great deal of knowledge or have recently researched.
2. Write a few sentences that describe your audience and your purpose for writing. Do you want to address people who share your enthusiasm for your chosen topic or those who are unfamiliar with it? Do you want to inform, persuade, or entertain?
3. What is the approximate age of your intended audience?
4. Use a concept map, or web, to organize your ideas about your topic. Write your topic in the center square. Then add the subtopics (key words from your research paper) you wrote questions about in the introductory writing exercise. These subtopics should answer the most basic questions that your readers might have about your topic. Add any new subtopics you now think belong there.
5. Save your notes and your concept map for your next required writing piece.

Posted by Mrs. Abrams

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