Making Learning Irresitable for Over 25 Years. Making Learning Irresitable for Over 25 Years.
Monday, May 21, 2007

Writing and Grammar texts were collected today.
Literature texts were collected today.

All graded papers have been returned at this time.
Students who have a D or F were given a progress report today.

posted on: May 21, 2007

Friday, May 18, 2007

Warm Up:
On a scale of 1-10, with 10 being the highest, how would you rate Rod Serling’s “ The may 11 on Maple Street” Act 1? Explain.

Reading:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log.

Night Write:
Who are the "monsters" on Maple Street?
Do you believe people are usually treated as if they are innocent until proven guilty? Explain.


Activity 1:
Go over the Night Write: How do the people on Maple Street single out Les Goodman? What qualities of his cause the reaction? What does this really suggest what is happening on Maple Street?


Activity 2:
Students are to read the bracketed text silently. What perspective is created during the opening of Act II?
Prediction: Do you predict that the neighbors watching the Goodman house will or will not discover anything suspicious? Explain.
Students will read page 676 silently.

Activity 3:
So far the suspicion has been cast on Goodman.
Prediction: Do you predict the suspicion will end with Goodman? Why or why not?
Students will read page 677 silently.
What does Don reveal about Steve to their neighbors?

What is the tone of Steve’s speech?

What type of conflict does Steve’s tone suggest?

Activity 4:
Students will read pg. 678-679 silently to find the answer to the following:
How do Don’s actions advance the plot to the climax?

What happens to the dark figure that is walking down Maple Street?

Prediction: Is the dark figure an alien?

Activity 5:
Read the 1st twelve lines on page and describe the atmosphere.

Prediction:
What do you think will happen next on Maple Street?

Students will read the rest of pg. 682 silently.

Activity 6:
Students are to read the 1st eight lines on page 683. Turn to pg. 667 and reread the opening camera shot of Maple Street. Compare the way the viewer first sees Maple Street and the way it appears now.
Students will read the rest of pg. 683-684 silently to find out who is watching what is happening on Maple Street?
Where are they watching from?

Students will turn in their handouts.

posted on: May 10, 2007

Thursday, May 17, 2007

Warm Up:
What are the 1st signs that something strange is happening on Maple Street? How do these signs initiate the conflict on Maple Street?

Reading:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log.


Night Write:
How do the people on Maple Street single out Les Goodman? What qualities of his cause the reaction? What does this really suggest what is happening on Maple Street?

Activity 1:
Share the Night Write responses with the students at the table. Share the responses to the warm up, too.

Activity 2:
Review the key events in the play so far. Students are to read the 1st twenty lines of the play on pg. 672 to make the following prediction:
How do you think Tommy will fare in the face of the crowd’s growing irritation with him?

Activity 3:
Students will read the 2nd half of pg. 672 to determine what hint does Steve’s comment give about how characters will react later in the play?

Activity 4:
Students will read the 1st half of pg. 673 to determine what forces are in conflict now? How has the nature the conflict changed?
Read the 2nd half of pg. 673 to determine what happens to Goodman’s car?

Activity 5:
Read the bracketed stage directions aloud. Ask students to paraphrase the main idea of this passage. Read the rest of pg. 674 and page 675 to answer the following:
Why is the problem with Les Goodman considered part of the rising action of the plot?
What does Charlie accuse Goodman of?

Students will turn in their handouts.


posted on: May 10, 2007

Wednesday, May 16, 2007

Warm Up:
What are the 1st signs that something strange is happening on Maple Street? How do these signs initiate the conflict on Maple Street?

Reading:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log.
Night Write:
How do the people on Maple Street single out Les Goodman? What qualities of his cause the reaction? What does this really suggest what is happening on Maple Street?

Activity 1:
Share the responses to the warm up at the tables and a few to the whole class..

Activity 2:
Review the key events in the play so far. Students are to read the 1st twenty lines of the play on pg. 672 to make the following prediction:
How do you think Tommy will fare in the face of the crowd’s growing irritation with him?

Activity 3:
Students will read the 2nd half of pg. 672 to determine what hint does Steve’s comment give about how characters will react later in the play?

Activity 4:
Students will read the 1st half of pg. 673 to determine what forces are in conflict now? How has the nature the conflict changed?
Read the 2nd half of pg. 673 to determine what happens to Goodman’s car?

Activity 5:
Read the bracketed stage directions aloud. Ask students to paraphrase the main idea of this passage. Read the rest of pg. 674 and page 675 to answer the following:
Why is the problem with Les Goodman considered part of the rising action of the plot?
What does Charlie accuse Goodman of?

Students will turn in their written responses.


posted on: May 10, 2007

Tuesday, May 15, 2007

Warm Up:
What is the difference between prejudice and suspicion?

Reading:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log
Night Write:
Take a writing vacation.

Activity 1:
Review a summary of the play: Hysteria is caused by the community’s prejudice and suspension.
Explain that the narrator’s speech is the one that Rod Serling used to introduce each episode of The Twilight Zone.” Read this paragraph aloud to the students.

Activity 2:
Review the importance of stage directions when reading a play. Students are to reread the stage directions silently on pg. 667 to identify the kinds of directions the stage directions contain.
What is the fifth dimension?
The fifth dimension is the dimension of the imagination.

Activity 3:
Students are to reread the 1st bracketed section on pg. 668 to describe the setting. Why do you think Rod Serling chose this kind of place for the setting of the story?

Prediction: Will the people be able to continue their ordinary lives after the flash in the sky? List the evidence used in determining this prediction.

Activity 4:
Students are to reread the bracketed stage directions on pg. 668 to determine what is happening to the people mentioned in the stage directions.

Activity 5:
Students are to read pg. 668 silently to answer the following:
Do you think the events described in the stage directions are included to move the action forward or to hint that something strange is happening? Explain.

Activity 6:
What is the exposition in the elements of fiction? Students will read pg. 669 silently and answer the following:
How does the playwright use dialogue as the exposition?
What is the inciting incident of the play?
What function does the dialogue serve in the plot? (Read the bracketed passage.)
What strange event occurs just before Maple Street loses electricity?

Activity 7:
3 students will be selected to read the parts of Steve, Tommy, and Charlie. Students are to follow along and answer: What opposing force is introduced here?
Predict what kind of conflicts might result from the threat of an alien presence.
How does a conflict relate to the plot?

Activity 8:
Remember: Foreshadowing gives readers clues about events to come in a literary work.
Students are to read the 1st eight lines on pg. 671. What might these lines foreshadow?
How do Tommy’s words intensify the uneasiness people are feeling?
Identify the element of the plot this text contains.
Rising action

Have students guide a student recorder through the completion of a plot diagram using information read in this play. Use chart paper on the easel to complete this activity.

Students are to read pg. 671 and answer the following:
What does Tommy tell Steve, Don, and Charlie?


posted on: May 10, 2007

Monday, May 14, 2007

Reading:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Night Write:
If you were a resident on Maple Street, how would you have responded to the strange events?
Literature pg. 664-665

Warm Up:
I just heard this morning that the state of Georgia will be extending the school day beginning this August. Write a paragraph explaining your response to this issue.

Activity 1:
Share warm-up responses with the students at your table.

Activity 2:
Play the game of “Gossip.”

Activity 3:
Your emotional response to the warm up and the results of the “Gossip” game are similar to the characters in “The Monsters Are Due on Maple Street.”

Activity 4:
What is the difference between prejudice and suspicion? Discuss this as a whole class.

Activity 5:
Tell a summary of the play: Hysteria is caused by the community’s prejudice and suspension.
Explain that the narrator’s speech is the one that Rod Serling used to introduce each episode of The Twilight Zone.” Read this paragraph aloud to the students.

Activity 6:
Explain the importance of stage directions when reading a play. Students are to read the stage directions silently on pg. 667 to identify the kinds of directions the stage directions contain.
What is the fifth dimension?
The fifth dimension is the dimension of the imagination.

Activity 7:
Students are to read the 1st bracketed section on pg. 668 to describe the setting. Why do you think Rod Serling chose this kind of place for the setting of the story?

Prediction: Will the people be able to continue their ordinary lives after the flash in the sky? Students will need to list the evidence used in determining this prediction. Students may work on this in their table group.

Activity 8:
Students are to read the bracketed stage directions on pg. 668 to determine what is happening to the people mentioned in the stage directions.

Activity 9:
Students are to read pg. 668 silently to answer the following:
Do you think the events described in the stage directions are included to move the action forward or to hint that something strange is happening? Explain.

posted on: May 09, 2007

Friday, May 11, 2007

Warm Up:
How has revising and editing improved your writing this year?Homework:

Reading-Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete a reading log entry answering 5Ws.
Night Write- Complete the portfolio reflection log, if not completed in class.

Activity 1:
Have 2 students pass out the student portfolios and to collect these portfolios at the end of class. After reminding students to put their name on Reflection on Portfolio, read each of the items on the handout to the students. Ask a couple of students to give an example of an answer that would be appropriate for each item.
Using their portfolio, students will complete Reflection on Portfolio. It is imperative that students use their individual portfolio to answer each question with specific detail.

Reflection on Portfolio will be collected for a grade.

posted on: May 08, 2007

Thursday, May 10, 2007

Warm Up:
Why is the use of different sentence openers important when writing a paper?

Homework:
Reading- Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log answering the 5Ws. If you have turned in documentation for reading 25 books, you no longer must maintain a daily reading log.

Reading logs were collected May 8 for a book update.

Night Write- For extra credit students may use the letter generator (http://readwritethink.org/materials/letter_generator/) to copy and paste their persuasive essay on this website. Students will need to add some information (such as an address) to the letter generator. Students will need to pring and turn in a final copy of this letter to me on Friday, May 11.

Genre charts will be due on 5/11.

Activity 1:
Complete and go over Writing and Grammar Workbook pg. 91 and 92 on using different sentence openers.

Activity 2:
Review how to improve short sentences by adding details. Working independently students will complete Writing and Grammar Workbook pg. 93 and 94 on improving short sentences.

Activity 3:
Students will need to update their genre chart and turn it in to me for a grade.


posted on: May 08, 2007

Wednesday, May 9, 2007

Warm Up:
What elements of writing must be included in a persuasive essay?


Homework:
Reading- Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log answering the 5Ws. If you have turned in documentation for reading 25 books, you no longer must maintain a daily reading log.

Reading logs were collected May 8 for a book update.

Night Write-Students will need to submit their essay into e-rater, if this was not completed in class. A printed final copy should be given to me at the end of class today.

Genre charts will be due on 5/11. These have been kept in the student portfolio. Time was given in class today to update these charts.

Papers Collected To Be Graded:
Persuasive Writing Rough Draft
Persuasive Writing Revising and Editing
Persuasive Writing Essay
Genre Chart (if completed)

Activity 1:
Students will have time to update their genre charts.

Activity 2:
Working in table groups students will answer:
Why is it important for no 2 sentences to begin with the same word?
Why is this a challenge for you when writing an essay?

Review using different openers including transitions, subjects, adjectives, adverbs, prepositional phrases, independent, or dependent clauses.

Working independently students will complete pg. 91 and 92 in the Writing and Grammar Workbook.

Activity 3:
Students will go to the book fair for 20 minutes.

posted on: May 08, 2007

Tuesday, May 8, 2007

Homework:
Reading- Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log answering the 5Ws. If you have turned in documentation for reading 25 books, you no longer must maintain a daily reading log.

Reading logs will be collected May 8 for a book update.

Night Write-Students will need to submit their essay into e-rater, if this was not completed in class. A printed final copy must be given to me.

If students will type their persuasive letter and save it to the following site, access to the essay will be available at home and at school.
http://www.pearsonsuccessnet.com/authoring/login/login.jsp. The final copy of the persuasive writing letter will be due Tuesday, May 8.

Genre charts will be due on 5/11. These have been kept in the student portfolio. Time was given in class today to update these charts.


Activity 1:
Working in the MAC lab students will work on submitting their persuasive essay to e-rater.

posted on: May 07, 2007

Monday, May 7, 2007

Homework:
Reading- Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log answering the 5Ws. If you have turned in documentation for reading 25 books, you no longer must maintain a daily reading log.

Reading logs will be collected May 8 for a book update.

Night Write-Students will revise and edit their persuasive essay.

If students will type their persuasive letter and save it to the following site, access to the essay will be available at home and at school.
http://www.pearsonsuccessnet.com/authoring/login/login.jsp. The final copy of the persuasive writing letter will be due Tuesday, May 8.

Genre charts will be due on 5/11. These have been kept in the student portfolio. Time was given in class today to update these charts.


Activity 1:
Working in the MAC lab students will work on submitting their persuasive essay to e-rater.

posted on: May 07, 2007

Friday, May 4, 2007

Homework:
Reading- Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log answering the 5Ws. If you have turned in documentation for reading 25 books, you no longer must maintain a daily reading log.

Night Write-Students will revise their persuasive essay using the information completed on page 6 of the revising checklist handout and page 7 of the editing checklist.

If students will type their persuasive letter and save it to the following site, access to the essay will be available at home and at school.
http://www.pearsonsuccessnet.com/authoring/login/login.jsp. The final copy of the persuasive writing letter will be due Tuesday, May 8.

Genre charts will be due on 5/11. These have been kept in the student portfolio. Time was given in class today to update these charts.


Warm Up:
Appetizers pg. 52

Activity 1:
Students will complete review the completion of pages 1-6 of the revising handout and continue to make revisions in their rough draft.

Activity 2:
Students will review 7 of the editing checklist handout. Please refer students to the Write Source book pg. 232-245 to assist in the final revising and editing of this persuasive writing piece. Pages 1-7 of the guidelines and checklist will be collected on Monday, May 7.

posted on: April 29, 2007

Thursday, May 3, 2007

Homework:
Reading- Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log answering the 5Ws. If you have turned in documentation for reading 25 books, you no longer must maintain a daily reading log.

Night Write-Students will revise their persuasive essay using the information completed on page 6 of the revising checklist handout and page 7 of the editing checklist.
If students will type their persuasive letter and save it to the following site, access to the essay will be available at home and at school.
http://www.pearsonsuccessnet.com/authoring/login/login.jsp
The final copy of the persuasive writing letter will be due Tuesday, May 8.


Genre charts will be due on 5/11. These have been kept in the student portfolio. Time was given in class today to update these charts.


Warm Up:
Appetizers pg. 51

Activity 1:
Students will complete 6 of the revising checklist handout. Students may use a thesaurus and "The Wonders of Writing" notebook to assist them in the revising of their persuasive paper.

Activity 2:
Students will complete 7 of the editing checklist handout.

posted on: April 29, 2007

Wednesday, May 2, 2007

Homework:
Reading- Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log answering the 5Ws. If you have turned in documentation for reading 25 books, you no longer must maintain a daily reading log.

Night Write-Students will revise their persuasive essay using the information completed on pages 2, 3, and 4 of the revising checlist handout.

Genre charts will be due on 5/11. These have been kept in the student portfolio. Time was given in class today to update these charts.

If students will type their persuasive letter and save it to the following site, access to the essay will be available at home and at school.
http://www.pearsonsuccessnet.com/authoring/login/login.jsp


Warm Up:
Appetizers pg. 49


Activity 1:
As students complete their first drafts, they will get with their writing buddy to make sure the graphic organizer and the 4 middle paragraphs are completed correctly. Using the information gathered during the research time, students will create a thesis (opinion) statement, the three main reasons to support their thesis, and facts and examples to validate each reason.
Students must state their problem/issue in the center of their graphic organizer. The 4 key words that will facilitate the completion of this graphic organizer are:
Describe the Problem
Cause
Effect
Call to Action- What can I do to solve this problem?

Activity 2:
Students will work with a writing buddy they have not worked with before to check the strategies that your writing buddy is using to build their argument. The writing buddies will need to check each other's "Guidelines For Writing a Persuasive Essay," making sure the paragraphs are in the correct order and each sentence is in the correct order. Be sure to highlight the clue word in each topic and closing sentence.

Activity 3:
Students will complete pages 2, 3, and 4 of the revising checlist handout.

posted on: April 29, 2007

Tuesday, May 1, 2007

Homework:
Reading- Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log answering the 5Ws. If you have turned in documentation for reading 25 books, you no longer must maintain a daily reading log.
Night Write-Students will finish writing a first draft of the 6-paragraph persuasive letter. Students should be reminded to follow the outline provided on the Persuasive Writing website, if they did not complete this assignment on Friday or Monday. Students should use the following persuasive verbs: may, could, must, should, ought, and would. Students should be reminded to follow the outline provided on the Persuasive Writing website or "How to Write a 5-Paragrasph Persuasive Essay"
http://www.geocities.com/SoHo/Atrium/1437/pers.html
Students will need to write he first draft of the introductory paragraph and the concluding paragraph. The first rough draft including 6 paragraphs were due on Monday.

If students will type their persuasive letter and save it to the following site, access to the essay will be available at home and at school.
http://www.pearsonsuccessnet.com/authoring/login/login.jsp

Genre charts will be due on 5/11. These have been kept in the student portfolio. Time was given in class today to update these charts.


Have your progress report signed, if you have not done so already.

Warm Up:
Appetizers pg. 48


Activity 1:
As students complete their first drafts, they will get with their writing buddy to make sure the graphic organizer and the 4 middle paragraphs are completed correctly. Using the information gathered during the research time, students will create a thesis statement, the three main reasons to support their thesis, and facts and examples to validate each reason.
Students must state their problem/issue in the center of their graphic organizer. The 4 key words that will facilitate the completion of this graphic organizer are:
Describe the Problem
Cause
Effect
Call to Action- What can I do to solve this problem?

Students will work with a writing buddy they have not worked with before to check the strategies that your writing buddy is using to build their argument. Jot down their reasons in the Notes section of the "Peer Editing" handout http://www.readwritethink.org/lesson_images/lesson56/observation.pdf to use as examples later.

Activity 2:
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes focusing on any persuasive strategies used by the author.

Activity 3:
Students will update their genre charts. The completed genre charts are due Friday, May 11.


posted on: April 29, 2007

Monday, April 30, 2007

Homework:
Reading- Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log answering the 5Ws. If you have turned in documentation for reading 25 books, you no longer must maintain a daily reading log.
Night Write-Students will finish writing a first draft of the 6-paragraph persuasive letter. Students should be reminded to follow the outline provided on the Persuasive Writing website, if they did not complete this assignment on Friday. Students should use the following persuasive verbs: may, could, must, should, ought, and would. Students should be reminded to follow the outline provided on the Persuasive Writing website or "How to Write a 5-Paragrasph Persuasive Essay"
http://www.geocities.com/SoHo/Atrium/1437/pers.html
Students will need to write he first draft of the introductory paragraph and the concluding paragraph. The first rough draft including 6 paragraphs were due on Monday.

If students will type their persuasive letter and save it to the following site, access to the essay will be available at home and at school.
http://www.pearsonsuccessnet.com/authoring/login/login.jsp

Have your progress report signed, if you have not done so already.

Warm Up:
Since we have just a few more weeks of school, I need to ...

Activity 1:
As students complete their first drafts, they will get with their writing buddy to make sure the graphic organizer and the 4 middle paragraphs are completed correctly. Using the information gathered during the research time, students will create a thesis statement, the three main reasons to support their thesis, and facts and examples to validate each reason.
Students must state their problem/issue in the center of their graphic organizer. The 4 key words that will facilitate the completion of this graphic organizer are:
Describe the Problem
Cause
Effect
Call to Action- What can I do to solve this problem?

Students will work with their writing buddy to check the strategies http://www.readwritethink.org/lesson_images/lesson56/observation.pdf that your writing buddy is using to build their argument. Jot down their reasons in the Notes section of the Peer Editing http://www.readwritethink.org/lesson_images/lesson56/observation.pdfhandout to use as examples later.


_____

posted on: April 26, 2007

Friday, April 27, 2007

Homework:
Reading- Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log answering the 5Ws. If you have turned in documentation for reading 25 books, you no longer must maintain a daily reading log.
Night Write-Using the completed persuasion maps, students will begin writing a first draft of the 4 middle paragraphs essays. Students should be reminded to follow the outline provided on the Persuasive Writing website, if they did not complete this assignment on Thursday. Students should use the following persuasive verbs: may, could, must, should, ought, and would. Students should be reminded to follow the outline provided on the Persuasive Writing website or "How to Write a 5-Paragrasph Persuasive Essay"
http://www.geocities.com/SoHo/Atrium/1437/pers.html
Students will need to write he first draft of the introductory paragraph and the concluding paragraph. The first rough draft including 6 paragraphs will be due on Monday.

Have your progress report signed.

Activity 1:
Have students access the Persuasive Writing website independently or with a partner to further introduce them to this genre of writing. This website is an excellent resource that walks students through the process of writing a persuasive essay. Students should take notes on the three main sections of a persuasive essay (i.e., introduction, body, and conclusion).

Activity 2:
Label three sheets of chart paper with the three main sections of a persuasive essay. Once students have finished reviewing the website and taking notes, have each student add a detail from his or her notes to the appropriate sheet of chart paper.

Activity 3:
Review with students the main components of a persuasive essay as presented by students on the chart paper.

Activity 4:
Students will meet with their writing buddy to make sure the graphic organizer and the 4 middle paragraphs are completed correctly. Using the information gathered during the research time, students will create a thesis statement, the three main reasons to support their thesis, and facts and examples to validate each reason.
Students must state their problem/issue in the center of their graphic organizer. The 4 key words that will facilitate the completion of this graphic organizer are:
Describe the Problem
Cause
Effect
Call to Action- What can I do to solve this problem?

Students are to transfer their graphic organizer to MS Word, save, and print.

Activity 2:
Using the completed graphic organizer, students will begin writing a first draft of their essays. Students should be reminded to follow the outline provided on the Persuasive Writing website or "How to Write a 5-Paragrasph Persuasive Essay"
http://www.geocities.com/SoHo/Atrium/1437/pers.html

Activity 3:
As students complete their first drafts, they will get with their writing buddy for peer review and conferencing.

Activity 4:
Students should continue with the writing process as they work through revising their first draft.

Activity 5:
Students can then meet with a different peer for additional feedback using the “Conferencing with a Peer” handout, if time allows.

letter generator

http://readwritethink.org/materials/letter_generator/

posted on: April 22, 2007

Thursday, April 26, 2007

Homework:
Reading- Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log answering the 5Ws. If you have turned in documentation for reading 25 books, you no longer must maintain a daily reading log.
Night Write-Using the completed persuasion maps, students will begin writing a first draft of the 4 middle paragraphs essays. Students should be reminded to follow the outline provided on the Persuasive Writing website. Students should use the following persuasive verbs: may, could, must, should, ought, and would.

Graded Papers Returned:
5Ws and H from DEAR
Persuasive Chart

Activity 1:
Students will create a graphic organizer using Inspiration. Using the information gathered during the research time, students will create a thesis statement, the three main reasons to support their thesis, and facts and examples to validate each reason.
Students must state their problem/issue in the center of their graphic organizer. The 4 key words that will facilitate the completion of this graphic organizer are:
Describe the Problem
Cause
Effect
Call to Action- What can I do to solve this problem?

Students are to transfer their graphic organizer to MS Word, save, and print.

Activity 2:
Using the completed graphic organizer, students will begin writing a first draft of their essays. Students should be reminded to follow the outline provided on the Persuasive Writing website or "How to Write a 5-Paragrasph Persuasive Essay"
http://www.geocities.com/SoHo/Atrium/1437/pers.html

Activity 3:
As students complete their first drafts, they will get with their writing buddy for peer review and conferencing.

Activity 4:
Students should continue with the writing process as they work through revising their first draft.

Activity 5:
Students can then meet with a different peer for additional feedback using the “Conferencing with a Peer” handout, if time allows.

posted on: April 20, 2007

Wednesday, April 25, 2007

Homework:
Reading- Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log answering the 5Ws. If you have turned in documentation for reading 25 books, you no longer must maintain a daily reading log.
Night Write-Students need to continue researching their topics and bring in notes taken.

Activity 1:
Students will have time in the computer lab to access the environmental websites "Environmental Education For Kids" http://www.dnr.state.wi.us/org/caer/ce/eek/index.htm, http://www.epa.gov/students/ EPA Student Center, http://epa.gov/climatechange/kids/index.html EPA Global Warming Kids Site, http://audubonaction.org/audubon/home.html Audobon Action, http://environet.policy.net/ National Environmental Trust and find supporting evidence for their essays.

Activity 2:
Students are to take notes on Inspiration and print relevant information that they locate to support their thesis. All notes and printed materials will need to be submitted with the final copy of the essay.
Students must state their problem/issue in the center of their graphic organizer. The 4 key words that will facilitate the completion of this graphic organizer are:
Describe the Problem
Cause
Effect
Call to Action- What can I do to solve this problem?


posted on: April 20, 2007

Tuesday, April 24, 2007

Homework:
Reading- Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log answering the 5Ws. If you have turned in documentation for reading 25 books, you no longer must maintain a daily reading log.

Activity 1:
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and write down the answers to:
who
what
when
why
how
This paper will be collected for a classwork grade.

Activity 2:
Read and discuss as a group Write Source pg. 244 and 245 to ensure that all of the students know the voice to use when writing a persuasive paper. As a table group students will complete the "Try It" activities on both pages. Then this information on voice will be discussed as a group.

posted on: April 20, 2007

Monday, April 23, 2007

Homework:
Reading- Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log answering the 5Ws. If you have turned in documentation for reading 25 books, you no longer must maintain a daily reading log.
Night Write-Select a topic for your persuasive letter. Make a 2-column chart. One side should have the heading
Information I Already Know About__________
Information I Need To Know About_________

Class will be held in the MAC lab.

Activity 1:
Begin the class by asking, “What makes a good argument?” Have students share their ideas about making a good argument.

Activity 2:
The Role Play Activity will be conducted by two student volunteers to read the parts of parent and child in Scenario 1 and two student volunteers to read the parts in Scenario 2. Once the readings are finished, compare the two scenarios and discuss which one provided a better argument. Ask students to identify what made the argument better.

Activity 3:
Review the genre of persuasive essays by reading aloud the sample persuasive essay Should Marine Mammals Be in Captivity? printed from the Internet. Prior to reading, engage students in a brief discussion about whether they think marine mammals should be kept in captivity. Students should respond by stating their opinions on the topic and providing a few reasons to support their opinions. (This step will be completed as a journal writing activity.)

Activity 4:
Students will participate in a discussion in response to the essay. Do students agree or disagree with the author of the essay? Were any students swayed from their previous thoughts on this topic? Students should use information presented in the essay and/or background knowledge to support their opinions as they type in their responses to these questions.

Activity 5:
Have students access the Persuasive Writing website independently or with a partner to further introduce them to this genre of writing. This website is an excellent resource that walks students through the process of writing a persuasive essay. Students should take notes on the three main sections of a persuasive essay (i.e., introduction, body, and conclusion).

Activity 6:
Label three sheets of chart paper with the three main sections of a persuasive essay. Once students have finished reviewing the website and taking notes, have each student add a detail from his or her notes to the appropriate sheet of chart paper.

Activity 7:
Review with students the main components of a persuasive essay as presented by students on the chart paper.

posted on: April 20, 2007

Wednesday, April 18, 2007 - Friday, April 20, 2007

Homework
Reading- Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log answering the 5 Ws.
Night Write- Students are to finish their persuasive song or poem using the 4 amazing facts researched in class and several of the persuasive strategies taught in class.


Activity 1:
With the use of laptops in the classroom or the MAC lab students will work with a partner to complete a poem or a song on "TV or No TV" using http://www.mcps.k12.md.us/schools/stonemilles/thirdgrade/tvturnoff.htm, which supplies the resources and guides students step by step through the process of writing a persuasive argument.

posted on: April 12, 2007

Monday, April 16, 2007

Homework:
Reading-Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log answering the 5Ws.

Classes will be shorter this week due to CRCT testing; therefore, the assignment to be completed today may need to be extended to Tuesday.


Graded Papers Returned:
1. Reading Logs-completion for 4 consecutive days and update on total number of books read so far this year
2. Night Write from 4/12

Activity 1:
Groups will work to complete their small group persuasive essays.

Activity 2:
As each group presents, students will mark off the strategies they hear in each presentation.

posted on: April 12, 2007

Tuesday, April 17, 2007

Homework:
Reading-Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log answering the 5Ws.


Activity 1:
Groups will complete their small group persuasive essays, if the essay was not completed on Monday.

Activity 2:
As each group presents, students will mark off the strategies they hear in each presentation.

Activity 3:
Students will assess the essay they wrote with the rubrik handout.


Activity 4:
With the use of laptops in the classroom or the MAC lab students will work with a partner to complete an essay on "TV or No TV" using http://www.mcps.k12.md.us/schools/stonemilles/thirdgrade/tvturnoff.htm, which supplies the resources and guides students step by step through the process of writing a persuasive argument.

posted on: April 12, 2007

Friday, April 13, 2007

Students will go to the media center to:
1.Students will check out a challenging chapter book and obtain the reading level.
2. Discuss the art of persuasion
3. Review the strategies used in persuasion
4. CRCT review on research skills.

Collected Materials to Be Graded:
reading log
Night Write from 4/12

posted on: April 05, 2007

Thursday, April 12, 2007

Warm Up:
CRCT Prep Items

Homework:
Reading-Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log answering the 5Ws.
Night Write-Students are to write about something new they have learned about persuasive arguments and something they want to work on to become better at persuasive arguments.


Reading logs will be collected on Friday, April 13 to update the number of books read and to check 4 consecutive days of reading entries 4/9-4/12.


Activity 1:
Groups will present their written argument to the class. Before students present, hand out the <a href="http://www.readwritethink.org/lesson_images/lesson56/homework2.pdf">Check the Strategies sheet. Students will mark off the strategies they hear in each presentation.


Activity 2:
After each group presents, ask the class to share any persuasive strategies they heard in the argument.


Activity 3:
With the use of laptops in the classroom or the MAC lab students will work with a partner to complete an essay on "TV or No TV" using http://www.mcps.k12.md.us/schools/stonemilles/thirdgrade/tvturnoff.htm, which supplies the resources and guides students step by step through the process of writing a persuasive argument.

posted on: April 05, 2007

Wednesday, April 11, 2007

Homework:
Reading- Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log answering the 5Ws.

Reading logs will be collected on Friday, April 13 to update the number of books read and to check 4 consecutive days of reading entries 4/9-4/12.


Students will be working in the MAC lab today.


Activity 1:
Students will share the persuasive strategies they found in their piece of writing from yesterday with each other. Go through each persuasive strategy and ask students to share any examples they found in their persuasive pieces with the whole class.

Activity 2:
Students will be continuing to write their argument on why students should sit where they want in the classroom.

Activity 3:
Distribute the Persuasive Writing Assessment http://www.readwritethink.org/lesson_images/lesson56/assessment.pdf with students and read through each category. Explain that you will be using this rubric to help evaluate their essays. Reassure students that if they have questions or if part of the rubric is unclear, you will help them.

Activity 4:
Students will get started started on their persuasive writing by using the interactive Persuasion Map http://www.readwritethink.org/materials/persuasion_map/. This online graphic organizer is a prewriting exercise that enables students to map out their arguments for a persuasive essay.
Have each group enter a name and topics on the opening screen.

The goal or thesis is the claim or stance that they are taking on the issue.

Students should then brainstorm three reasons to support their claim, and facts and examples to support each reason.
Students will be reminded to print their maps before exiting as they cannot save their work online.

Activity 5:
Students will begin writing their persuasive essays, using their printed Persuasion Maps as a guide. Students will write their essays with their partner. As they are working, students will be asked

Activity 6:
Students will be asked to identify the persuasive strategies they are using.

Students should use a variety of persuasive strategies.

Make sure students are using their Persuasion Map as a guide

Writers must have facts to support each opinion.

Students will need to write an interesting beginning and ending.

Students will be encouraged to read their paragraphs to and provide feedback to other pairs of students.

posted on: March 29, 2007

Tuesday, April 10, 2007

Warm Up:
How can a writer/speaker persuade an audience?

Homework:
Reading:
Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log answering the 5Ws.
Night Write:
Ask students to revisit their persuasive piece from http://www.readwritethink.org/lesson_images/lesson56/homework1.pdf Persuasion Is All Around You. This time they will use Check the Strategies to look for the persuasive strategies that the creator of the piece used.

Reading logs will be collected on Friday, April 13 to update the number of books read and to check 4 consecutive days of reading entries 4/9-4/12.

Graded Papers Returned:
Technical Writing Quiz

Activity 1:Students will share their night write with the people at their table.

Activity 2:
Students will have a chance to examine the arguments that they made yesterday to find out what strategies they already know how to use.

Activity 3:
Distribute the <a href="http://mabryonline.org/blogs/abrams/Persuasive%20Strategy%20Definitions">Persuasive Strategy Definitions to each student. Each definition will be explained through Persuasive Strategy PowerPoint.

Activity 4:
Students will discuss the meaning and how students used those strategies in their arguments during in the game yesterday in their table groups.

For example, imagine the reward for the winning team was 10 extra minutes of recess. Here is one possible argument:

“Our classmate Sarah finally got her cast taken off. She hasn’t been able to play outside for two months. For 60 days she’s had to go sit in the nurse’s office while we all played outside. Don’t you think it would be the greatest feeling for Sarah to have 10 extra minutes of recess the first week of getting her cast off?”

This group is trying to appeal to the other students’ emotions. This is an example of pathos.

Activity 5:
As the class discusses the examples from the yesterday's group work, have students write them in the box next to each definition on the Persuasive Strategy Definitions sheet to help them remember each meaning.

Activity 6:
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes focusing on the persuasive techniques the author uses.

posted on: March 29, 2007

Monday, April 9, 2007

Warm Up:
Why is writing persuasively a popular type of writing?


Homework:
Distribute http://www.readwritethink.org/lesson_images/lesson56/homework1.pdf Persuasion Is All Around You. Students are to find an example of a persuasive piece from the newspaper, television, radio, magazine, or billboards around town and be ready to report back to class tomorrow.

Reading logs will be collected on Friday, April 13 to update the number of books read and to check 4 consecutive days of reading entries 4/9-4/12.

Activity 1:
Post a chart with "Winter is the best season" written at the top. One column title will be "Agree" and the 2nd column title will be "Disagree." Distribute sticky notes, and ask students to write their names on the notes. Call students up to the chart to place their notes in the column that expresses their opinion.

Activity 2:
After everyone has had a chance to put their name on the chart, look at the results and discuss how people have different views about various topics and are entitled to their opinions. Give students a chance to share the reasons behind their choices.

Activity 3:
Once students have shared, explain that sometimes when you believe in something, you want others to believe in it also and you might try to get them to change their minds. Ask students the following question: “Does anyone know the word for trying to convince someone to change his or her mind about something?” "persuade"

Activity 4:
Students will play a game that will help them understand how persuasive arguments work.


Each table group will choose a recorder. The recorder's job is to write down the group's arguments.

Students will work together as a group for 15 to 20 minutes to come up with the best reason why the class should be able to select their own seats. Their reasons can be serious or playful.

Each group will present their arguments.

posted on: March 29, 2007

Friday, March 30, 2007

Warm Up:
CRCT Prep items

Homework:
Reading-read for 30 minutes and complete a reading log entry answering the 5Ws.


Activity 1:
Students will take a quiz on Technical Writing .

posted on: March 28, 2007

Thursday, March 29, 2007

Warm Up:
CRCT Prep items

Homework:
Reading-read for 30 minutes and complete a reading log entry answering the 5Ws.

Technical Writing Quiz - on Friday

Activity 1:
Working in table groups students will use Reader's Handbook and Writer's Handbook to obtain the information needed to create a free form map focused on technical writing.

Activity 2:
Students will complete a Technical Writing Study Guide

posted on: March 28, 2007

Wednesday, March 28, 2007

Warm Up:
CRCT Prep items

Graded Papers Returned:
Adjective/Noun list from silent reading on Tuesday

Homework:
Reading-read for 30 minutes and complete a reading log entry answering the 5Ws.

Activity 1:
Working in table groups students will use Reader's Handbook and Writer's Handbook to obtain the information needed to create a free form map focused on technical writing.

posted on: March 24, 2007

Monday, March 26, 2007

Warm Up:
CRCT Prep Items

Homework:
Reading- Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log answering 5Ws.
Night Write If you have not presented your oral oration, prepare for this. Other students may have a writing vacation.

Activity 1:
Oral Presentations

Activity 2:
In small groups students continued to work on Compare and Contrast showing the similarities and differences of technical writing and other kinds of writing according to specific criteria.

Activity 3:
Students will use the information from Compare and Contrast to write a paragraph that answers the question: What are the similarities and differences of technical writing and other types of writing?


Graded Papers To Be Returned:
Last Monday's Night Write

posted on: March 24, 2007

Tuesday, March 27, 2007

Warm Up:
CRCT Review Overhead

Homework
Reading-Students are to read for 30 minutes and complete a reading log entry answering 5Ws.

Activity 1:
Oral Presentations

Activity 2:
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and focus on descriptive adjectives. As students read, they are to write a list of 10 super duper describing adjectives in their reading. They are to write the noun that the adjective modifies. This assignment will be collected for a grade.

posted on: March 22, 2007

Wednesday, March 21, 2007

Warm Up:
What are the similarities and differences of technical writing and other kinds of writing?

Homework:
Night Write- What are the characteristics of technical writing?
Reading- Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log answering 5Ws.

Activity 1:
As a whole group students will complete Compare and Contrast showing the similarities and differences of technical writing and other kinds of writing according to specific criteria.

Activity 2:
Using the information on the graphic organizer students will work in groups to write a paragraph answering, "the similarities and differences of technical writing and other kinds of writing."

Activity 3:
Oral Presentations

posted on: March 20, 2007

Friday, March 23, 2007

Activity 1:
Students who have not presented their oral report will do so today.

Activity 2:
In small groups students continued to work on Compare and Contrast showing the similarities and differences of technical writing and other kinds of writing according to specific criteria.

Graded Papers To Be Returned:
Monday's Night Write

posted on: March 10, 2007

Thursday, March 22, 2007

Students will go to the media to:
find reading levels
check out a book
learn more about how technical writing impacts them
learn guidelines for technical writing

posted on: March 10, 2007

Monday, March 19, 2007

3/19
Materials:
Reader's Handbook pg. 265-272

Warm Up:
What is technical writing?

Homework:
Night Write- How do you utilize technical writing in everyday life?
Reading- Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log answering 5Ws.

Activity 1:
Oral Presentations

Activity 2:
• Students will use prior knowledge to open discussion about technical writing
• Teacher will provide examples of various forms of technical writing, noting:

Characteristics
Types
Real life applications

Activity 3:
Students will participated in a guided reading and discussion with the technical writing information found in Reader's Handbook pg. 265-272.

posted on: March 10, 2007

Wednesday, March 21, 2007

Warm Up:
What are the similarities and differences of technical writing and other kinds of writing?

Homework:
Night Write- What are the characteristics of technical writing?
Reading- Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log answering 5Ws.

Activity 1:
Oral Presentations

Activity 2:
As a whole group students will complete a Compare/Contrast Chart
showing the similarities and differences of technical writing and other kinds of writing.

Activity 3:
Using the information on the graphic organizer students will work in groups to write a paragraph answering, "the similarities and differences of technical writing and other kinds of writing."

posted on: March 09, 2007

Tuesday, March 20, 2007

Warm Up:
What are the characteristics of technical writing?

Homework:
Night Write-What are some examples of technical writing?
Reading- Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log answering 5Ws.

Activity 1:
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes focusing on types of persuasion used in the text.

Activity 2:
Oral Presentations

posted on: March 09, 2007

Friday, March 16, 2007

Warm Up:
Why is it important to speak differently to different audiences? Why is knowing the audience an important part of preparing and delivering an oral presentation?

Homework:
Reading-Students are to read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log answering the 5 Ws.
Night Write-Students will work on their oral presentation.

Activity 1:
Students will receive a guide to assist them in completing a "gift of words" for each presentation. Review of the guide will occur.

Activity 2:
Students who signed up to present today will share their story.

Activity 3:
Make a list of graphic organizers students have used in any of their classes. Refer to the story organizer chart in Reader’s Handbook pg. 305. Students are to set up this chart.

Activity 4:
As a whole class work through the Plot Diagram Explanations using Inspiration and the Promethean board.


posted on: March 05, 2007

Thursday, March 15, 2007

Warm Up:
What kind of preparation goes into the making of a good presentation?

Homework:
Reading-Students are to read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log answering the 5 Ws.
Night Write-Describe 3 key events that show the change in Charles from the beginning of the story until the end of the story (if this assignment was not completed for Wednesday's Night Write. Students will work on their oral presentation.

Activity 1:
Students will receive a guide to assist them in completing a "gift of words" for each presentation. Review of the guide will occur.

Activity 2:
Students who signed up to present today will share their story.

posted on: March 05, 2007

Wednesday, March 14, 2007

Warm Up:
How can electronic techniques assist the writer in preparing and presenting?

Homework:
Reading-Students are to read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log answering the 5 Ws.
Night Write-Describe 3 key events that show the change in Charles from the beginning of the story until the end of the story. Students will work on their oral presentation.

Activity 1:
Students will receive a guide to assist them in completing a "gift of words" for each presentation. Review of the guide will occur.

Activity 2:
Students who signed up to present today will share their story.

Activity 3:
Discuss responses to the warm up questions, making sure “before, during and after” steps are discussed. Refer to Reader’s Handbook pg. 294-305. Take a few minutes to get an idea what the story is about. What process will you complete in order to get this idea?

Activity 4:
Have you ever wondered what you were supposed to get out of a story/piece of reading? Ask yourself what you might find in the story/piece of reading. You could turn the title into a question. Have students turn the title “Charlie” into a question. Have students determine what they might find in the story. The purpose for reading the story “Charlie” might be “Who is Charles, and what is he like?

Activity 5:
Refer to the preview checklist in Reader’s Handbook pg. 295. Using the text and the overheads, preview the story by pointing out the boxes in the margin and the highlighted text. This will guide students through the previewing checklist (Reader’s Handbook pg. 295).

Activity 6:
What information did you learn in the preview? Use overhead pg. 119.The process of previewing this story should take no longer than 2 minutes. The information you gained from the previewing will help you make a plan to get the information you want about Charles. Finding out about him is your purpose for reading the story. Think of a way to get the information and to remember this information. Refer to the questions at the bottom of page 304 in Reader’s Handbook.

Activity 7:
Focus on 1 part of the story. During your reading of this story, put a sticky flag by everything that has to do with Charles. Mark what when he first appears in the story, what he says, what is said about him, and what details are given about him.

Activity 8:
How did the main character in your book chat book change from the beginning of the book until the end? When reading “Charles” you will need to look for the changes in this character. By looking at the changes in the character, you will get an idea of what the author is trying to say.

Activity 9:
Make a list of graphic organizers students have used in any of their classes. Refer to the story organizer chart in Reader’s Handbook pg. 305. Students are to set up this chart.


posted on: March 05, 2007

Monday, March 5-Friday, March 9, 2007

Jekyll Week

posted on: March 05, 2007

Tuesday, March 13, 2007


Warm Up:
What are 3 most important items a presenter must keep in mind in the preparation and the delivery of their oral presentation?

Homework:
Reading-Students are to read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log answering the 5 Ws.
Night Write-Students will work on their oral presentation.


Activity 1:
Using Criteria For Oral Presentation students will get down to the "nitty gritty" in the preparation for their oral presentation.

Activity 2:
Students will review the grade sheet that will be used for their oral presentation.

Activity 3:
"Show and Tell" with Gift of Words will occur.

Activity 4:
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes focusing on 3 sentences that were crucial to the story. For each sentence from the book, students are to write a brief explanation as to why did they select that particular sentence. Students will then paraphrase the sentence. This will be collected.

posted on: March 01, 2007

Monday, March 12, 2007

Warm Up:
Over the past week I realized ...

Homework:
Reading-Students are to read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log answering the 5 Ws.
Night Write-Students will work on their oral presentation.

Reading logs will be collected tomorrow (Tuesday, March 13) to update the number of books read so far this year.

Story boards will be graded.


Activity 1:
Using Criteria For Oral Presentation students will get down to the "nitty gritty" in the preparation for their oral presentation.

Activity 2:
Students will review a copy of the grade sheet that will be used for their oral presentation.

Activity 3:
Students will discuss and review PPT.

posted on: March 01, 2007

Friday, March 2, 2007

Warm Up:
Appetizers pg. 41

Homework:
Reading-Students are to read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log answering the 5 Ws.
Night Write-Students will work on their oral presentation.

Media Grids will be graded.


Activity 1:
Using Criteria For Oral Presentation students will get down to the "nitty gritty" in the preparation for their oral presentation.

Activity 2:
Students will receive a copy of the grade sheet that will be used for their oral presentation.

posted on: March 01, 2007

Thursday, March 1, 2007

Students went to the media center to work on a "Read Across America" initiative, including a review of work cited formats and summarizing.

posted on: March 01, 2007

Wednesday, February 27, 2007

Warm Up:
Appetizers pg. 41

Homework:
Reading-Students are to read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log answering the 5 Ws.
Night Write-Students will work on their oral presentation.


Activity 1:
Using Criteria For Oral Presentation students will get down to the "nitty gritty" in the preparation for their oral presentation.

posted on: February 25, 2007

Tuesday, February 26, 2007

Warm Up:
Appetizers-pg. 37

Homework:

Reading:-Students will read their challenging chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log answering the 5 Ws.
Night Write-Students should work on their storyboard for their oral presentation. Students should put their presentation date on their home calendar.

Activity 1:
Begin working on your story board with your writing buddy.

Activity 2: Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes focusing on the who, what, when, where, why, and how of the text they just read. This will be collected for a grade.

posted on: February 25, 2007

Monday, February 26, 2007

Warm Up:
Appetizers-pg. 36

Homework:

Reading:-Students will read their challenging chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log answering the 5 Ws.
Night Write-Students should work on their media grid their oral presentation. Students should put their presentation date on their home calendar.

Activity 1:
Review/share media grid with your writing buddy.

Activity 2:
Students signed up for their presentation date.

posted on: February 20, 2007

Friday, February 23, 2007

Warm Up:
According to my completion of the revising and editing handouts, I would give myself a grade of _________ on my research paper, because...

Homework:
Students will read their challenging chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log answering the 5 Ws.
Take a writing vacation, if you have already submitted yor research paper to e-rater.

Activity 1:

Panic, Preparation, Practice, and Panache Intro-3.ppt will introduce the oral presentation unit.

Activity 2:
Using manila paper 11" x 24" students will begin making a media grid for their oral presentations.

Activity 3:
Students will sign up for presentation dates with actual presentations beginning on 3/12.

posted on: February 20, 2007

Thursday, February 22, 2007

Appetizers - pg. 35

Homework:
Reading- Students will read for 30 minutes and add an entry to their reading log answering the 5Ws.
Writing- Students are to complete any unfinished parts of their research paper.
Research papers will begin to be submitted to e-rater on 2/16. Final due date for submission ( "Expository: Obeying the Law") and turning in a printed copy of the paper is 2/22.

Activity 1:
Students will work on the typing f their research paper. Their work cited page must be turned in today, if it has not been turned in already. By the end of class on 2/22 students should have:

• printed a final copy of their research paper in MS Word (including the work cited page)
• submitted their research paper to e-rater

posted on: February 20, 2007

Wednesday, February 21, 2007

Warm Up:
Get out all of your revising and editing handouts. Select the one that helped you the most. Explain why and how this revising/editing handout was beneficial to the "polishing" of your research paper.

Homework:
Reading- Students will read for 30 minutes and add an entry to their reading log answering the 5Ws.
Writing- Students are to complete any unfinished parts of their research paper.
Research papers will begin to be submitted to e-rater on 2/16. Final due date for submission and turning in a printed copy of the paper is 2/22.

Activity 1:
Students will share their response to the warm up with the students at their table.

Activity 2:
Students will work on the typing their research paper. Their work cited page must be turned in today, if it has not been turned in already. By the end of class on 2/22 students should have:

posted on: February 20, 2007

Thursday, February 15, 2007

Warm Up:
I am ________________ about giving an oral presentation, because...

Homework:
Reading-read a chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log by answering the 5Ws.
Night Write-make final preparations to submit your research paper to e-rater tomorrow 2/16.
Have progress report signed, if you did not on Wed.

Activity 1:
Students will complete the Expository Reflective Stems handout. This assignment will be collected for a grade.
Students will complete Expository Reflective Stems. This will allow the students to self-assess themselves in the research unit.

1. This piece shows that I'm able to use...in my expository writing because...
Students should be able to list at least 3 out of the following elements:
choosing a topic
finding resources
key words
paraphrasing
taking notes
writing a thesis statement
making an outline
writing a 1st draft
documenting sources
creating a work-cited page

2. This piece shows I really understand the content, because...
Answers should reflect specifically how the student completed any of the above elements.

3. If I could show this piece to anyone, I would show it to _______________, because...

4. If I could show this piece to anyone, I would show it to ___________________, because...

5. The most challenging part of this writing piece was__________________(Students should write one of the elements listed above), because...

6. My (parents, friends, teacher) liked this piece, because...

7. One thing I have learned about myself is..... (include the use of one or more of the above elements)

8. I still have questions about...
Which of the following elements are still a challenge for me?

9. Comments:
The pacing of this unit was...
The handouts for this unit were...
The instructions given during this unit were...

Activity 2:
Students will make final preparations to submit your research paper to e-rater tomorrow 2/16.

Activity 3:
Intro to Oral Presentation will be discussed, including signing up for a specific delivery date beginning 3/12.

posted on: February 08, 2007

Friday, February 16, 2007

Students will type their research paper and submit it into e-rater.
Whew!

posted on: February 08, 2007

Wednesday, February 14, 2007

Warm Up:
Now that my research paper is ready to be submitted to e-rater, I feel ______________________ because...
On a scale of 1-10, with 10 being the highest, how would you grade yourself for your efforts on the research paper_______. Explain why you gave yourself the grade you did.
On a scale of 1-10, with 10 being the highest, how would you grade yourself on completing assignments (each of the baby steps) on time_____. Explain.

Homework:
Reading- Students will read for 30 minutes and add an entry to their reading log answering the 5Ws.
Writing- Students are to complete any unfinished parts of their research paper.
Research papers will begin to be submitted to e-rater on 2/16. Final due date for submission and turning in a printed copy of the paper is 2/22.

Activity 1:
Answer questions regarding the completing of the research paper.

Activity 2:
Students will complete Expository Reflective Stems. This will allow the students to self-assess themselves in the research unit.

1. This piece shows that I'm able to use...in my expository writing because...
Students should be able to list at least 3 out of the following elements:
choosing a topic
finding resources
key words
paraphrasing
taking notes
writing a thesis statement
making an outline
writing a 1st draft
documenting sources
creating a work-cited page

2. This piece shows I really understand the content, because...
Answers should reflect specifically how the student completed any of the above elements.

3. If I could show this piece to anyone, I would show it to _______________, because...

4. If I could show this piece to anyone, I would show it to ___________________, because...

5. The most challenging part of this writing piece was__________________(Students should write one of the elements listed above), because...

6. My (parents, friends, teacher) liked this piece, because...

7. One thing I have learned about myself is..... (include the use of one or more of the above elements)

8. I still have questions about...
Which of the following elements are still a challenge for me?

9. Comments:
The pacing of this unit was...
The handouts for this unit were...
The instructions given during this unit were...

posted on: February 08, 2007

Tuesday, February 13, 2007

Warm Up:
How can a writer locate, gather, and present research information?

Homework:
Reading- Students will read for 30 minutes and add an entry to their reading log answering the 5Ws.
Writing- Students are to complete any unfinished parts of their research paper.
Research papers will begin to be submitted to e-rater on 2/16. Final due date for submission and turning in a printed copy of the paper is 2/22.

Graded Papers Returned Today:
RESEARCH OUTLINE
READING LOG

Activity 1:
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes focusing on the use of vivid action verbs. Students will make a list of 10 action words found during their reading.

Activity 2:
Answer questions regarding the completing of the research paper.

Activity 3:
Students will have time to finish polishing up their research paper.

posted on: February 08, 2007

Monday, February 12, 2007

Materials:
Editing Checklist

Warm Up:
"School Daze" quick write

Research outlines will be collected today for a grade.

Homework:
Reading- Students will read for 30 minutes and add an entry to their reading log answering the 5Ws.
Writing- Students are to complete pg.8, which will guide the students through the editing process for their research paper.
Research papers will begin to be submitted to e-rater on 2/16. Final due date for submission and turning in a printed copy of the paper is 2/22.

Activity 1:
Share responses to the warm-up with the students in your table group.

Activity 2:
Answer any questions regarding the completion of the research paper.

Activity 3:
Using pg. 7 of handout, students will revise their paper focusing on the use of prepositions.

Activity 4:
Students will begin the editing process for their paper using pg. 8 of the handout.

posted on: February 08, 2007

Friday, February 9, 2007

Citation Machine
http://citationmachine.net/

Students will work in the MAC lab to generate their Work Cited page for their research paper.

Research outlines will be collected for a grade on Monday.

posted on: February 05, 2007

Wednesday, February 21, 2007

Reflective Stems

posted on: February 03, 2007

Monday, February 12, 2007

Materials:
Expository Checklist on pages 6 and 7 of this file.

Warm Up:
Appetizers pg. 34

Homework:
Reading- Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log asnwering the 5Ws.
Night Write- Complete the Expository Checklist on pages 6 and 7 of this file.

Activity 1:
Several students from the class will share their research paper.

Activity 2:
With their writing buddy students will begin analyzing their rough draft by using pages 6 and 7 of Expository Checklist


posted on: February 03, 2007

Thursday, February 8, 2007

Materials:
Expository Checklist

Warm Up:
Appetizers pg. 33

Homework:
Reading- Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log asnwering the 5Ws. Reading logs were collected today. Students should have at least 5 consecutive days (2/1 - 2/8) of entries. Be sure to include the reading level.
Night Write- Complete the Expository Checklist on pages 5 and 6 of this file.

Research outlines will be collected on Monday, 2/12.

Activity 1:
Several students from the class will share their research paper.

Activity 2:
With their writing buddy students will begin analyzing their rough draft by using pages 5 and 6 of Expository Checklist

posted on: February 03, 2007

Wednesday, February 7, 2007

Materials:
Expository Checklist
Revising Checklist

Warm Up:
I feel _______________ about my research paper, because __________

Homework:
Reading- Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log asnwering the 5Ws. Reading logs will be collected on Thursday. Students should have at least 5 consecutive days (2/1 - 2/8) of entries. Be sure to include the reading level.
Night Write- Complete the Expository Checklist on page 3 of this file.

Activity 1:
Several students from the class will share their research paper.

Activity 2:
With their writing buddy students will begin analyzing their rough draft by using page 3 of Expository Checklist and Revising Checklist

posted on: February 03, 2007

Tuesday, February 6, 2007

Materials:
Great Source pg. 402, 403-403
Framework For Research
Expository Checklist

Warm Up:
Why research?

Homework:
Reading- Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log asnwering the 5Ws. Reading logs will be collected on Thursday. Students should have at least 5 consecutive days (2/1 - 2/8) of entries. Be sure to include the reading level.
Night Write- Complete the Expository Checklist on page 2 of this file.

Activity 1:
Several students from the class will share their research paper.

Activity 2:
With their writing buddy students will begin analyzing their rough draft by using page 2 of Expository Checklist and Revising Checklist


Activity 3:
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes focusing on the research the author had to do in order to write the book.


posted on: February 03, 2007

Monday, February 5, 2007

Materials:
Great Source pg. 402, 403-403
Framework For Research
Expository Checklist
Revising Checklist


Warm Up:
Now that I have completed my 1st rough draft, I feel I have accomplished...

The concepts (elements of a research paper)I feel comfortable with are...

Homework:
Reading- Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log asnwering the 5Ws. Reading logs will be collected on Thursday. Students should have at least 5 consecutive days (2/1 - 2/8) of entries. Be sure to include the reading level.
Night Write- Complete the Revising Checklist

Activity 1:
Students will complete Framework For Research

Activity 2:
Several students from the class will share their ending paragraph to be analyzed according to the criteria in Great Source pg. 402.

Activity 3:
Students will begin analyzing their rough draft by using page 1 of Expository Checklist and then get with their writing buddy and complete Revising Checklist


Activity 4:
Students will work in table groups to complete a work cited page.

posted on: February 03, 2007

Friday, February 2, 2007

Materials:
Write Source: p.402
Writing a Research Paper pg. 76-80
Framework For Research
Parts of a Paragraph


Warm Up:
What are the key elements of a research paper?

Homework:
Reading-
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log answering 5Ws.
Night Write-
Students will need to finish writing the entire rough draft for their research paper, if this was not completed on Thursday.
Remember: Each topic sentence must include a clue word from the list on the handout.

Activity 1:
Using Write Source: p.402 and Writing a Research Paper pg. 71-74, students will learn the guidelines for writing the concluding paragraph of a research paper.

Activity 2:
Using Parts of a Paragraph students will make sure that each of the middle paragraphs meet the criteria on this document.

Activity 3: Students will complete Framework For Research

posted on: January 30, 2007

Wednesday, January 31, 2007

Students will go to the media center and study "Documenting Sources."

posted on: January 26, 2007

Thursday, February 1, 2007

Materials:
Write Source: p. 399-401
Writing a Research Paper pg. 76-80
Framework For Research
Parts of a Paragraph


Warm Up:
How do you select key words?

Homework:
Reading-
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log answering 5Ws.
Night Write-
Students will need to finish writing the rough draft for the beginning paragraph of their research paper, if this was not completed on Tuesday. Students will need to complete the writing of the rough draft for the middle paragraphs of their research paper.
Remember: Each topic sentence must include a clue word from the list on the handout.

Activity 1:
Using Write Source: p. 398 and Writing a Research Paper pg. 71-74, students will learn the guidelines for writing the body paragraphs of a research paper.
Using Parts of a Paragraph students will make sure that each of the middle paragraphs meet the criteria on this document.

posted on: January 26, 2007

Tuesday, January 30, 2007

Materials:
Write Source: p. 398
Writing a Research Paper pg. 71-74
Framework For Research


Warm Up:
What is the difference between primary and secondary sources?

Homework:
Reading-
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log answering 5Ws.
Night Write-
Students will need to finish writing the rough draft for the beginning paragraph of their research paper.

Activity 1:
Using Write Source: p. 398 and Writing a Research Paper pg. 71-74, students will learn the guidelines for writing the beginning paragraph of a research paper.

Activity 2:
Students will complete the 1st item on question 4 on Framework For Research.

Activity 3:
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes focusing on the descriptive adjectives.

posted on: January 26, 2007

Monday, January 29, 2007

There will be Research Help session on Monday and Tuesday of next week at 8:15 AM.

Warm Up:
What is the difference between plagiarism and paraphrasing?

Homework:
Reading-
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log answering 5Ws.
Night Write-
Students will complete the outline of the research paper.

There will be Research Help session on Tuesday at 8:15 AM.

Activity 1:
Using the software program Inspiration, students will complete a graphic organizer using their notecards. The end products will be a web and an outline to be used for the writing of the first rough draft. Students will print a hard copy of the web and the outline.

posted on: January 25, 2007

Friday, January 26, 2007

Materials:
Framework For Research
http://clv.cobbk12.org Cobb Virtual Library: Students received a sticker with the password to this site. The sticker should be on the inside cover of their agenda.
On Tuesday, January 16, students received a copy of these calendars.
January Timeline (Print Shop software is needed to open this file.)
February Timeline (Print Shop software is needed to open this file.)
On last week's blogs I posted several sites that would be a student's personal tutor for guiding them through the research process.
Write Source

Warm Up:
Appetizers pg. 32

Homework:
Reading-
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log answering 5Ws.
Night Write-
Students may take a writing vacation.
Reading logs will be collected to update the number of books read so far this year. By the end of this marking period, students should have read 20 books.

There will be Research Help session on Monday and Tuesday of next week at 8:15 AM.

Activity 1:
Using the software program Inspiration, students will complete a graphic organizer using their notecards. The end products will be a web and an outline to be used for the writing of the first rough draft. Students will print a hard copy of the web and the outline.

posted on: January 21, 2007

Thursday, January 25, 2007

Materials:
Framework For Research
http://clv.cobbk12.org Cobb Virtual Library: Students received a sticker with the password to this site. The sticker should be on the inside cover of their agenda.
On Tuesday, January 16, students received a copy of these calendars.
January Timeline (Print Shop software is needed to open this file.)
February Timeline (Print Shop software is needed to open this file.)
On last week's blogs I posted several sites that would be a student's personal tutor for guiding them through the research process.
Write Source

Warm Up:
Appetizers pg. 31

Homework:
Reading-
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log answering 5Ws.
Night Write-
Students will complete Framework For Research, which was started in class.

Reading logs will be collected to update the number of books read so far this year. By the end of this marking period, students should have read 20 books.

Activity 1:
Framework For Research will be explained and students will work on the completion of this document.

Activity 2:
Students will put their notecards into 4 stacks according to the 4 key words used to gather information, if this was not completed on Wednesday.

Activity 3:
Using the software program Inspiration, students will complete a graphic organizer using their notecards. The end products will be a web and an outline to be used for the writing of the first rough draft.

posted on: January 21, 2007

Wednesday, January 24, 2007

Materials:
http://clv.cobbk12.org Cobb Virtual Library: Students received a sticker with the password to this site. The sticker should be on the inside cover of their agenda.
On Tuesday, January 16, students received a copy of these calendars.
January Timeline (Print Shop software is needed to open this file.)
February Timeline (Print Shop software is needed to open this file.)
On last week's blogs I posted several sites that would be a student's personal tutor for guiding them through the research process.
Write Source - 382-386 and 394
Writing a Research Paper pg. 48-53
http://www.nacs.k12.in.us/resources/research/Thesis.html

Warm Up:
Appetizers pg. 30

Graded Papers Returned:
Pop Quiz taken on Tuesday 1/23.

Homework:
Reading-read your chapter book for 30 minutes and complete a reading log entry answering 5Ws.
Write to Learn- Make sure you have written a thesis statement according to the guidelines in class.

Reading logs will be collected to update the number of books read so far this year. By the end of this marking period, students should have read 20 books.

Activity 1:
Students will put their bibliography cards in one stack and make sure they have at least 4 sources for their research information. Then students will stack their notecards into 4 stacks with all of the notecards with the same key word in one stack The end product should be 1 stack of bibliography cards and 4 stacks of notecards with key words.

Activity 2:
Using Write Source Write Source - 382-386 and 394, Writing a Research Paper pg. 48-53, and http://www.nacs.k12.in.us/resources/research/Thesis.html students will write a thesis statement for their research paper.

posted on: January 21, 2007

Tuesday, January 23, 2007

Materials:
http://clv.cobbk12.org Cobb Virtual Library: Students received a sticker with the password to this site. The sticker should be on the inside cover of their agenda.
On Tuesday, January 16, students received a copy of these calendars.
January Timeline (Print Shop software is needed to open this file.)
February Timeline (Print Shop software is needed to open this file.)
On last week's blogs I posted several sites thast would be a student's personal tutor for guiding them through the research process.

Warm Up:
What are the 3 parts of a paragraph?
What are the 3 names for the last sentence in a paragraph?

This warm up was collected as a pop quiz.

Homework:
Reading-Reading-The reading you do for your research paper may count for your 30 minutes of reading. No entry on the reading log is required.

Write to Learn- Make sure you have at least 50 note cards completed correctly by Wednesday.

Reading logs will be collected on Thursday to update the number of books read so far this year. By the end of this marking period, students should have read 20 books.


Activity 1:
One student will come to the Promethean board and draw one of their notecards on the board, discussing their thinking process along the way.

Students will turn in one notecard to be graded for format.

Activity 2:
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete a reading log entry.
Reading logs will be collected on Thursday in order to update the total number of books read so far this year. By the end of this 9 week marking period, students should have documentation for having read 20 books.

Activity 3:
Students will use laptops to complete notecards.

posted on: January 21, 2007

Monday, January 22, 2007

Materials:
http://clv.cobbk12.org Cobb Virtual Library: Students received a sticker with the password to this site. The sticker should be on the inside cover of their agenda.
On Tuesday, January 16, students received a copy of these calendars.
January Timeline (Print Shop software is needed to open this file.)
February Timeline (Print Shop software is needed to open this file.)
On last week's blogs I posted several sites thast would be a student's personal tutor for guiding them through the research process.

Warm Up:
The topic I selected to research was ______________ because...
Now that I have completed a bibliography card and some notecards on this topic, I feel ____________________ because...
The pacing of this unit so far has been...

Homework:
Reading-The reading you do for your research paper may count for your 30 minutes of reading. No entry on the reading log is required.
Write to Learn- Make sure you have at least 40 note cards completed correctly by Tuesday.

Reading logs will be collected to update the number of books read so far this year. By the end of this marking period, students should have read 20 books.


Activity 1:
One student will come to the Promethean board and draw one of their notecards on the board, discussing their thinking process along the way.

Activity 2:
Students will use laptops to complete notecards.


posted on: January 21, 2007

Thursday, January 18 and Friday, January 19, 2007

Materials:
<Framework For Research

Information File:
Paraphrasing vs. Plagiariam pg. 11 of this file

Information File:
Gathering and Organizing Information pg.26 of this file

Information File:
Research Plan Made Simple pg. 25 of this file

http://www.nacs.k12.in.us/resources/research/CHSResearchPaperHelp.html

Evaluating a Website
http://school.discovery.com/schrockguide/evalmidd.html

Tips on Searching
http://www.lkwdpl.org/study/research/research.htm

How do I take research notes?
http://www.ehow.com/how_2853_research-notes.html
Students will be going to the media center. Mrs. Hendrix will guide the students in the completion of their resource handout and the framework outline handout.

Evaluating a Source pg. 2 of this file

Writing a Research Paper pg. 40-47

Warm Up:
In a paragraph describe to a younger sibling how to complete a note card for research.

Homework:
Reading-read your chapter book for 30 minutes and complete a reading log entry answering 5Ws.
Write to Learn- Make sure you have at least 30 note cards completed correctly by Monday.

Activity 1:
A demonstration on the completion of a bibliography card and a note card will be shown on the board.

Activity 2:
As a class we will discuss taking notes using Writing a Research Paper pg. 40-47. Students will work individually on taking notes.

Activity 3:
Students will research and complete note cards individually.

posted on: January 18, 2007

Wednesday, January 17, 2007

Materials:
<Framework For Research

Information File:
Paraphrasing vs. Plagiariam pg. 11 of this file

Information File:
Gathering and Organizing Information pg.26 of this file

Information File:
Research Plan Made Simple pg. 25 of this file

http://www.nacs.k12.in.us/resources/research/CHSResearchPaperHelp.html

Evaluating a Website
http://school.discovery.com/schrockguide/evalmidd.html

Tips on Searching
http://www.lkwdpl.org/study/research/research.htm

How do I take research notes?
http://www.ehow.com/how_2853_research-notes.html
Students will be going to the media center. Mrs. Hendrix will guide the students in the completion of their resource handout and the framework outline handout.

Evaluating a Source pg. 2 of this file

Writing a Research Paper pg. 40-47

Warm Up:
In a paragraph describe to a younger sibling how to complete a note card for research.

Homework:
Reading-read your chapter book for 30 minutes and complete a reading log entry answering 5Ws.
Write to Learn- Make sure you have at least 10 note cards completed correctly.

Activity 1:
As a class we will discuss taking notes using Writing a Research Paper pg. 40-47. Students will work as a whole group to complete an example of a note card. This action will be repeated as students practice writing a note card with the students at their table.

Activity 2:
Students will research and complete note cards individually.

posted on: January 12, 2007

Tuesday, January16, 2007

Materials:
<Framework For Research

Information File:
Paraphrasing vs. Plagiariam pg. 11 of this file

Information File:
Gathering and Organizing Information pg.26 of this file

Information File:
Research Plan Made Simple pg. 25 of this file

http://www.nacs.k12.in.us/resources/research/CHSResearchPaperHelp.html

Evaluating a Website
http://school.discovery.com/schrockguide/evalmidd.html

Tips on Searching
http://www.lkwdpl.org/study/research/research.htm

How do I take research notes?
http://www.ehow.com/how_2853_research-notes.html
Students will be going to the media center. Mrs. Hendrix will guide the students in the completion of their resource handout and the framework outline handout.

Evaluating a Source pg. 2 of this file

Write Source pg. 381-393

Writing a Research Paper pg. 18-23

Homework:
Reading
Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log.
Night Write
Students will need to completeEvaluating a Source pg. 2 of this file they will be using for documentation in their research paper.

Materials Needed For the research paper:
100 lined index cards 3x5
1 gal. zip loc bag
1 rubber band for the notecards or a sandwich bag
pencil

Collected Paper to Be Graded:
Choices of Topics and Key Words

Warm Up:
Read Writing a Research Paper pg. 18-22. Write 5 "I Learned" statements about what you learned by reading this information.

Activity 1:
Working in table groups students will complete Writing a Research Paper pg. 23 on locating sources for research.

Activity 2:
As a class students will discuss Write Source pg. 381-393 demonstrating a sample research paper, gathering grid (organizing details), note cards, avoiding plagiarism, and keeping track of your sources.

Activity 3:
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and will be asked to answer the 5Ws about the pages they just read. Students will share this information with the students at their table.

posted on: January 12, 2007

Friday, January 12, 2007

Warm Up:
After reading "Recipe for Success-How to Cook Up a Great Research Paper," write 10 steps for a writing a successful research paper that will apply to you as an individual.

Homework:
Reading
Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log.
Night Write
Students will need to complete the information on the resources they will be using for documentation in their research paper.

Report cards will be sent home today and will need to be signed and returned to the homeroom teacher.

Materials Needed For 1/16/07:
100 lined index cards 3x5
1 gal. zip loc bag
1 rubber band for the notecards or a sandwich bag
pencil

Activity 1:
Guide students through the importance of the following websites and files.

<Framework For Research

Information File:
Paraphrasing vs. Plagiariam pg. 11 of this file

Information File:
Gathering and Organizing Information pg.26 of this file

Information File:
Research Plan Made Simple pg. 25 of this file

http://www.nacs.k12.in.us/resources/research/CHSResearchPaperHelp.html


Evaluating a Website
http://school.discovery.com/schrockguide/evalmidd.html


Tips on Searching
http://www.lkwdpl.org/study/research/research.htm


How do I take notes from sources?
http://www.scs.k12.tn.us/SCS/subject-areas/Research_paper/notes.htm#looks


How do I take research notes?
http://www.ehow.com/how_2853_research-notes.html
Students will be going to the media center. Mrs. Hendrix will guide the students in the completion of their resource handout and the framework outline handout.

posted on: January 09, 2007

Thursday, January 11, 2007

Students will go to the media center where Mrs. Hendrix will give instruction on:
1. Finding Sources
2. Evaluating Sources
3. Key Words
4. Selecting a Challenging Book

Homework:
Reading-
Students will read for 30 minutes and complete a reading log entry answering the 5Ws.
Night Write-
Work on fine-tuning response to literature essay.

posted on: January 09, 2007

Wednesday, January 10, 2007

Materials:
Research Topics pg.1 of this file

Warm Up:
What is the purpose of research? Write 3 answers to this question.

Some of the responses may be:
o To see how academics relate to life
o To find answers; finding answers is not difficult once one has mastered some basic research techniques
o To learn more information about a topic
o To make an educated decision about a major purpose
o To write a paper or essay for class
o To prepare a talk or presentation
o To take part in a debate
o To take part in a class discussion
o To satisfy your curiosity


Homework:
Reading - Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log answering the 5Ws.
Night Write - Resubmit the response to literature essay to the Prentice Hall site. Students must decide which topic will be the one they research.

Activity 1:
Students will go around the room giving and getting responses to the question, so that at the end of two minutes, each student will have a total of 6 responses to the initial question. Students are to return to their seats. As a class share 6 dynamite answers.

Activity 2:
Students will participate in a carousel brainstorming activity regarding the purpose of research, answering one of the following questions at each station:
How is research like mining?
How would you feel if you were a source for research and were never read?
What in research is both hidden and out in the open?
If you were a magazine, which would you be? Why?
How can research be both informative and confusing?
How is taking notes like photography?
If you were a research “tool,” what would you be? Why?
How is an encyclopedia both useful and inadequate?
How are note cards like a closet?

Activity 3:
Students will receive a choice of Research Topics pg.1 of this file
Students will select 4 topics they think might work for them. Each student will complete Works Cited pg.4 of this file
of this file identifying previous knowledge and interest in this specific topic. This activity shouold assist students in narrowing down their choice of topics to one.

.

posted on: December 22, 2006

Tuesday, January 9, 2007

Materials:
Anticipation Guide
http://www2.actden.com/writ_den/tips/paragrap/index.htm
Parts of a Paragraph

Homework:
Reading - Students will read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log answering the 5Ws.
Night Write - Students are make certain that each of the 6 paragraphs in their response to literature essay has a topic sentence, supporting details, and a clincher sentence.Parts of a Paragraph will give you guidelines for each type of sentence.


Warm Up:
What are the 3 essential parts to a paragraph?

Activity 1:
Students will get with their writing buddy to check that each of the topic sentences is related to each of the clincher sentences (in each paragraph).Parts of a Paragraph will be used for this activity.


Activity 2:
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes focusing on topic and clincher sentences. Using sticky notes students will mark 3 topic sentences and 3 clincher sentences.

Activity 3:
Students will need to take their Anticipation Guide
handout to the media center on Wed., Jan. 10. The statements on this handout will need to be verified as Mrs. Hendrix explains resources and guidelines for research.

posted on: December 22, 2006

Monday, January 8, 2007

Materials:
Anticipation Guide
http://www2.actden.com/writ_den/tips/paragrap/index.htm
Parts of a Paragraph

Homework:
Reading - Students will read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log answering the 5Ws.
Night Write - Students are to make a list of the 6 topic sentences and a list of the 6 clincher sentences used in their response to literature essay. Parts of a Paragraph will give you guidelines for each type of sentence.


Warm Up:
Appetizers pg. 28

Activity 1:
Review http://www2.actden.com/writ_den/tips/paragrap/index.htm on topic sentence and clincher sentence.

Activity 2:
Students will get with a partner and complete Anticipation Guide.


posted on: December 19, 2006

Wednesday and Thursday, December 20 and 21, 2006


Homework:
Reading-Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete a reading log entry answering 5Ws.
Night Write-Take a writing vacation.

Activity 1:
Students will go to the MAC lab and type their essay into Prentice Hall. When the typing is completed, students will submit their essay.

posted on: December 12, 2006

Tuesday, December 19, 2006

Homework:

Reading-Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete a reading log entry answering 5Ws.
Night Write-Complete the revision and editing handouts by completing the revising and editing steps of the writing process.
Students will be typing their final copies of their response to literature in the MAC lab tomorrow and Friday. Please make sure to use the suggestions given by your writing buddy during the peer editing when revising and editing tonight. http://www.pearsonsuccessnet.com This is the Prentice Hall website.

Warm Up:
Appetizers pg. 27

Activity 1:
A few students will share their essays, as students listen for key features.

Activity 2:
Students will read their challenging chapter books focusing on the voice the author uses (formal and serious or informal and humorous).

Activity 3:
With their writing buddy students will swap rough drafts, read the paper, and complete the handout.

posted on: December 12, 2006

Monday, December 18, 2006

Materials:


Reflection on Portfolio


student portfolio

Warm Up:
How has your response to literature essay/PowerPoint improved, since you have revised and edited?

Homework:

Reading-Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete a reading log entry answering 5Ws.
Night Write-Complete the revision and editing handouts by completing the revising and editing steps of the reading process. Complete the portfolio reflection log, if not completed in class.

Activity 1:
Students will take a spelling test to determine the 2 students to represent my classes in the school spelling bee. Select a lesson in the spelling book on the bookshelf with the dictionaries to use as the spelling list. This test will not be for a grade.

Activity 2:
Have 2 students pass out the student portfolios and to collect these portfolios at the end of class. After reminding students to put their name on their paper, read each of the items on the handout to the students. Ask a couple of students to give an example of an answer that would be appropriate for each item.
Using their portfolio, students will complete


Reflection on Portfolio. It is imperative that students use their individual portfolio to answer each question with specific detail.

This will be collected for a grade.

posted on: December 12, 2006

Friday, December 15, 2006

Materials:
Write Source - pg. 313 to 316

Warm Up:
How does a writer check for consistency of verb tenses? (Write Source pg. 314)

Homework:
Reading-Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete a reading log entry answering 5Ws.
Night Write-Using the suggestions from their writing buddy, students will continue the revising and editing steps in the writing process with their essay.

Activity 1:
Review editing for verb tense, punctuation, spelling in Write Source pg. 314-315.

Activity 2:
Students will complete the editing handout, as they edit their essay.

Activity 3:
Students will complete a peer editing handout with their writing buddy.

posted on: December 07, 2006

Thursday, December 14, 2006

Students will go to the media center, select a chapter book, and receive preliminary instruction from Mrs. Hendrix on the research unit.


Reading logs will be collected.

Homework:
Reading- Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log answering 5Ws.
Night Write- Take a writing vacation.

posted on: December 07, 2006

Wednesday, December 13, 2006

Students and parents will participate in the coffeehouse, meet the author, and book chat.

Take a homework vacation.

posted on: December 07, 2006

Tuesday, December 12, 2006

Reading logs will be collected on Thursday, December 14. The number of books read so far this year will be updated. Also, students will be graded on 5 consecutive days of reading entries 12/7-12/13.

Homework:
Reading-Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete a reading log entry answering 5Ws.
Night Write-Complete the chart showing original words that were changed with the assistance of a thesaurus.
Give letter and entry pass to parents for the book chat.

Graded Papers Returned:
Focus Statement
Character Chart
Completed Paragraphs in rough draft (should be 6 paragraphs)

Warm Up:
I am looking forward to meeting Mr. Hodus, the author, because...
My prediction is that completing the Inspiration assignment on the computer during the book chat will be ________________ because_________________.

Activity 1:
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes focusing on an important sentence that is crucial to the understanding of the story.

Activity 2:
Students will continue to revise their rough draft by completing the chart showing original words that were changed with the assistance of a thesaurus.

Activity 3:
Students will count the number of words in each sentence and complete the graphic organizer. Students will then revis their rough draft making sure that the use compound and complex sentences.

posted on: December 07, 2006

Monday, December 11, 2006

Materials:
"Kick It Up a Notch" Flipchart
Revising Response to Literature

Reading logs will be collected on Thursday, December 14. The number of books read so far this year will be updated. Also, students will be graded on 5 consecutive days of reading entries 12/7-12/13.

Homework:
Reading-Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete a reading log entry answering 5Ws.
Night Write-Complete the chart where no 2 sentences may begin with the same word.
Give letter and entry pass to parents for the book chat.

Warm Up:
How do you acquire new vocabulary as you read?


Activity 1:
Review with students the Inspiration activity that will be completed during the book chat.

Activity 2: Students will interact with the flipcharts "Kick It Up a Notch."

Activity 3:
Students will revise their rough draft by completing the chart where no 2 sentences may begin with the same word.

posted on: December 04, 2006

Friday, December 8, 2006

Materials:
Write Source – pg. 300 - 312

Warm Up:
Appetizers – pg. 26

Reading logs will be collected on Thursday, December 14. The number of books read so far this year will be updated. Also, students will be graded on 5 consecutive days of reading entries 12/7-12/13.

Homework:
Reading:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Students may read the book they selected for the book chat. Complete an entry on your reading log.
Night Write:
Finish revising your rough draft focusing on the following:
key events that effect the way the character thinks, acts or feels
the importance of transitions
focus statement
descriptive adjectives
vivid verbs
nouns
complex and compound sentences.


Assignments turned in at the end of class:
focus statement
gathering chart
character chart
beginning paragraph
4 middle paragraphs
ending paragraph

Activity 1:
Review Write Source – pg. 300. Finish writing the rough draft for the ending paragraph for the Response to Literature essay/project, and be sure to sum up the theme by showing what the main character learned.
Remember:
 State the theme (what the character learns) in a focus statement (the last sentence in your first paragraph).
 Explain how the theme relates to life in the ending paragraph.

Activity 2:
Students will begin to revise their rough draft focusing on key events that effect the way the character thinks, acts or feels; the importance of transitions; focus statement; descriptive adjectives; vivid verbs; nouns; complex and compound sentences.


posted on: December 01, 2006

Thursday, December 7, 2006

Materials:
Write Source – pg. 300 - 312

Warm Up:
Appetizers – pg. 25

Reading logs will be collected on Thursday, December 14. The number of books read so far this year will be updated. Also, students will be graded on 5 consecutive days of reading entries 12/7-12/13.

Homework:
Reading:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Students may read the book they selected for the book chat. Complete an entry on your reading log.
Night Write:
Your 1st rough draft for Response to Literature essay needs to be completed by December 8 or the storyboard for the alternate assignment.

Assignments to be turned in on 12/8/06:
focus statement
gathering chart
character chart
beginning paragraph
4 middle paragraphs
ending paragraph

Activity 1:
Read aloud Write Source – pg. 300. Write the rough draft for the ending paragraph for the Response to Literature essay/project, and be sure to sum up the theme by showing what the main character learned.
Remember:
 State the theme (what the character learns) in a focus statement (the last sentence in your first paragraph).
 Explain how the theme relates to life in the ending paragraph.


Activity 2:
You should have a complete (6 paragraphs) copy of your rough draft of your essay (double spaced and in pencil) by December 8.

posted on: December 01, 2006

Wednesday, December 6, 2006

Materials:
Write Source – pg. 300 - 312

Warm Up:
Appetizers – pg. 23

Homework:
Assignments due at the end of class on Friday, December 8:
focus statement
gathering chart
character chart
beginning paragraph
4 middle paragraphs
ending paragraph
Reading:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Students may read the book they selected for the book chat. Complete an entry on your reading log.
Night Write:
Your 1st rough draft for Response to Literature essay needs to be completed by December 8 or the storyboard for the alternate assignment.

Activity 1:
Read aloud Write Source – pg. 300. Write the rough draft for the ending paragraph for the Response to Literature essay/project, and be sure to sum up the theme by showing what the main character learned.
Remember:
 State the theme (what the character learns) in a focus statement (the last sentence in your first paragraph).
 Explain how the theme relates to life in the ending paragraph.


Activity 2:
You should have a complete (6 paragraphs) copy of your rough draft of your essay (double spaced and in pencil) by December 8.

posted on: December 01, 2006

Tuesday, December 5, 2006

Materials:
Write Source – pg. 298-299
Response to Literature

Warm Up:
Appetizers pg. 21

Homework:
Reading-Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete a reading log entry answering 5W's.
Night Write-Students will work on their response to literature project or essay.

Activity 1:
Students will read their chapter book focusing on key events.

Activity 2:
Using the information in Write Source – pg. 298-299, students are to finish writing their first rough draft of the 4 middle paragraphs for the response to literature.

Or

Students who are making the PowerPoint, an iMovie, or a webpage must complete a storyboard instead of a rough draft in paragraph format. The PowerPoint, iMovie, or webpage must utilize all of the information on the PowerPoint template.

posted on: December 01, 2006

Monday, December 4, 2006

Materials:
Write Source – pg. 298-299
Response to Literature
Warm Up:
While I have been reading my dream series book, I have visualized...
This book has made me realize...


Homework:
Reading-Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete a reading log entry answering 5W's.
Night Write-Students will work on their response to literature project or essay.

Activity 1:
In table groups students are to share their focus statement and beginning paragraphs.

Activity 2:
Using the information in Write Source – pg. 298-299, students are to write their first rough draft of the 4 middle paragraphs for the response to literature.

Or

Students who are making the PowerPoint, an iMovie, or a webpage must complete a storyboard instead of a rough draft in paragraph format. The PowerPoint, iMovie, or webpage must utilize all of the information on the PowerPoint template.

posted on: December 01, 2006

Friday, December 1, 2006

Materials:
Write Source – pg. 294-297
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/general/gl_pgrph2.html

Warm Up:
Why is the focus statement important to a response to literature essay?

Activity 1:
Have several students share their focus statement.

Activity 2:
Students will write the 1st paragraph of their rough draft using Write Source pg.295-297 andhttp://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/general/gl_pgrph2.html (as a handout), if they did not write it on Thursday.

Activity 3:
Students will have the opportunity to read their dream series book (or another book, if they have finished reading their dream series book).


Activity 4:
Review this optional writing assignment.
Student Options:
Response to Literature could be used to generate any of the following:
PowerPoint
Web Page
iMovie

Students will have the opportunity to choose how to do their final project for the Dream Series novel and Book Chat. The final project is due December 13.


Students may work alone or work with a partner. The partner can be another student who is reading the same book, or their adult reading buddy.


Students may choose to do ONE of the following:

Write an essay (6 paragraphs, following the outline/pp template on Mrs. Abrams' blog).

Create a power point (using the template on Mrs. Abrams' blog).

Create a podcast (following each step in the template on Mrs. Abrams' blog).

Create an iMovie (following each step in the template on Mrs. Abrams' blog).


The required criteria for this assignment is the same as the material on the PowerPoint template.
Reminder to students: The focus statement should be included on the theme slide.

Homework:
Reading:
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log.
Night Write:
Students need to complete the beginning paragraph of their rough draft. Be sure the 1st sentence identifies the title, author, character, background information, and ends with the focus statement.
Students will be expected to be reading the same book that appears as the last entry on their reading log (unless they show evidence of just finishing the book).


Due December 8:
The reading of your selected Dream Series book
Gathering Chart (4 key events) Write Source pg. 292
Character Chart (3-4 main characters) Write Source pg. 293


Homework:
Reading:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Students may read the book they selected for the book chat. Complete an entry on your reading log.
Night Write:
Topic of your choice


posted on: November 29, 2006

Thursday, November 30, 2006

Materials:
Write Source – pg. 294-297
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/general/gl_pgrph2.html

Warm Up:
What is a focus statement?

Activity 1:
Review using the formula on page 294 to write a focus statement.

Activity 2:
Students will write the 1st paragraph of their rough draft using Write Source pg.295-297 andhttp://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/general/gl_pgrph2.html (as a handout).

Student Options:
Response to Literature could be used to generate any of the following:
PowerPoint
Web Page
iMovie

Students will have the opportunity to choose how to do their final project for the Dream Series novel and Book Chat. The final project is due December 13.


Students may work alone or work with a partner. The partner can be another student who is reading the same book, or their adult reading buddy.


Students may choose to do ONE of the following:

Write an essay (6 paragraphs, following the outline/pp template on Mrs. Abrams' blog).

Create a power point (using the template on Mrs. Abrams' blog).

Create a podcast (following each step in the template on Mrs. Abrams' blog).

Create an iMovie (following each step in the template on Mrs. Abrams' blog).


Homework:
Reading:
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log.
Night Write:
Students need to complete the beginning paragraph of their rough draft. Be sure the 1st sentence identifies the title, author, character, background information, and ends with the focus statement.
Students will be expected to be reading the same book that appears as the last entry on their reading log (unless they show evidence of just finishing the book).


Due December 8:
The reading of your selected Dream Series book
Gathering Chart (4 key events) Write Source pg. 292
Character Chart (3-4 main characters) Write Source pg. 293


Homework:
Reading:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Students may read the book they selected for the book chat. Complete an entry on your reading log.
Night Write:
Topic of your choice

posted on: November 29, 2006

Response To Literature Guideline and Checklist

Guidelines and Checklist for Response to Literature

posted on: November 18, 2006

Wednesday, November 29, 2006

Materials:
Book Chat Letter and Book List
Write Source pg. 292-294

Write Source Books have arrived and are in the school store.

The Dream Series books (the choices for the book chat) are available in the school store, several in my room, and 45 are available in the media center.

Warm Up:
Appetizers- pg. 19

Activity 1:
Discuss the contents of a Character Chart (Write Source pg. 292) and a Gathering Chart (Write Source pg. 293).

Activity 2:
Using the formula on pg. 294 in Write Source, students will write a focus statement that will be used in their response to literature essay.

Activity 3:
Students will review the details in their Gathering Chart. In planning the middle paragraphs of this essay, keep the following in mind:
*Decide on the best order for your events
*Add any events you feel necessary to explain your interpretation
Using your events, write a topic sentence for each of your middle paragraphs

As students read their book chat book, they are to be creating a Character Chart including at least 3 characters (Write Source pg. 292) and a Gathering Chart (Write Source pg. 293) of at least 3 of the key events. The events included in the Gathering Chart should show the reader's interest in the character and select details that show you (the reader) care about this story. These completed charts will be due Monday, December 4.


State Standards for the book chat unit:

ELA7R1.b.f Literary
ELA7R2.b
The student demonstrates comprehension and shows evidence of a warranted and responsible explanation of a variety of literary and informational texts. The texts are of the quality and complexity illustrated by the Grade Seven reading list. For literary texts, the student identifies the characteristics of various genres and produces evidence of reading.

ELA7R2.b
The student understands and acquires new vocabulary and uses it correctly in reading and writing.

Homework:
Reading-Read your chapter book for 30 minutes and complete your reading log entry answering the 5 W's.
Night Write-Add information to your character and gathering charts.

posted on: November 17, 2006

Tuesday, November 28, 2006

Materials:
Book Chat Letter and Book List
Write Source pg. 292-293

Write Source Books have arrived and are in the school store.

The Dream Series books (the choices for the book chat) are available in the school store, several in my room, and 45 are available in the media center.

Warm Up:
Appetizers- pg. 18

Activity 1:
Discuss the contents of a gathering chart (Write Source pg. 293).

Activity 2:
Students will read their book chat book for 30 minutes and add details to the Character and Gathering Charts.

As students read their book chat book, they are to be creating a Character Chart including at least 3 characters (Write Source pg. 292) and a Gathering Chart (Write Source pg. 293) of at least 3 of the key events. The events included in the Gathering Chart should show the reader's interest in the character and select details that show you (the reader) care about this story. These completed charts will be due Monday, December 4. Students should complete the reading of their book by December 8.


State Standards for the book chat unit:

ELA7R1.b.f Literary
ELA7R2.b
The student demonstrates comprehension and shows evidence of a warranted and responsible explanation of a variety of literary and informational texts. The texts are of the quality and complexity illustrated by the Grade Seven reading list. For literary texts, the student identifies the characteristics of various genres and produces evidence of reading.

ELA7R2.b
The student understands and acquires new vocabulary and uses it correctly in reading and writing.

Homework:
Reading-Read your chapter book for 30 minutes and complete your reading log entry answering the 5 W's.
Night Write-Add information to your character and gathering charts.

posted on: November 17, 2006

Monday, November 27, 2006

Materials:
Book Chat Letter and Book List
Write Source pg. 292-293

Students received their progress report today. Parents, please sign and have your student return it to me on Tuesday.

Write Source Books have arrived and are in the school store.

The Dream Series books (the choices for the book chat) are available in the school store, several in my room, and 45 are available in the media center.

Warm Up:
Appetizers- pg. 17

Activity 1:
Collect the last page in this packet (that was to be signed) Book Chat Letter and Book List.

Activity 2:
Discuss the contents of a gathering chart (Write Source pg. 293).

Activity 3:
As a class students will complete a gathering chart for "Cinderella".

Activity 4:
In table groups students will complete a Gathering Chart using the events in "Rikki-tikki-tavi".


As students read their book chat book, they are to be creating a Character Chart including at least 3 characters (Write Source pg. 292) and a Gathering Chart (Write Source pg. 293) of at least 3 of the key events. The events included in the Gathering Chart should show the reader's interest in the character and select details that show you (the reader) care about this story. These completed charts will be due Monday, December 4.


State Standards for the book chat unit:

ELA7R1.b.f Literary
ELA7R2.b
The student demonstrates comprehension and shows evidence of a warranted and responsible explanation of a variety of literary and informational texts. The texts are of the quality and complexity illustrated by the Grade Seven reading list. For literary texts, the student identifies the characteristics of various genres and produces evidence of reading.

ELA7R2.b
The student understands and acquires new vocabulary and uses it correctly in reading and writing.

Homework:
Reading-Read your chapter book for 30 minutes and complete your reading log entry answering the 5 W's.
Night Write-Add information to your character and gathering charts.

posted on: November 17, 2006

Tuesday, November 21, 2006

Materials:
Book Chat Letter and Book List
Write Source pg. 287-293

Write Source Books have arrived and are in the school store.
The Dream Series books (the choices for the book chat) are available in the school store, several in my room, and 45 are available in the media center.

Warm Up:
What is the theme of a story?

The theme of a book or story tells the message about life the author gives to the reader


Activity 1:
Collect the last page in this packet (that was to be signed) Book Chat Letter and Book List.

Activity 2:
Review the contents of a Character Chart

Activity 3:
Students will read their challenging chapter book for 30 minutes focusing on the lesson each character learns.

As students read their book chat book, they are to be creating a character chart of at least 3 of the characters. These completed charts will be due December 4. Students should complete the reading of their book by December 8.

Graded Papers Returned on Monday, November 20:
Friendly Letter Rough Draft

State Standards for the book chat unit:

ELA7R1.b.f Literary
ELA7R2.b
The student demonstrates comprehension and shows evidence of a warranted and responsible explanation of a variety of literary and informational texts. The texts are of the quality and complexity illustrated by the Grade Seven reading list. For literary texts, the student identifies the characteristics of various genres and produces evidence of reading.

ELA7R2.b
The student understands and acquires new vocabulary and uses it correctly in reading and writing.

Homework:

Students will need to have their book chat letter signed and bring to class on Tuesday, if they did not have it signed over the weekend.

Reading-Read your chapter book for 30 minutes and complete your reading log entry answering the 5 W's.
Night Write-Add information to your character chart.

posted on: November 17, 2006

Monday, November 20, 2006

Materials:
Book Chat Letter and Book List
Write Source pg. 287-292

Write Source Books have arrived and are in the school store.
The Dream Series books (the choices for the book chat) are available in the school store, several in my room, and 45 are available in the media center.

Warm Up:
How can a response to literature become a social time?

Share the following with others who may want to read the book, after hearing about it from you:
*retell key events
*interpret the theme of the story
*show how the development of the main character relates to the development of the theme

Activity 1:
Collect the last page in this packet (that was to be signed) Book Chat Letter and Book List. A discussion about the nuts and bolts of this day will be shared. Students will share the title of their selection with the students at their table.

Activity 2:
Review the student model of a Response to Literature (Write Source pg. 289-290), and students will view a PowerPoint on writing a response to literature essay.

Activity 3:
As a whole class students will create a character chart using the main characters in "Cinderella."

Activity 4:
In table groups students will create a "Character Chart" (see pg. 292 in Write Source) using the main characters in "Rikki-tikki-tavi."


As students read their book chat book, they are to be creating a character chart of at least 3 of the characters. These completed charts will be due Friday, December 8.

State Standards for the book chat unit:

ELA7R1.b.f Literary
ELA7R2.b
The student demonstrates comprehension and shows evidence of a warranted and responsible explanation of a variety of literary and informational texts. The texts are of the quality and complexity illustrated by the Grade Seven reading list. For literary texts, the student identifies the characteristics of various genres and produces evidence of reading.

ELA7R2.b
The student understands and acquires new vocabulary and uses it correctly in reading and writing.

Homework:

Students will need to have their book chat letter signed and bring to class on Tuesday, if they did not have it signed over the weekend.

Reading-Read your chapter book for 30 minutes and complete your reading log entry answering the 5 W's.
Night Write-Select a book (This book should be read by Friday, December 8 )and a reading buddy. Write a few sentences explaining why you selected the book that you did, if you just selected your book.

posted on: November 17, 2006

Friday, November 17, 2006

Materials:
Book Chat Letter and Book List
Write Source pg. 287-290

Write Source Books have arrived and are in the school store. The Dream Series books (the choices for the book chat)are available in the school store, several in my room, and 45 are available in the media center.


Warm Up:
What is a response to literature essay?

*retell key events
*interpret the theme of the story
*show how the development of the main character relates to the development of the theme

Activity 1:
Students will receive a copy of Book Chat Letter and Book List. A discussion about the nuts and bolts of this day will be shared.

Activity 2:
Review the goals of a writing piece (pg. 288 in Write Source).
Activity 3:
Walk through the student model of a Response to Literature (Write Source pg. 289-290).

State Standards for the book chat unit:

ELA7R1.b.f Literary
ELA7R2.b
The student demonstrates comprehension and shows evidence of a warranted and responsible explanation of a variety of literary and informational texts. The texts are of the quality and complexity illustrated by the Grade Seven reading list. For literary texts, the student identifies the characteristics of various genres and produces evidence of reading.

ELA7R2.b
The student understands and acquires new vocabulary and uses it correctly in reading and writing.

Homework:

Students will need to have their book chat letter signed and bring to class on Monday.

Reading-Read your chapter book for 30 minutes and complete your reading log entry answering the 5 W's.
Night Write-Select a book (This book should be read by Friday, December 8)and a reading buddy. Write a few sentences explaining why you selected the book that you did.

posted on: November 12, 2006

Thursday, November 16, 2006

Warm Up:
Appetizers - pg. 16


Write Source Books have arrived and are in the school store.

Material:
white unlined paper

Activity 1:
Students will handwrite the final copy of their friendly letter.

State Standards for this unit on letter writing

Homework:
Reading-Students will read their challenging chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on the reading log answering the 5 W's.
Night Write-Students will finish handwriting the final copy of their friendly letter.

posted on: November 11, 2006

Wednesday, November 15, 2006

Warm Up:
Appetizers - pg. 15


Write Source Books have arrived and are in the school store.

Graded Papers Returned:
Weekend Night Write

Material:
Guidelines/Checklist For Rough Draft For a Friendly Letter
Parts of a Friendly Letter


Verbs to Use Instead of "Said"
http://www.cyberspaces.net/6traits/wsaid.html
http://www.lunarnut.com/said/
http://www.nyu.edu/classes/copyXediting/said1.html


Activity 1:
Using Part of a Friendly Letter
,Guidelines/Checklist For Rough Draft For a Friendly Letter, The Wonders of Writing, and the thesaurus, students will begin to revise their friendly letter. Students will focus on the use of transitions, no two sentences beginning with the same word, and sensory details.

Homework:
Reading-Students will read their challenging chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on the reading log answering the 5 W's.
Night Write-work on making sure that no two sentences begin with the same word.

posted on: November 11, 2006

Tuesday, November 14, 2006

Warm Up:
Appetizers - pg. 14


Write Source Books have arrived and are in the school store.

Papers Collected to bo Graded: Weekend Night Write

Material:
Guidelines/Checklist For Rough Draft For a Friendly Letter
Parts of a Friendly Letter


Verbs to Use Instead of "Said"
http://www.cyberspaces.net/6traits/wsaid.html
http://www.lunarnut.com/said/
http://www.nyu.edu/classes/copyXediting/said1.html

Activity 1:
Students will read their challenging chapter book for 30 minutes focusing on the emotions exhibited by the main character during their classroom reading.

Activity 2:
Guidelines/Checklist For Rough Draft For a Friendly Letter,Parts of a Friendly Letter, The Wonders of Writing, and the thesaurus, students will begin to revise their friendly letter.

Homework:
Reading-Students will read their challenging chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on the reading log answering the 5 W's.
Night Write-work on making sure that no two sentences begin with the same word.

posted on: November 11, 2006

Monday, November 13, 2006

Warm Up:
What is the organizational structure for writing a friendly letter?


Write Source Books have arrived and are in the school store.

Material:
Guidelines/Checklist For Rough Draft For a Friendly Letter
Parts of a Friendly Letter

Verbs to Use Instead of "Said"
http://www.cyberspaces.net/6traits/wsaid.html
http://www.lunarnut.com/said/
http://www.nyu.edu/classes/copyXediting/said1.html

Activity 1:
Using Guidelines/Checklist For Rough Draft For a Friendly Letter and Parts of a Friendly Letter, students will write the first rough draft of their friendly letter.

State Standards for this unit on letter writing
Homework:
Reading- Read your challenging chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log answering 5W's.
Night Write-Finish writing the 1st rough draft of your friendly letter.

posted on: November 11, 2006

Friday, November 10, 2006

Warm Up:
What is the organizational structure for writing a friendly letter?

Material:
Guidelines/Checklist For Rough Draft For a Friendly Letter

Graded Papers Returned:
Reading Logs
Elements of a Plot
Point of View

Verbs to Use Instead of "Said"
http://www.cyberspaces.net/6traits/wsaid.html
http://www.lunarnut.com/said/
http://www.nyu.edu/classes/copyXediting/said1.html

Activity 1:
While listening to an Andrea Bocelli song, students will make a list of all of the areas they are thankful for with regard to their parents.

Activity 2:
Students will interact with the Letter Format Flipchart.

Activity 3:
Students will write their 1st rough draft of the friendly letter.

State Standards for this unit on letter writing

Homework:
Reading- Read your challenging chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log answering 5W's.
Night Write-You may select a topic of your choice.

posted on: November 08, 2006

Thursday, November 9, 2006

Letter From Prentice Hall Regarding E-rater

Papers Collected to Be Graded:
Reading Logs
Point of View

Students will go to the media center, and receive instruction on the purpose of a book chat. Students will:
hear examples of a book chat
understand the importance of 12/13
understand the purpose of a book chat
understand how a book chat is a social experience
learn about the Dream Series of books
learn about the availability of the Dream Series books
review Internet terms


Reading logs will be collected for a completion grade on 5 consecutive days of entries.

Homework:
Reading- Read your chapter book for 30 minutes and complete a reading log entry answering the 5W's.
Night Write-Take a writing vacation.

posted on: November 08, 2006

Wednesday, November 8, 2006

If you have not submitted your narrative essay, please do so by class time on Friday.
http://www.pearsonsuccessnet.com/authoring/login/login.jsp


Reading logs will be collected on Thursday, Nov. 9. Students will need to show 5 consecutive reading log entries between Wed., Nov. 1 and Wed., Nov. 8.

Materials:
Point of View

Warm Up:
Name the 6 elements of a plot.
This paper will be collected for a grade.

Activity 1:
What is meant by point of view? Give examples from a situation in the class. Show Point of View.

Activity 2:
Working in table groups, students will complete a point of view chart including:
*Determine the conflict of the story, and write a question that includes this conflict.
Example:
Oliver Twist: Due to the recent "crime wave," do you think kids are being unfairly blamed? Why or why not?

Rikki-tikki-tavi:
Due to the survival of the fittest, do you think inhabitants of the jungle are unfairly killed. Why or why not?

For each entry on the point of view chart you must include the following characters- Rikki, Nag, Nagaina, Teddy, Karait, Darzee, Chua, Chuchundra
You must include the following personal information for each character with each entry -
Name
Picture
Age
Job
Address
Answer to question

*Describe the issue that caused the conflict from the antagonist's point of view. Describe the issue that caused the conflict from the protagonist's point of view.

Example-
Antagonist:
Oliver Twist was accused the other day of taking Mr. Brownlow's wallet. Oliver tried to act as if he were chasing the criminal, when he really didn't take it. Artful Dodger was the real "criminalist" in the crime, not Oliver Twist.
Protagonist: Mr. Brownlow’s wallet is missing.

Homework:
Night Write-
Complete a point of view chart with the following information:

Conflict:
Due to the decline in discipline and academic performance in school, do you think students should wear school uniforms? Why or why not?

Answer the question according to how you think the following people would respond:
Dr. Tyson
Mrs Abrams
Mrs. Jackson or Ms. Haag
One of your parents
You

Reading-
Read your challenging chapter book for 30 minutes and complete a reading log entry answering the 5W's.

posted on: November 08, 2006

Friday, November 3, 2006

Materials:
Literature text – pg. 415-422

Reading logs will be collected on Thursday, Nov. 9. Students will need to show 5 consecutive reading log entries between Wed., Nov. 1 and Wed., Nov. 8.

Once a student has submitted their narrative essay to e-rater, they must turn in all of their rough drafts to me for a grade.

Since the e-rater program is experiencing difficulties, student's final grade on this essay will not count against them. If a student received a 6 out of 6, that grade will stick


Warm Up:
Name the 5 elements of a plot.

Activity 1:
Review the beginning of “Rikki-tikki-tavi” and review the elements of plot.

Activity 2:
Following the step-by-step guide the teacher presents, students will read silently and discuss the story from the introduction of the character Nag on page. 411 to Rikki’s pride in himself on pg. 422.

Activity 3:
As a whole class discuss the literary analysis of the story on pg. 423 of the text.

Homework:
• Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Complete an entry on your reading log.
You may take a writing vacation.

posted on: November 03, 2006

Monday, November 6, 2006

If you have not submitted your narrative essay, please do so by class time on Friday.
http://www.pearsonsuccessnet.com/authoring/login/login.jsp


Reading logs will be collected on Thursday, Nov. 9. Students will need to show 5 consecutive reading log entries between Wed., Nov. 1 and Wed., Nov. 8.

Materials:
Point of View

Warm Up:
Identify the 2 sides in the conflict in "Rikki-tiki-tavi?
What is the resolution, or final outcome, of the conflict?

Activity 1:
What is meant by point of view? Give examples from a situation in the class. Show Point of View.

Activity 2:
Working in table groups, students will complete a point of view chart including:
*Determine the conflict of the story, and write a question that includes this conflict.
Example:
Oliver Twist: Due to the recent "crime wave," do you think kids are being unfairly blamed? Why or why not?

Rikki-tikki-tavi:
Due to the survival of the fittest, do you think inhabitants of the jungle are unfairly killed. Why or why not?

For each entry on the point of view chart you must include the following characters- Rikki, Nag, Nagaina, Teddy, Karait, Darzee, Chua, Chuchundra
You must include the following personal information for each character with each entry -
Name
Picture
Age
Job
Address
Answer to question

*Describe the issue that caused the conflict from the antagonist's point of view. Describe the issue that caused the conflict from the protagonist's point of view.

Example-
Antagonist:
Oliver Twist was accused the other day of taking Mr. Brownlow's wallet. Oliver tried to act as if he were chasing the criminal, when he really didn't take it. Artful Dodger was the real "criminalist" in the crime, not Oliver Twist.
Protagonist: Mr. Brownlow’s wallet is missing.

Homework:
Night Write-
Complete a point of view chart with the following information:

Conflict:
Due to the decline in discipline and academic performance in school, do you think students should wear school uniforms? Why or why not?

Answer the question according to how you think the following people would respond:
Dr. Tyson
Mrs Abrams
Mrs. Jackson or Ms. Haag
One of your parents
You

Reading-
Read your challenging chapter book for 30 minutes and complete a reading log entry answering the 5W's.

posted on: October 31, 2006

Tuesday, October 31, 2006

Warm Up:
Appetizers pg. 13

Activity 1:
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes, and then have a book chat with the folks at their table stating:
title
author
main characters
setting of the text just read
1 event that just occurred in your 30 minutes of reading.

Homework:
Have a fun and safe Halloween experience.

posted on: October 22, 2006

Monday, October 30, 2006

Students will go to the MAC lab to type their final copy of their personal narrative. Students will print 1 hard copy and will submit to the computer grading system.

Reading-Read your chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log answering the 5W's.
Write to Learn-If students did not finish typing their essay, this task should be completed at home. Be sure to print 1 hard copy and submit to the computer grading system.

posted on: October 22, 2006

Thursday, November 2, 2006

Materials:
Literature text – pg. 412-422

Reading logs will be collected on Thursday, Nov. 9. Students will need to show 5 consecutive reading log entries between Wed., Nov. 1 and Wed., Nov. 8.

Once a student has submitted their narrative essay to e-rater, they must turn in all of their rough drafts to me for a grade.


Warm Up:
Name the 5 elements of a plot.

Activity 1:
Review the beginning of “Rikki-tikki-tavi” and review the elements of plot.

Activity 2:
Following the step-by-step guide the teacher presents, students will read silently and discuss the story from the introduction of the character Nag on page. 411 to Rikki’s pride in himself on pg. 422.

Activity 3:
As a whole class discuss the literary analysis of the story on pg. 423 of the text.

Homework:
• Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Complete an entry on your reading log.

posted on: October 22, 2006

Friday, October 27, 2006

Materials:
Literature text – pg. 406-411

Overhead:
Dog and cat pictures

Warm Up:
Place the overhead on the overhead projector and have the students respond to:
Jot down your first reaction to the animals. Write some descriptive phrases, adjectives, or idioms that describe the often animosity (bitterness, ill feeling) between these animals. Share some of these responses aloud with the class.

Activity 1:
Have students share their responses with their classmates at their table. Have 2 or 3 volunteers share their response with the entire class.

Activity 2:
Explore the associations we make between animal behaviors (aggression, stealth, curiosity) and human ones. Lead students to “Rikki-tikki-tavi” by telling them that they will read about animal enemies who engage in a “great war” that is made to seem as important as a human conflict.

Activity 3:
Read pg. 406-407 aloud to the students discussing mongooses, parts of a plot, conflict, and predicting along the way of the oral reading. Discuss and give examples of the vocabulary introduced on pg. 407. Have students read the exact sentence in the story where the vocabulary word appears and review the meaning.

Activity 4:
Following the step-by-step guide the teacher presents, students will read silently and discuss the story through the introduction of the character Nag on page. 411.

Homework:
Reading-Read a challenging chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log answering 5W's.
Night Write-Take a writing vacation.

posted on: October 22, 2006

Thursday, October 26, 2006

Materials:
The Wonders of Writing
Write Source – pg. 105-116, 572-573
Guidelines and Checklist (pg. 1-8)
The site below gives models of essays written by students.
http://www.thewritesource.com/models.htm#2000
http://www.greatsource.com/iwrite/students/s_narrative.html(This is a fabulous guide to the steps in writing a personal narrative.)

Warm Up:
Appetizers - pg.12

Activity 1:
Using all 8 pages of Guidelines and Checklist refine your personal narrative.

Activity 2:
Read your essay aloud to your writing buddy. How does it sound? Are you pleased? Do you need to make just a few more changes?


Reading-
Read your challenging chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log answering 5W's.
Night Write-
Complete (all pages 1-8) Guidelines and Checklist making any necessary changes (with your focus on editing).


posted on: October 22, 2006

Wednesday, November 1, 2006

Warm Up:
Last night I _____________________ in the neighborhood, and then I _____________.
Experiencing Halloween as a 7th grader _______________________________. A lesson learned from last night’s experience would be _____________________________. Showing a sense of responsibility was important, for the reason that____________________. Therefore, I _________________________________. All in all Halloween 2006 was _______________________, since__________________. Halloween 2006 will be remembered, because ___________________________.

Reading logs will be collected on Thursday, Nov. 9. Students will need to show 5 consecutive reading log entries between Wed., Nov. 1 and Wed., Nov. 8.


Activity 1:
Students will complete a reflection log on the personal writing unit of study. This will be collected for a test grade.
As a class, go over each item on the test with examples:
1. This piece shows that I’m able to use_________, _________, ________ in my narrative writing because…

Ask the class to give criteria or guidelines that are specifically for writing a personal narrative. Some of the answers should be:
3 types of dialogue
a lesson learned
beginning, middle, and ending paragraphs
sensory details
transitions in the 3 middle paragraphs

2. This piece shows I really understand the content because…
Ask the class to give some specific examples of responses. . Some of the answers should be:
I used…
3 types of dialogue when I explained…
showed the speaker’s personality
kept the action moving
added interesting facts
a lesson learned which was…
beginning, middle, and ending paragraphs when I…
sensory details to describe…

3. If I could show this piece to anyone, I would show it to _______________ because…

Students need to explain specifically what they have included in this paper that they have not in any other piece of writing.

4. People who knew me last year would never believe this piece because…

What evidence does the student explain in their writing that shows improvement in their writing from last year?

5. The most challenging part of this writing piece was ____________ because…

Students need to identify the most challenging part of writing this paper. Explain why this part was such a challenge.


6. My (parents, friend, teacher)(Circle one.) liked this piece because…


When students conferred (talked with) a peer, a friend, a teacher, a parent; what was a positive comment made on this piece of writing?


7. One thing I have learned about myself is…

Students are to identify and explain the work ethic involved in the completion of this assignment. What was involved in completing each of the steps in the writing process?


8. I still have questions about…

What are some of the areas of the writing process or the specific criteria for writing a personal narrative that needs more work? “None” is not an answer.


Comments:
Students are to write any comments they want me to know in order to improve the teaching of this unit or comments in the areas of this unit that were the most helpful.


Homework:
Night Write- Take a writing vacation.
Reading-Read your challenging chapter book for 30 minutes and complete a reading log entry answering the 5W's.

posted on: October 21, 2006

Wednesday, October 25,2006

Materials:
Write Source – pg. 117-119
The Wonders of Writing
Guidelines and Checklist pg.8 Editing
The site below gives models of essays written by students.
http://www.thewritesource.com/models.htm#2000
http://www.greatsource.com/iwrite/students/s_narrative.html(This is a fabulous guide to the steps in writing a personal narrative.)
Conferring Checklist

Warm Up:
If I submitted my essay today, I feel my grade would be____________. The reason I believe my essay is ___________ is because____________. Having one more day to add final touches would be_____________.


Activity 1:
Demonstrate this interactive website to assist in the editing step of the writing process.
http://www.greatsource.com/iwrite/students/s_grammar_hndbk.html

Activity 2:
Students will complete Conferring Checklist with their writing buddy's rough draft. Students will get their rough draft back and make any necessay revisions.

Activity 3:
Students will use Guidelines and Checklist pg.8 Editing to assist in the editing step in the writing process.

Reading-
Read your challenging chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log answering 5W's.
Night Write-
Complete Guidelines and Checklist pg.8 making any necessary changes (with your focus on editing).


posted on: October 18, 2006

Tuesday, October 24, 2006

Materials:
Write Source – pg. 114-116, 572-573
Guidelines and Checklist pg. 7
The site below gives models of essays written by students.
http://www.thewritesource.com/models.htm#2000
http://www.greatsource.com/iwrite/students/s_narrative.html(This is a fabulous guide to the steps in writing a personal narrative.)

Warm Up:
How has the revising processing adding vivid verbs and descriptive adjectives made you feel about the quality of your personal narrative?

Activity 1:
Students will read their challenging chapter book for 30 minutes. While students are reading, they are to make a list of at least 10 prepositions used in the writing of their novel.

Activity 2:
Discuss the corrections made on Guidelines and Checklist pg. 6.

Activity 3:
Complete Guidelines and Checklist pg.7 making any necessary changes/additions with the use of prepositions.

Reading-
Read your challenging chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log answering 5W's.
Night Write-
Complete Guidelines and Checklist pg.7 making any necessary changes

posted on: October 17, 2006

Monday, October 23, 2006

Materials:
Write Source – pg. 114-116, 572-573
The Wonders of Writing
Guidelines and Checklist pg. 6
The site below gives models of essays written by students.
http://www.thewritesource.com/models.htm#2000
http://www.greatsource.com/iwrite/students/s_narrative.html(This is a fabulous guide to the steps in writing a personal narrative.)

Warm Up:
Making sure that no two sentences began with the same word was _________________________ to me because________________. This word choice is necessary for my personal narrative because ___________.

Activity 1:
Discuss the corrections made on Guidelines and Checklist pg. 5.

Activity 2:
Complete Guidelines and Checklist pg.6 making any necessary changes with vivid verbs and descriptive adjectives.

Activity 3:
Students will be able to use The Wonders of Writing to assist them in making revisions in their word choice.

Activity 4:
Students will put their reading logs from the first of October through Thursday, October 19 in their portfolios. At the top of this reading log is the updated number of books read so far this year. Students will need to have read 12 books for the year by December 15.

Reading-
Read your challenging chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log answering 5W's.
Night Write-
Complete Guidelines and Checklist pg.6 making any necessary changes and/or additions with the use of vivid verbs and desctiptive adjectives.

posted on: October 17, 2006

Friday, October 20, 2006

Materials
Guidelines and Checklist pg.5
The Wonders of Writing

Warm Up:
What is the importance of an author using a variety of sentence types and a variety of vocabulary?

Activity 1:
Complete Guidelines and Checklist pg.5 making any necessary changes sentence variety.
At this point in your revising, you may need to print or write a 2nd rough draft in order to have enough space to continue revising.

Activity 2:
Students will be able to use The Wonders of Writing to assist them in making revisions in their word choice.

Homework:
Reading-
Read your challenging chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log answering 5W's.
Night Write-
Complete Guidelines and Checklist pg.5 making any necessary changes sentence variety.

posted on: October 13, 2006

Thursday, October 19, 2006

Materials:
Write Source pg. 123
Guidelines and Checklist pg.3


Warm Up:
What improvements have you made to your essay as a result of your revising?

Reading logs were collected today to update the number of books read.

5W's and H from DEAR reading was returned for a grade.

Activity 1:
Students will have an opportunity to ask questions regarding revising.

Activity 2:
Students will complete Guidelines and Checklist pg.3 making any necessary changes sentence variety.

Homework:
Reading-Read for 30 m,inutes in a challenging chapter book and completing an entry on your reading log that answers 5 W's.
Night Write- Complete Guidelines and Checklist pg.3 making any necessary changes sentence variety.

posted on: October 13, 2006

Tuesday, October 17, 2006

Warm Up:
At this point in time, I have read ________(number of books) and I...

Activity 1:
Students will update their genre chart and determine the next genre to read.

Activity 2:
Students will read their challenging chapter book for 30 minutes focusing on the 5W's and an H. Students will write this information down on paper and turn this assignment in for a grade.

Homework:
Reading-Students will read their challenging chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log answering 5W's.
Night Write-Students will revise their rough draft focusing in on the use of transitions.

posted on: October 11, 2006

Wednesday, October 18, 2006

Materials:
Write Source – pg.116-117,119,120,121,123
Guidelines and Checklist pg.4.
The site below gives models of essays written by students.
http://www.thewritesource.com/models.htm#2000
http://www.greatsource.com/iwrite/students/s_narrative.html(This is a fabulous guide to the steps in writing a personal narrative.)

Warm Up:
Appetizers- pg. 10

Activity 1:
Using Guidelines and Checklist pg.3, students will answer questions 5-15. Students are to make any necessary changes to their rough draft as a result of answering questions 5-15 on Guidelines and Checklist pg.4.

Homework:
Reading- Students are to read their challenging chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log answering the 5 W's.
Night Write - Students are to complete the assignment explained and begun in class. Using Guidelines and Checklist pg.3, students will answer questions 5-15. Students are to make any necessary changes to their rough draft as a result of answering questions 5-15 on Guidelines and Checklist pg.4.


posted on: October 11, 2006

Monday, October 16, 2006

Materials:
Write Source – pg. 114-116, 572-573
Guidelines and Checklist
Outline for Writing a Personal Narrative
The site below gives models of essays written by students.
http://www.thewritesource.com/models.htm#2000
http://www.greatsource.com/iwrite/students/s_narrative.html(This is a fabulous guide to the steps in writing a personal narrative.)

Warm Up:
Now that I have finished writing the 1st rough draft of my personal narrative, I need to...

Students will turn in their completed Outline for Writing a Personal Narrative
for a grade.

Graded Papers Returned-Sensory Detail Chart

Activity 1:
Students will begin the revising process by completing pg.2 of Guidelines and Checklist. Students will be asked to answer specific questions about the rough draft of their essay referring to:
1. Sensory details
2. Vivid descriptions
3. Grabbing the reader's attention in the beginning paragraph
4. Transitions
Students will be given time to revise their rough draft and make any necessary changes to their paper according to the Guidelines and Checklist pg. 2.

Homework:
Reading- Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and answer 5W's in their 1-sentence summary on their reading log.
Night Write- Students will need to finish the 1st revision of their 1st rough draft by finish answering specific questions about the rough draft of their essay referring to:
1. Sensory details
2. Vivid descriptions
3. Grabbing the reader's attention in the beginning paragraph
4. Transitions
Students will be given time to revise their rough draft and make any necessary changes to their paper according to the Guidelines and Checklist pg. 2.

posted on: October 11, 2006

Thursday, October 12, 2006

Materials:
Write Source – pg. 112
Guidelines and Checklist
Outline for Writing a Personal Narrative
The site below gives models of essays written by students.
http://www.thewritesource.com/models.htm#2000
http://www.greatsource.com/iwrite/students/s_narrative.html(This is a fabulous guide to the steps in writing a personal narrative.)
Guidelines
Outline

Warm Up:
While working on this personal narrative essay so far, I realized…

Activity 1:
Student volunteers share their beginning paragraph and their middle paragraph of their essay with the class. Then students share their work with the people at their table.

Activity 2:
Students need to understand that their ending paragraph must serve 2 purposes: conclude the narrative and explain what was learned. If students are having trouble thinking of their ending paragraph, read through the essay aloud. Think about all the ways this experience is important and how this experience has been a life changing event. Read and discuss the example of the ending paragraph Write Source pg. 112

Activity 3:
Students will write the rough draft of their ending paragraph for their essay.

Reading:
Students are to read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log answering the 5 W’s.

Night Write:
Students must make sure the entire rough draft (5 paragraphs) for their personal narrative is completed according to Guidelines and Checklist.
The entire rough draft is due on Monday, October 16.

posted on: October 10, 2006

Prentice Hall site

http://www.pearsonsuccessnet.com

posted on: October 06, 2006

Tuesday, October 10, 2006

Warm Up:
Appetizers - pg. 8

Activity 1:
During the 30 minutes of silent reading today, students will focus on sensory details in their book. Students will need to jot down 5 sensory details included in their reading.

Activity 2:
Students will add any of the sensory details that would be appropriate to their personal narrative to their sensory chart. This chart was complete in class on Wednesday, October 4.

Activity 3:
Students will have an opportunity to ask any questions they might have so far in the writing of their personal narrative.

Homework:
Reading-
Students will read a challenging chapter book for 30 minutes and complete a reading log entry answering the 5 W's.
Night Write-
Students need to make sure they have 3 versions of their beginning paragraph double spaced, in pencil and cursive (if the paragraphs are not typed).

posted on: October 04, 2006

Monday, October 9, 2006

Materials:
Thesaurus
The Wonders of Writing Notebook - pg. 33 and 57
Write Source - pg. 105-107,488
Guidelines and Checklist
http://www.greatsource.com/iwrite/students/s_narrative.html(This is a fabulous guide to the steps in writing a personal narrative.)

Warm Up:
Rambling Autobiography Quick write

Activity 1:
Students will use Word Expansion to discover the benefits of using a thesaurus as a resource in their writing.

Activity 2: (Review)
Using page 105 in Write Source as a model, make a sensory chart for your experience. Then write down words or phrases that describe events in your Quick List. Have students work with a partner to share each sensory chart to make sure that the information includes sensory details and also shows their feeling. Students should refer to page 488 in Write Source for addition help with using sensory details in writing.

Activity 3:
Using page 106 in Write Source as a model, review how to use dialogue effectively in a narrative. Plan to use dialogue in at least 3 places in your essay.
Using pg. 57 in The Wonders of Writing Notebook, review the rules for writing dialogue.

Activity 4: (Review)
Divide your papers into thirds, as you would a business letter.
Label the 3 areas Beginning, Middle, and Ending. Write the events (from you chronological list of 8 events)of your experience in the appropriate section. As you are reviewing your details, begin thinking about an attention grabbing beginning that starts in the middle of the action and an ending that helps the reader understand what the writer learned.

Activity 5: (Review)
Discuss the 3 ways to start your narrative using the examples on page 109. Write one of each kind described on page 109. Use Guidelines and Checklist for a guideline in writing the 1st paragraph. Share with a partner and get feedback on which is the most effective in getting the reader’s attention.

Homework:
• Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Complete an entry on your reading log answering the 5 W's.
• Night Write:
Write one of each type of beginning paragraph for your narrative using one of the 3 examples on page 109, if you have not done so already.

Remember: the 1st draft of your beginning paragraph must be written in pencil on every other line.


Homework:
Reading-Students are to read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log answering the 5 W's.
Night Write-Students are to complete the 3 beginning paragraphs for their narrative, if they have not already.

posted on: October 04, 2006

Thursday, October 5, 2006

Students will go to the media center to:
*find reading levels for books they have or are reading
*select a mystery book (Students should have read 1 nonfiction, 1 science fiction or fantasy already this year.)
* Lesson with Mrs. Hendrix

posted on: September 28, 2006

Wednesday, October 11, 2006

Materials:
Write Source – pg. 110-111
Outline for Writing a Personal Narrative
The site below gives models of essays written by students.
http://www.thewritesource.com/models.htm#2000
http://www.greatsource.com/iwrite/students/s_narrative.html(This is a fabulous guide to the steps in writing a personal narrative.)


The sensory detail chart will be collected on Thursday for a grade.

Warm Up:
Answer the following questions regarding getting all your ideas down on paper:
What is my topic or controlling idea?
What details or examples will develop my topic?
What words should I choose to develop my topic?
In what order should I write my ideas?

Activity 1:
Read pg. 110-111 aloud to the students with the students following along in their books. Be sure to stress the information in the left margins on the example in Write Source.

Activity 2:
Using your web, sensory detail chart, and list of 8 events in chronological order, complete Outline for Writing a Personal Narrative.
Activity 3:
Using the main ideas and details section of the Outline for Writing a Personal Narrative,
students are to write the middle paragraphs of their narrative. They are to begin their middle paragraphs at the end of their beginning paragraph. Students will need to be reminded that they must write this rough draft in pencil, in cursive, and write on every other line. The middle paragraphs must include:
• Sensory details to 4 of the 5 senses
• Chronological order (1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc.)
• Dialogue used in 2 places
o Speaker’s personality
o To keep the action going

Homework:
• Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Complete an entry on your reading log.
• Night Write:
Finish writing 1st rough draft of the middle paragraphs for your narrative using the example on page 110-111 in Write Source and your completed Outline for Writing a Personal Narrative.

Remember: the 1st draft of your beginning paragraph and middle paragraphs must be written in pencil on every other line.


posted on: September 28, 2006

Wednesday, October 4, 2006

Material:
The Wonders of Writing Notebook - pg. 33 and 57
Write Source - pg. 105-107,488
Warm Up:
Now that the brainstorming part of the writing process is complete, answer the following:
What is the purpose for writing?
How will I gather information?
In what form shall I write?
How shall I organize the information?
What is my plan?
Who is my audience?
Who can I talk to about my ideas?


Activity 1:
Using page 105 in Write Source as a model, make a sensory chart for your experience. Then write down words or phrases that describe events in your Quick List. Have students work with a partner to share each sensory chart to make sure that the information includes sensory details and also shows their feeling. Students should refer to page 488 in Write Source for addition help with using sensory details in writing.

Activity 2:
Using page 106 in Write Source as a model, review how to use dialogue effectively in a narrative. Plan to use dialogue in at least 3 places in your essay.
. Uing pg. 57 in The Wonders of Writing Notebook, review the rules for writing dialogue.

Activity 3:
Divide your papers into thirds, as you would a business letter.
Label the 3 areas Beginning, Middle, and Ending. Write the events (from you chronological list of 8 events)of your experience in the appropriate section. As you are reviewing your details, begin thinking about an attention grabbing beginning that starts in the middle of the action and an ending that helps the reader understand what the writer learned.

Activity 4:
Discuss the 3 ways to start your narrative using the examples on page 109. Write one of each kind described on page 109. Share with a partner and get feedback on which is the most effective in getting the reader’s attention.

Homework:
• Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Complete an entry on your reading log.
• Night Write:
Write one of each type of beginning paragraph for your narrative using one of the 3 examples on page 109.

Remember: the 1st draft of your beginning paragraph must be written in pencil on every other line.


Homework:
Reading-Students are to read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log answering the 5 W's.
Night Write-Students are to complete the 3 beginning paragraphs for their narrative.

posted on: September 28, 2006

Tuesday, October 3, 2006

Tuesday, September 20

Materials:
Write Source – pg. 102-104

Warm Up:
Why is it important to plan, draft, revise, edit, and publish a personal narrative?

Activity 1:
Read aloud Stephanie’s Ponytail and discuss examples of cause and effect.

Activity 2:
Have students read their challenging chapter book for 30 min. and write a list of 3 causes and 3 effects from their reading.

Collected Papers:
Cause/Effect

Homework:
• Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Complete an entry on your reading log answering the 5 W's.
• Night Write:
You’ve identified some possible experiences to write about. Now you need to think about what you have learned from each of them. Make a chart with the 3 experiences you starred from the sentence starters on the left side of the paper and the lesson learned from each experience on the right side of the paper. Then circle the experience you could write about in your narrative. Write nonstop about your circled topic for 5 minutes to see what you remember. Also answer the 5 W and H questions about your topic. If you can’t come up with enough details try another topic.

posted on: September 28, 2006

Monday, October 2, 2006

Materials:
Write Source - pg. 104

"When You Start to Write" handout (website below)
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/general/gl_plan2.html

Thought Starters...Asking the Right Questions" handout (website below)
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/general/gl_plan3.html

Web for Brainstorming

Warm Up:
What is meant by the term "chronological order"?

Activity 1:
Have students share their 3 webs completed over the weekend. These webs were to brainstorm for 3 possible topics for their personal narrative essay.

Activity 2:
Using Thought Starters...Asking the Right Questions" handout (website below)
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/general/gl_plan3.html students are to select one of the 3 topics and answer the questions. Students should recognize that the "x" in the question is comparable to the variable or the unknown in their math classes. If students are having difficulty in answering the questions, suggest they select a different topic or to make their original topic more specific and less borad or general.

Activity 3:
Discuss the information in Write Source on pg. 104. Using one of Web for Brainstorming and Thought Starters...Asking the Right Questions" handout (website below)
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/general/gl_plan3.html, have students write 8 main events in order included in their topic.

Homework:
Night Write- Take a writing vacation.
Reading - Read for 30 min. and complete a reading log entry answering the 5 W's.

posted on: September 28, 2006

Friday, September 29, 2006

Materials:
Write Source – pg. 97-100
"When You Start to Write" handout (website below)
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/general/gl_plan2.html

Thought Starters...Asking the Right Questions" handout (website below)
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/general/gl_plan3.html

Web for Brainstorming


Warm Up:
What are the content and form of a personal narrative?

Activity 1:
Using Write Source – pg. 97 have students describe a personal narrative.
A personal narrative is a story that tells about you. It tells about:
• What you did
• What happened to you
• What you learned from the experience

Activity 2:
Understand the goal of writing a personal narrative using Write Source – pg. 98

Activity 3:
Walk through the sample personal narrative (using Write Source – pg. 99-100) emphasizing beginning, middle, end, ideas, organization, voice and word choice.

Activity 4:
Using "When You Start to Write" handout (website below)
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/general/gl_plan2.html, students will begin to see that writing a narrative is just putting the pieces of the writing process together step by step.

Activity 5:
Using the following sentence starters, begin to think about events in your life that have made an impression on you.
The following sentence starters will help you choose a topic that both you and your reader will enjoy:
1. I was helpful when…
2. I was inspired when…
3. I was exhausted when…
4. I was excited when…
5. I was embarrassed when...
6. My most memorable moment was when...

Put an * by your top 3 choices of topics. Make a web for each of your 3 choices. Your web is to have the central idea and 3 key concepts.

Homework:
• Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Complete an entry on your reading log.
• Night Write: The following sentence starters will help you choose a topic that both you and your reader will enjoy:
1. I was helpful when…
2. I was inspired when…
3. I was exhausted when…
4. I was excited when…
5. I was embarrassed when...
6. My most memorable moment was when...

Put stars next to 3 ideas that you think would make interesting topics for a personal narrative. Complete Web for Brainstorming for each of the 3 starred choices.

posted on: September 27, 2006

Thursday, September 28, 2006

Students will return to the MAC lab for the "final touches" of their podcast.


Reading Logs will be collected on Thursday to update the number of books read.

Homework:
Reading:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Be sure that the one-sentence summary on the reading log entry includes who, what, when, where, why.
Night Write:
Take a writing vacation.


posted on: September 24, 2006

Wednesday, September 27, 2006

Materials:
Literature book pg. 116-121

Warm Up:
Why is the writing process beneficial to use when generating a piece of writing?

Graded Papers Returned:
Reflection for Grammar Project

Reading Logs will be collected on Thursday to update the number of books read.


Activity 2:
Read aloud the 1st three sentences in the Background section on pg. 114.
Review the tone of a sory (the writer’s attitude) on pg. 115. Review idioms and their importance in writing on pg. 115.

Activity 3:
Discuss the vocabulary words at the bottom of pg. 115

Activity 4:
Guide the reading of “Seventh Grade” by pointing out the idioms, vocabulary, tone, and reading comprehension.


Homework:
Reading:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Be sure that the one-sentence summary on the reading log entry includes who, what, when, where, why.
Night Write:
Explain how the main character is "Seventh Grade" changes from the beginning of the story to the end of the story.

posted on: September 24, 2006

Tuesday, September 26, 2006

Warm Up:
Appetizers – pg. 7

Activity 1:
Students will go read their chapter book for 30 minutes and focus on the development of the character. In table groups students will have a book chat about the character they followed in their reading.

Activity 2:
Students will fill in the information for a nonfiction book on their genre chart.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Be sure that the one-sentence summary on the reading log entry includes who, what, when, where, why.
Night Write:
Explain how you have used or will use the steps in the writing process to improve your writing..

posted on: September 24, 2006

Monday, September 25, 2006

Materials:
Write Source – pg. 4-28
Literature book pg. 114-115
Promethean flipcharts reviewing the writing process

Warm Up:
What is a personal narrative?

Activity 1:
Review the Writing Process Write Source – pg. 4-28 and the Promethean flipcharts.

Activity 2:
Explain that “Seventh Grade by Gary Soto is an example of a personal narrative. To help students appreciate the experiences of the main character of this story, ask students about their 1st day in 7th grade. Students may refer back to their night write from the beginning of school. Students from other countries will share their experiences moving to the U.S.

Activity 3:
How many of you had someone special you wanted to see?
Have you ever exaggerated your abilities to impress someone you wanted to know?
How many of you have ever done anything to get attention at school?
Write for 5 minutes about feelings and thoughts you have had remembering the 1st day of seventh grade.
The main character in the story you are about to read wants to impress a girl he likes What might happen?
What reasons do you think people might have for trying to impress others?

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Be sure that the one-sentence summary on the reading log entry includes who, what, when, where, why.
Night Write:
Explain how you have used or will use the steps in the writing process to improve your writing..


posted on: September 24, 2006

Friday, September 22, 2006

Materials: Reflection for Grammar Project Warm Up:
Students will read and complete the 2 items on the laminated sheet "On Being Asked to Select the Most Memorable Day in My Life" This activity should take students at least 10 minutes. Have students share their responses with the people at their table. These pieces of paper should be used to answer the questions from the reading in the chapter book. Therefore, students will be turning in 2 assignments on one sheet of paper.

Activity 1:
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes. Students will write 3 questions from the text they just read and answer them. Questions that are answered with one or two words (yes or no, etc.) will not count. Students are to give the page number where the answer to the question can be found. These papers will be collected.

Activity 2:
Students are to complete the Reflection for Grammar Project handout. Students should be reminded that specific details should be included in the answer to each item. The back of the sheet may be used for longer responses.

Homework:
Night Write - Complete the Reflection for the Grammar Project handout and bring it to class on Monday.
Reading - Read a challenging chapter book for 30 min. and complete a reading log entry.

posted on: September 19, 2006

Monday, September 18 - Thursday, September 21


Students will be working diligently as they put the final touches on their part of speech podcast.

Activity 1:
Students will put information from their storyboard into programs on the computer to create a part of speech podcast.

Students received 4 1/2 week progress reports. These are to be signed and returned on Monday, September 18.

Homework:

Reading:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Be sure that the one-sentence summary on the reading log entry includes who, what, when, where, why.

Night Write:
Students are to fine tune a section of their group's script, if necessary.

posted on: September 16, 2006

New and Improved Reading Log

New and Improved Reading Log

posted on: September 10, 2006

Friday, September 15, 2006


Activity 1:
Students will put information from their storyboard into programs on the computer to create a part of speech podcast.

Students received 4 1/2 week progress reports. These are to be signed and returned on Monday, September 18.

Homework:

Reading:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Be sure that the one-sentence summary on the reading log entry includes who, what, when, where, why.

Night Write:
Students are to fine tune a section of their group's script, if necessary.

posted on: September 07, 2006

Thursday, September 14, 2006

Students will go to the media center to:
Find any missing reading levels for their reading logs
Check out a nonfiction book, if they have not read one yet
Check out a mystery book for their next book to read
Lesson from Mrs. Hendrix on Internet vocabulary

Students will turn in their reading log for an update of the number of books read and for completion of the log.

Homework:
Reading:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Be sure that the one-sentence summary on the reading log entry includes who, what, when, where, why.

Night Write:
Write on a topic of your choice.

posted on: September 07, 2006

Wednesday, September 13, 2006

Activity 1:
Students will put information from their storyboard into programs on the computer to create a part of speech podcast.

Homework:
Reading:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Be sure that the one-sentence summary on the reading log entry includes who, what, when, where, why.

Night Write:
Take a writing vacation.

posted on: September 07, 2006

Tuesday, September 12, 2006

Warm Up:
Appetizers – pg. 8

Activity 1:
Students will go read their chapter book for 30 minutes and focus on the development of the character. In table groups students will have a book chat about the character they followed in their reading.

Activity 2:
Students will fill in the information for a nonfiction book on their genre chart.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Be sure that the one-sentence summary on the reading log entry includes who, what, when, where, why.
Night Write:
Topic of your choice

posted on: September 07, 2006

Monday, September 11, 2006


Warm Up:
Name 3 big ideas about your group's parts of speech project.

Activity 1:
A demonstration of the computer programs Keynote, PowerPoint, and Garage Band will be presented.

Activity 2:
Students add to their storyboard what ever information that is needed, knowing the use of the computer programs that will be used.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Be sure that the one-sentence summary on the reading log entry includes who, what, when, where, why.
Night Write:
Topic of your choice

posted on: September 07, 2006

Friday, September 8, 2006

Materials:
Writing and Grammar
Portfolio

Warm Up: Appetizers - pg. 6

Activity 1:

In their work groups students will be working on their scripts for the parts of speech podcast. The group's scripts need to be completed and ready to begin making the podcast on the computers by Monday, September 11.


Homework:

Reading - Students will read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log.

Night Write - Students will bring home a part of their group's script to complete.

posted on: September 02, 2006

Thursday, September 7, 2006

Materials:
Writing and Grammar
Portfolio

Warm Up: Appetizers - pg. 5

Activity 1:

In their work groups students will be working on their scripts for the parts of speech podcast.


Homework:

Reading - Students will read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log.

Night Write - Students will bring home a part of their group's script to complete.

posted on: September 02, 2006

Wednesday, September 6, 2006

Materials:
Writing and Grammar
Portfolio

Warm Up:
"She Thinks I Don't Know"

Activity 1:
In their work groups students will be working on their scripts for the parts of speech podcast.

Homework:
Reading - Students will read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log.
Night Write - Students will bring home a part of their group's script to complete.

posted on: September 01, 2006

Friday, September 1, 2006

Materials:
Writing and Grammar (WAG)
Parts of Speech for Podcasts handout

Warm Up:
Appetizers – pg. 4

Graded Papers Returned:
1 Night Write

Activity 1:
Share the Write to Learn from last night’s homework.

Activity 2:
The Parts of Speech for Podcasts should be completed, if not done so already. Students may work on the completion of the storyboard for their part of speech.

Activity 3:
When students have had their completed storyboard checked by me, the group may begin writing the script for their podcast.

Homework:
Reading-Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log. Students should be reading a nonfiction book presently or about to start one.
Write to Learn- While working on the part of speech podcast, I realized….

posted on: September 01, 2006

Tuesday, September 5, 2006

Materials:
Writing and Grammar
Portfolio

Warm Up:
"Flaws"

Activity 1:
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes focusing on the 5W's and an H on the information they just read. This assignment will be collected for a grade.

Activity 2:
Students will file their base line writing piece (letter to me) in their portfolio.

Students will be turning in their reading logs this Thursday. Students will need to select and read a nonfiction book, if they have not already.

Homework:
Reading:
Read a chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log.
Night Write:
Choose a topic of your choice.

posted on: September 01, 2006

Reflection on Portfolio

Reflection on Portfolio

posted on: August 31, 2006

Reflection on Portfolio

Reflection on Portfolio

posted on: August 31, 2006

Today in class we

Today in class we started with a warm-up. This warm-up was; What are the 1st signs that something strange is happening on Maple Street? How do these signs initiate the conflict on Maple Street?
Share the Night Write responses with the students at the table. Share the responses to the warm up, too.
Review the key events in the play so far. Students are to read the 1st twenty lines of the play on pg. 672 to make the following prediction:
How do you think Tommy will fare in the face of the crowd’s growing irritation with him?
Students will read the 2nd half of pg. 672 to determine what hint does Steve’s comment give about how characters will react later in the play?
Students will read the 1st half of pg. 673 to determine what forces are in conflict now? How has the nature the conflict changed?
Read the 2nd half of pg. 673 to determine what happens to Goodman’s car?
Read the bracketed stage directions aloud. Ask students to paraphrase the main idea of this passage. Read the rest of pg. 674 and page 675 to answer the following:
Why is the problem with Les Goodman considered part of the rising action of the plot?
What does Charlie accuse Goodman of?

Students will turn in their handouts for a grade.

The homework over the weekend is :
1. Read fro 30 mniutes and fill out an entry in your reading logs.
2. How do the people on Maple Street single out Les Goodman? What qualities of his cause the reaction? What does this really suggest what is happening on Maple Street?

posted on: August 31, 2006

Tuesday, September 5, 2006

Materials:
Writing and Grammar
Portfolio

Warm Up:
"Flaws"

Activity 1:
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes focusing on the 5W's and an H on the information they just read. This assignment will be collected for a grade.

Activity 2:
Students will file their base line writing piece (letter to me) in their portfolio.

Students will be turning in their reading logs this Thursday.
Students will need to select and read a nonfiction book, if they have not already.

Homework:
Read a chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log.
Write to Learn:
Students may select a topic of their choice.

posted on: August 31, 2006

Wednesday, September 6, 2006

Materials:
Writing and Grammar

Warm Up:
"Flaws?"

Activity 1:

posted on: August 31, 2006

Tuesday, September 5, 2006

Materials:
Writing and Grammar
Portfolio

Warm Up:
"Flaws"

Activity 1:
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes focusing on the 5W's and an H on the information they just read. This assignment will be collected for a grade.

Activity 2:
Students will file their base line writing piece (letter to me) in their portfolio.

Students will be turning in their reading logs this Thursday.
Students will need to select and read a nonfiction book, if they have not already.

Homework:
Read a chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log.

posted on: August 31, 2006

Grammar Tutorials/Research for Podcast

Review of the 8 Parts of Speech
http://www.uottawa.ca/academic/arts/writcent/hypergrammar/partsp.html

Prepositions
http://www.edhelper.com/language/prepositions3804.html

Pronouns
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/grammar/g_pronuse.html
Adjectives and Adverbs
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/esl/esladjadv.html

Conjunctions
http://www.uottawa.ca/academic/arts/writcent/hypergrammar/conjunct.html

Grammar Gym (information and review on all 8 parts of speech)
http://athena.english.vt.edu/~IDLE/Gym2/workout10/w10.stretch1.html

posted on: August 30, 2006

Friday, September 1, 2006

Materials:
Writing and Grammar (WAG)
Parts of Speech for Podcasts handout

Warm Up:
Appetizers – pg. 4

Activity 1:
Share the Write to Learn from last night’s homework.

Activity 2:
The Parts of Speech for Podcasts should be completed, if not done so already. Students may work on the completion of the storyboard for their part of speech.

Activity 3:
When students have had their completed storyboard checked by me, the group may begin writing the script for their podcast.

Homework:
Reading-Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log. Students should be reading a nonfiction book presently or about to start one.
Write to Learn- While working on the part of speech podcast, I realized….

posted on: August 26, 2006

Thursday, August 31, 2006

Materials:
Writing and Grammar (WAG)
Parts of Speech for Podcasts
handout

Warm Up:
Quick Write

Activity 1:
Share the Write to Learn from last night’s homework.

Activity 2:
Students may work on the completion of the storyboard for their part of speech.

Activity 3:
When students have had their completed storyboard checked by me, the group may begin writing the script for their podcast.

Homework:
Reading-Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log. Students should be reading a nonfiction book presently or about to start one.
Write to Learn- Students may write on a topic of their choice.

posted on: August 26, 2006

Wednesday, August 30, 2006

Wednesday, August 30, 2006

Materials:
Writing and Grammar (WAG)
Parts of Speech for Podcasts
handout

Warm Up:
List the 8 parts of speech.

Activity 1:
Using the flipchart review the 8 parts of speech.

Activity 2:
One student in each work group will draw 1 part of speech from the box. That work group will be responsible for developing a 1-2 podcast that will explain to the viewer all of the information a writer will need to know about that specific part of speech.

Activity 3:
Each work group will begin researching and brainstorming about their Parts of Speech for Podcasts. Students may begin the completion of the storyboard for their part of speech.

Homework:
Reading-Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log. Students should be reading a nonfiction book presently or about to start one.
Write to Learn-Students should complete the following sentence starter:
When I work in a group, I tend to…

posted on: August 26, 2006

Tuesday, August 29, 2006

Warm Up:
How will you demonstrate your knowledge of the 8 parts of speech in your writing?

Papers to Be Collected Today:
5 W’s and H questions answered from the information in the text read in the chapter book in class.

Students will need to bring their Writing and Grammar (WAG) to class on Wednesday.

Activity 1:
Textbooks will be issued. Students will write a list of any damages on their books at the present time.

Activity 2:
Students will share their Write to Learn with their table group and the class.

Activity 3:
Students will read their chapter book and answer the following about the text they just read: who, what, when, where, why, and how. The title and author of the book will need to be on this assignment, before it is turned in to me.


Homework:
Reading-Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log. Students should be reading a nonfiction book presently or about to start one.
Write to Learn-Students should complete the following sentence starter:
When writing I will try to use a variety of vivid verbs, descriptive adjectives, adverbs, etc. because...

posted on: August 26, 2006

Monday, August 28, 2006

Materials:
Checklist for Sun-Mandala handout

Warm Up:
Appetizers – pg. 3

Graded papers that have been returned so far:
Summer Reading
Types of Sentences Quiz
Number of Books Read So Far

Papers Collected Today for a Grade:
Sun-Mandela Project
Checklist for Sun-Mandala

Activity 1:
Students will share their completed projects with the students at their table. A few students will be asked to share their project with the entire table.

Activity 2:
Students will complete the Checklist for Sun-Mandala.

Homework:
Reading-Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log. Students should be reading a nonfiction book presently or about to start one.
Write to Learn-Students should complete the following sentence starter:
When identifying any of the 8 parts of speech, I…

posted on: August 26, 2006

Monday, August 28, 2006

Materials:
Grammar Book

Warm Up:
Appetizers- pg. 2

Activity 1:
Textbooks (grammar and literature) will be distributed to students. Students will complete a list of damages existing today.

Activity 2:
Students will share their Sun Mandela with the students in their work group. A few students will share with the class. Students will turn this finished product in, along with the chart, sun sentences and shadow sentences.

Activity 3:
Students will be introduced to the next unit of study: the 8 parts of speech.
Parts of Speech Podcast
Each work group will draw a part of speech out of the container. The work groups will begin to discuss and create the storyboard.

posted on: August 23, 2006

Friday, August 25, 2006

Materials:
Unlined paper – 1 sheet per student
Markers
Crayons

Handouts:
Checklist for Sun-Mandala

Warm Up:
Quickwrites – My Life


Activity 1:
Within the framework of a circle, using color and shape, but no words, students will draw or symbolize all of their sun images and all of their shadow images. These images may be arranged any way the student wants. Students may want to consider how they place things in relation to each other or consider only the way the colors and shapes look together. The artistry of the mandala is not important. Students are encouraged to use symbols, if they can not draw well. For example, a simple drawing of the footprint if a bear can stand for a bear. Students will discuss how to symbolize something they can not draw. During this activity students will need to consider relationships among the symbols (depicted by size, color, placement, interaction), deepening insights into the character.

Homework:
Reading-Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book and complete an entry on your reading log.
Write to Learn- Complete your sun mandala using the items on the Checklist For the Sun Mandala.

posted on: August 16, 2006

Wednesday, August 23, 2006

Overheads:
Directions For the Sun Mandala

Handouts:
Directions For the Sun Mandala
The sun mandala chart can be found in this file.


Warm Up:
Quickwrites – My Life

Activity 1:
To fill out the 2nd column, students need to express the single characteristic or quality that represents the underlying reason for each choice and place that “quality” word in the 2nd column in the chart. This activity will require thinking. Using a dictionary, a thesaurus, or each other will be beneficial in finding the most appropriate. A lot of discussion needs to occur at this point, so students can help each other select words with the right nuances and connotations. Students may find that another student has selected the same animal; however, their reasons for that selection are very different. One student may be like a lion because of its strength, another because of its voraciousness.

Activity 2:
After the completion of the 2nd column, students are ready to move to the idea of opposites. At this point students are asked to move outward, or sun images, to the inward aspects of their lives and generate a shadow image for each of the 7 categories that will make up the mandala.

Students are to look at the quality they wrote to their animal image. Using a thesaurus as a guide, students should fill in line 1 in the 3rd column with an antonym of the word used in the 2nd column. Make sure that these two words are the same part of speech. For example, if their sun quality is intense, for the panther, their shadow quality might be lethargic rather than lethargic.
Students write the name of an object that is most like (has the quality of) the adjective written in the 3rd column. For example, the word lethargic might have been written in the 3rd column. Now the student thinks of the most lethargic animal they know. This could be a cow. The word cow would be written in the 4th column.

Activity 3:
Students will write shadow sentences using a core sentence, such as “Inwardly, I am like a _______________________________________________ because
_______________________________________________.”

Activity 4:
Within the framework of a circle, using color and shape, but no words, students will draw or symbolize all of their sun images and all of their shadow images. These images may be arranged any way the student wants. Students may want to consider how they place things in relation to each other or consider only the way the colors and shapes look together. The artistry of the mandala is not important. Students are encouraged to use symbols, if they can not draw well. For example, a simple drawing of the footprint if a bear can stand for a bear. Students will discuss how to symbolize something they can not draw. During this activity students will need to consider relationships among the symbols (depicted by size, color, placement, interaction), deepening insights into the character.


Homework:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book and complete an wntry on your reading log.
Write to Learn:
Finish the Sun-Mandala sentences for the 15 min. of Night Write.

posted on: August 16, 2006

Tuesday, August 22, 2006

Materials:
Directions For the Sun Mandala
Aerobics of the Mind

Warm Up:
Why is it important for an author to use a variety of parts of speech in their writing?

Activity 1: Share your sentencess to the sun images.

Activity 2:
Students will read a chapter book for 30 minutes focusing on the setting (time and place)in the action read in class. Students will complete a reading log entry.

Activity 3:
Explain the Aerobics of the Mind

Activity 4:
Students will share their core sentences with the students at their table.

Homework:
Reading-Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log.

posted on: August 16, 2006

Monday, August 21, 2006

Overheads:
Directions For the Sun Mandala

Handouts:
Directions For the Sun Mandala
The sun mandala chart can be found in this file.

Warm Up:
"A Slice of Life"

Activity 1:
Ask students to move into a quiet, receptive frame of mind, and write down their answers to the following questions on the sun mandala chart. There is no discussion at this point, but students will have ample opportunities to talk later.

Selecting the Sun Images
1. What animal are you like most?
2. What plant are you most like?
3. What color are you most like?
4. What shape are you most like?
5. What number are you most like?
6. What mineral or gem are you most like?
7. What natural element are you most like: air, earth, fire, or water? (Students may n\select some aspect of the element or the entire category: breeze, hurricane, or tornado for air, for example; or mountain, desert, or beach for earth.)
8. Students are to complete the first column on the Sun Images chart

These 7 symbols become the sun images of the mandala. The concept of the sun image arises naturally from the method of arriving at these images in a thoughtful, conscious manner, in “the light of the day” as we say.

Activity 2:
Students will write a sentence for each of their specific symbols.
Students may use the following core sentence as they think through their primary reason for selecting each of their sun images.

Suggested Core Sentence:
I am like the (sun image) because, like the (item), I _____________________.

Student Examples:
I am most like the poison oak because, like poison oak, I am harmless until I’m stepped on.

I am most like a giraffe because, like a giraffe, my vision extends beyond my reach.

Homework:
Reading:Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book.
Write to Learn: Complete the sentences for your 7 sun images.

posted on: August 16, 2006

August 21, 2006

Materials:
Write Source – pg. 468-498

Handouts:
Quiz on the 4 types of sentences
Information/order form for Write Source

Warm Up:
Appetizers – pg. 2
Share Night Writes completed at home last night with students at your table.

Activity 1:
Quiz on the 4 types of sentences

a. Add information (use as an adjective to describe either a noun or a pronoun
2. How can I use conjunctions?
a. Connect a series of ideas
b. Expand sentences (with coordinating conjunctions)

Students will share their answers with the students at their table.

Collected Papers:
Quiz on the 4 types of sentences

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book
Collect/respond/react/reflect daily in his/her Write To Learn (3-5 pages per week plus accurate completion of reading log daily)
Possible topic: The grade I want in this class is ______________. I know I will need to….
I am/am not…
Maintain a reading log of books read


posted on: August 12, 2006

Welcome 2006-2007

Be sure to play the video welcome I made for you this year!

posted on: August 11, 2006

Friday, August 18, 2006

Materials:
Writing Analysis

Warm up:
Why must an author use a variety of types of sentences in order to capture your attention?

Activity 1:
Review 4 types of sentences from the following websites:
http://www.pb5th.com/test/writing/4sent_potc.htm#
http://www.mce.k12tn.net/dogs/fern/sentences/online_lesson2.htm
http://palc.sd40.bc.ca/palc/Quiz/sent-type1.htm
http://www.harcourtschool.com/activity/clubhouse/index_pre.html

Activity 2:
Students will complete a quiz on the 4 types of sentences.

Activity 3:
Using the letter written on Wednesday to me, complete a Writing Analysis.

Papers Collected:
Quiz on the 4 types of sentences

Homework: standing HW assignment for the entire year
Reading:(30 minutes) Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book and an accurate completion of reading log
Writing:(15 minutes)After the 1st week of 7th grade, I have realized…

posted on: August 08, 2006

Thursday, August 17, 2006

Handout:
Reading Log

Overhead:
Reading Log

Warm Up:
How should you select a book on your appropriate independent reading level?

Activity 1:
Demonstrate how to access my blog.
http://mabryonline.org/blogs/abrams/

Activity 2:
Demonstrate how to complete an entry on a reading log.

Activity 3:
Discuss what you do to select a book to read.

Activity 4:
Students will participate in a book swap.

Activity 5:
Distribute textbooks as students read in a selected book.

Activity 6:
Students will staple a reading log in the front of their agenda.

A quiz on the 4 types of sentences will be given on Friday (tomorrow).

posted on: August 08, 2006

Wednesday, August 16, 2006

Materials:
Write Source – pg. 518
Overhead with different types of sentences
Write Source is the "best thing since sliced bread," when it comes to guiding students through each step of the writing process for each type of writing assignment. After using the book for the first day the books were available, 13 students (last year) asked if they could buy the text. 60 of my students bought the book to help them perfect their writing. The purchase of this book is optional.


Warm up:
Appetizers – pg. 1


Activity 1:
Write a letter to me explaining what you hope to get out of this class this year.

Activity 2:
Using Write Source – pg. 518 review the 4 kinds of sentences with students giving oral examples.

Activity 3:
In table groups students are to write 4 sentences (one declarative, one interrogative, one imperative, and one exclamatory) describing the 1st two days in this class. Share with the class.

Activity 4:
Using an overhead with different types of sentences, volunteer students will come up and place the type of sentence word with the example of the sentence. Then students will draw a type of sentence and give an oral example.

Activity 5:
In table groups complete the exercise in Write Source on the bottom of pg. 518.

Activity 6:
Students will interact with the following websites to review the 4 types of sentences. Students will work in their table groups:
http://www.pb5th.com/test/writing/4sent_potc.htm#
http://www.mce.k12tn.net/dogs/fern/sentences/online_lesson2.htm
http://palc.sd40.bc.ca/palc/Quiz/sent-type1.htm
http://www.harcourtschool.com/activity/clubhouse/index_pre.html

Closure:
What do you think is necessary in order for a writer to produce a clear and coherent text? Why is the answer to this essential question important in the completion of your letter to me?

Exit pass:
Letter to me explaining what you hope to get out of this class this year.

posted on: August 08, 2006

Tuesday, August 15, 2006

Handouts:
How to Keep a Notebook
Introductory Letter

OH:
What do you think is necessary in order for a writer to produce a clear and coherent text?

Papers Collected:
Signed brochure
Signed syllabus
Summer Reading Activities

Warm Up:
What do you think is necessary in order for a writer to produce a clear and coherent text?

Activity 1:
Review the information in the LA Brochure and share information about the behavior management plan. Distribute and give students time to read and ask questions regarding the information on the “How To Keep a Notebook.”

Activity 2: Students will complete the Carousel Brainstorming activity started on Monday, if necessary.

Activity 3:
In table groups share best part of one of your summer reading selections, other than The Tiger Rising.

Activity 4:
Write a letter to me explaining what you hope to get out of this class this year.

Closure:
What do you think is necessary in order for a writer to produce a clear and coherent text? Why is the answer to this essential question important in the completion of your letter to me?

Exit pass:
Letter to me explaining what you hope to get out of this class this year.

Homework:
Bring summer reading activities to class. Using “How To Keep a Notebook” handout, set up your language arts notebook.


posted on: August 08, 2006

Monday, August 14, 2006

Welcome to a stress free class! Opportunities to become proficient readers and writers abound in ways you can't even think of right now.


Materials:
OH – List everything you have read in the last 24 hours.
OH of seat assignments
Large newsprint
Signs for the carousel brainstorm stations
Markers

Handouts:
LA Brochure
Syllabus

Warm Up:
List everything you have read in the last 24 hours.

Share responses with classmates at your table.

Activity 1:
Make sure students are sitting in their assigned seats.
Welcome and share a few responses from warm up as a class

Activity 2:
Distribute and give students time to read and ask questions regarding the information on the LA brochure and the syllabus. Show example. Show iMovie made by last year's students about Mrs. Abrams' language arts class.

Activity 3:
Show DVD

Activity 4:
Complete the carousel brainstorming activity that results in group summary paragraphs regarding books read over the summer. In table groups students rotate every 2 minutes to a station and answer the posted question. The following are the posted questions:

*Write the title of the book you enjoyed reading the most this summer and rank the book from 1 - 10, with 10 being the highest.
* Identify the time and the place of the main action in one of the books you read for summer reading.
* What is the theme (the message the author gives to the reader)in one of your summer reading books?
* List one major event you read in one of your summer reading books.
* Name one character from a summer reading book that is like you and explain what the two of you have in common.
* How many books did you read this summer?
* What is the best book you have ever read?
* How many books did you read last year from August through May?

The class will share the responses to each question.

Activity 4:
In table groups students write a summary (5-7 sentences)using the information generated from the Carousel Brainstorming activity. Each table will share their summary with the class.

Homework-
Have the brochure and syllabus signed. Bring your summer reading assignments to class by Thursday.

posted on: July 31, 2006

Reading

Happy Reading

posted on: July 03, 2006

Monday, May 22

WAG pg. 360-365
WAG workbook pg. 37-38

Warm Up:
Describe a time when you have left a book or homework at home and then made a call to describe its location to someone who would bring it to you. Use a highlighter and highlight all of the prepositions used in this description.

Activity 1:
Complete the diagnostic test on pg. 361.

Activity 2:
Prepositions show a relationship between 2 things.
The class will complete Exercises 1 and 2 pg. 363-364on the SmartBoard using the online Prentice Hall site.

Both textbooks (literature and grammar) will be collected on Tuesday.

Activity 3:
In table groups students will complete pg. 37-38 in the workbook.

Activity 4:
Students will complete the section review on pg. 365 in table groups.

posted on: May 21, 2006

Tuesday, May 23

Tuesday, May 23


Activity 1:
Students will receive their portfolio. Students will reflect on their work and write a letter answering: What did you learn this year? Did you learn what you wrote about in your first letter to me?

Activity 2:
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and make a list of 25 prepositions read in their text.
Students will have a quiz on prepositions and compound prepositions tomorrow.

Reading Log

The reading log is the daily documentation students complete. The one sentence summary must include the answers to who, what, when, where, and why.

posted on: May 21, 2006

Wednesday, May 24

WAG pg. 366-369
WAG workbook pg. 39-40


Activity 1:
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/esl/eslprep4.html

This site is an interactive experience for students with preposition practice.

Activity 2:
Students will review prepositions used in sentences and the differentiation of a word used as a preposition or as an adverb pg. 366-367.

Activity 3:
In table groups students will complete pg. 39-40 in the workbook.

Activity 4:
Students will complete the section review on pg. 369


Student took a quiz on prepositions.

Reading Log

The reading log is the daily documentation students complete. The one sentence summary must include the answers to who, what, when, where, and why.

posted on: May 21, 2006

Thursday, May 25

Thursday, May 25

Students will complete the chapter review on pages 370-371.


Reading Log

The reading log is the daily documentation students complete. The one sentence summary must include the answers to who, what, when, where, and why.

posted on: May 21, 2006

Summer Reading Log

Reading Log

The reading log is the daily documentation students complete. The one sentence summary must include the answers to who, what, when, where, and why.

posted on: May 16, 2006

Friday, May 19

Students will work on the Prentice Hall website for :The may 11 on Maple St.," including bio information on Rod Serling, a short quiz, and info of the time period the play was written.

Students will reflect on concepts learned in this class. Each table group will generate a concept map using their reflections.

Reading Log

The reading log is the daily documentation students complete. The one sentence summary must include the answers to who, what, when, where, and why.

posted on: May 15, 2006

Thursday, May 18

Thursday, May 18
Materials:
Literature pg. 667-684

Activity 1:
Students will be selected to read aloud the parts for Act I of “The may 11 on Maple Street.”

Activity 2:
Students will be selected to read aloud the parts for Act II of “The may 11 on Maple Street.”

Reading Log

The reading log is the daily documentation students complete. The one sentence summary must include the answers to who, what, when, where, and why.

Night Write:
What warning should readers take from this play?
How can this play be a life changing experience?

Reading:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

posted on: May 15, 2006

Wednesday, May 17

Field Day

posted on: May 15, 2006

Tuesday, May 16

Warm Up:
On a scale of 1-10, with 10 being the highest, how would you rate Rod Serling’s “ The may 11 on Maple Street” Act II? Explain.

Activity 1:
Go over the night write: Who are the monsters on Maple Street?
Do you believe people are usually treated as if they are innocent until proven guilty? Explain.

Activity 2:
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and focus on the 5 W’s and H. Students will share this information with the students at their table in the format of a book chat.

Reading Log

The reading log is the daily documentation students complete. The one sentence summary must include the answers to who, what, when, where, and why.

Reading:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

posted on: May 12, 2006

Monday, May 15

Materials:
Literature pg. 676-684
handout with th elesson plans/questions that appear on this blog for today


Warm Up:
On a scale of 1-10, with 10 being the highest, how would you rate Rod Serling’s “ The may 11 on Maple Street” Act 1? Explain.
Activity 1:
Go over the Night Write: How do the people on Maple Street single out Les Goodman? What qualities of his cause the reaction? What does this really suggest what is happening on Maple Street?

Activity 2:
Students are to read the bracketed text silently. What perspective is created during the opening of Act II?
Prediction: Do you predict that the neighbors watching the Goodman house will or will not discover anything suspicious? Explain.
Students will read page 676 silently.

Activity 3:
So far the suspicion has been cast on Goodman.
Prediction: Do you predict the suspicion will end with Goodman? Why or why not?
Students will read page 677 silently.
What does Don reveal about Steve to their neighbors?

What is the tone of Steve’s speech?

What type of conflict does Steve’s tone suggest?

Activity 4:
Students will read pg. 678-679 silently to find the answer to the following:
How do Don’s actions advance the plot to the climax?

What happens to the dark figure that is walking down Maple Street?

Prediction: Is the dark figure an alien?

Activity 5:
Read the 1st twelve lines on page and describe the atmosphere.

Prediction:
What do you think will happen next on Maple Street?

Students will read the rest of pg. 682 silently.

Activity 6:
Students are to read the 1st eight lines on page 683. Turn to pg. 667 and reread the opening camera shot of Maple Street. Compare the way the viewer first sees Maple Street and the way it appears now.
Students will read the rest of pg. 683-684 silently to find out who is watching what is happening on Maple Street?
Where are they watching from?

Students will turn in their handouts for a grade.

Night Write:
Who are the monsters on Maple Street?
Do you believe people are usually treated as if they are innocent until proven guilty? Explain.

Reading:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

posted on: May 10, 2006

Friday, May 12

Materials:
Literature pg. 672-675
handout with th elesson plans/questions that appear on this blog for today


Warm Up:
What are the 1st signs that something strange is happening on Maple Street? How do these signs initiate the conflict on Maple Street?

Activity 1:
Share the Night Write responses with the students at the table. Share the responses to the warm up, too.

Activity 2:
Review the key events in the play so far. Students are to read the 1st twenty lines of the play on pg. 672 to make the following prediction:
How do you think Tommy will fare in the face of the crowd’s growing irritation with him?

Activity 3:
Students will read the 2nd half of pg. 672 to determine what hint does Steve’s comment give about how characters will react later in the play?

Activity 4:
Students will read the 1st half of pg. 673 to determine what forces are in conflict now? How has the nature the conflict changed?
Read the 2nd half of pg. 673 to determine what happens to Goodman’s car?

Activity 5:
Read the bracketed stage directions aloud. Ask students to paraphrase the main idea of this passage. Read the rest of pg. 674 and page 675 to answer the following:
Why is the problem with Les Goodman considered part of the rising action of the plot?
What does Charlie accuse Goodman of?

Students will turn in their handouts for a grade.


Reading:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Night Write:
How do the people on Maple Street single out Les Goodman? What qualities of his cause the reaction? What does this really suggest what is happening on Maple Street?

posted on: May 10, 2006

Thursday, May 11

Materials:
Literature pg. 666-671
Newsprint
marker
handout with the lesson plans/questions that appear on this blog for today

Warm Up:
What is the difference between prejudice and suspicion?

Reading:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log
Night Write:
If you were a resident on Maple Street, how would you have responded to the strange events?

Activity 1:
Review a summary of the play: Hysteria is caused by the community’s prejudice and suspension.
Explain that the narrator’s speech is the one that Rod Serling used to introduce each episode of The Twilight Zone.” Read this paragraph aloud to the students.

Activity 2:
Review the importance of stage directions when reading a play. Students are to reread the stage directions silently on pg. 667 to identify the kinds of directions the stage directions contain.
What is the fifth dimension?
The fifth dimension is the dimension of the imagination.

Activity 3:
Students are to reread the 1st bracketed section on pg. 668 to describe the setting. Why do you think Rod Serling chose this kind of place for the setting of the story?

Prediction: Will the people be able to continue their ordinary lives after the flash in the sky? List the evidence used in determining this prediction.

Activity 4:
Students are to reread the bracketed stage directions on pg. 668 to determine what is happening to the people mentioned in the stage directions.

Activity 5:
Students are to read pg. 668 silently to answer the following:
Do you think the events described in the stage directions are included to move the action forward or to hint that something strange is happening? Explain.

Activity 6:
What is the exposition in the elements of fiction? Students will read pg. 669 silently and answer the following:
How does the playwright use dialogue as the exposition?
What is the inciting incident of the play?
What function does the dialogue serve in the plot? (Read the bracketed passage.)
What strange event occurs just before Maple Street loses electricity?

Activity 7:
3 students will be selected to read the parts of Steve, Tommy, and Charlie. Students are to follow along and answer: What opposing force is introduced here?
Predict what kind of conflicts might result from the threat of an alien presence.
How does a conflict relate to the plot?

Activity 8:
Remember: Foreshadowing gives readers clues about events to come in a literary work.
Students are to read the 1st eight lines on pg. 671. What might these lines foreshadow?
How do Tommy’s words intensify the uneasiness people are feeling?
Identify the element of the plot this text contains.
Rising action

Have students guide a student recorder through the completion of a plot diagram using information read in this play. Use chart paper on the easel to complete this activity.

Students are to read pg. 671 and answer the following:
What does Tommy tell Steve, Don, and Charlie?


posted on: May 10, 2006

Wednesday, May 10

Wednesday, May 10

Materials:
Literature pg. 664-665

Warm Up:
I just heard this morning that the state of Georgia will be extending the school day beginning this August. Write a paragraph explaining your response to this issue.

Activity 1:
Share warm-up responses with the students at your table.

Activity 2:
Play the game of “Gossip.”

Activity 3:
Your emotional response to the warm up and the results of the “Gossip” game are similar to the characters in “The may 11 on Maple Street”.

posted on: April 28, 2006

Tuesday, May 9

Warm Up:

Warm Up:
Share the completed open compare and contrast assignment (Nolan Ryan and Casey) in Think/Pair Share (walk with a partner around the room and share the information you thought about as you completed this asignment).


Activity 1:
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes focusing on 1 character to compare with themselves.


Activity 2:
Students will complete an open compare and contract assignment (their character and themselves). This will become the night write.

Reading:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

posted on: April 28, 2006

Monday, May 8

Literature – pg. 573-576
Newsprint
Markers

Warm Up:
What is the purpose of completing graphic organizers when reading nonfiction material?

Activity 1:
Go over the night write.
What are the special qualities that make Ryan different from other sports stars?

Activity 2:
Working in table groups, students will complete the following chart with facts learned about Nolan Ryan’s life.

Statement Source
Ryan holds almost 50 major league records. Author


Activity 3:
Complete Compare/Contrast Nolan and Casey. This is to be continued for night write.


Reading:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

posted on: April 28, 2006

Friday, May 5

Materials:
Literature – pg. 573-576
Compare/Contrast Nolan Ryan and Student


Warm Up:
List 3 accomplishments of Nolan Ryan.

Activity 1:
Discuss “Nolan Ryan” pg. 573-576 answering the following:
1. Why is Nolan Ryan considered to be a “Texas Treasure”?
2. How do you know the 1st sentence of the 1st paragraph is a fact?
3. Looking at the picture on page 572, what does Ryan’s facial expression tell you about the act of pitching?
4. How do the ballplayers feel about Ryan?
5. Why is Nolan Ryan careful about what he eats?
6. Ryan is carried off the field after throwing his record-breaking 7th no-hitter. What details in the photo pn pg. 574 tell you this is a historic moment?
7. What details or words reveal the author’s bias?
8. Describe Ryan’s personality.

Activity 2:
Complete Compare/Contrast Nolan Ryan and Student


Today is the last day to turn in late work or genre charts.

Night Write:
What are the special qualities that make Ryan different from other sports stars?

Reading:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

posted on: April 28, 2006

Thursday, May 4

Students will go to the media center, complete and turn in their genre chart (if they have not already done so) for a grade, report the total number of books read so far this year for a grade.

Reading:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

posted on: April 28, 2006

Wednesday, May 3

Materials:
Literature – pg. 570-576

Warm Up:
Why are baseball players rated by their statistics?

Activity 1:
Read pg. 570 silently to find the answer to the warm-up question.

Activity 2:
Discuss the meaning of the following vocabulary:
Loaded words
Stereotypes
One-sided arguments
Generalization
Wholesome
Hostility
Endorsements
Obscure

Activity 3:
As a whole class discuss the elements of a biography (pg. 571)
Who is Nolan Ryan?

Activity 4:
Students are to read pg. 573-576 silently and answer the following:
What elements of the author’s bias are found in the biography?
Overall, is the author biased for or against Ryan Nolan? Explain.

Writing and Grammar books were collected.

Night Write:
If you did not finish answering the following in class, please do so as night write.
What elements of the author’s bias are found in the biography?
Overall, is the author biased for or against Ryan Nolan? Explain.

Reading:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary


Bring Writing and Grammar book to turn in to me. Bring literature book to class on Wednesday to use in class.

posted on: April 28, 2006

Monday, May 1

Materials:
“Casey At the Bat”
Numbered lines of the poem for echo reading
Baseball articles
“A League of Their Own”
“Introduction to the Poem”
“ Huge Commotion in Mudville’ – 5 sections
“Casey’s Revenge”
Newsprint

Warm Up:
Name several ways to summarize an article.

Activity 1:
Each table group will have 1 baseball article and complete a concept map including a 1-sentence summary (no more than 15 words).

Bring Writing and Grammar book to turn in to me. Bring literature book to class on Wednesday to use in class.

Have progress reports signed, if you have not already done so.


Night Write:
Complete the following:
Describe a concept map.
A concept map is beneficial to me because I can ___________________________________. I will be able to use concept maps when_________________________________________.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

posted on: April 28, 2006

Tuesday, May 2

Warm Up:
What is the purpose of a concept map?

Activity 1:
Work on concept maps from baseball articles.

Activity 2:
Read your chapter book for 30 minutes and complete the following chart:
Question Response
Who
What
When
Where
Why
How
So what


Bring Literature on Wednesday to use in class

Night Write:
Using the information you wrote on the chart in class, write a summary of your in-class reading including:
Topic sentence with title and author
Answers to 7 questions on the chart
The answer to “so what” will be your concluding sentence.


posted on: April 28, 2006

Friday, April 28

Materials:
“Casey At the Bat”
Numbered lines of the poem for echo reading
Baseball articles
“A League of Their Own”
“Introduction to the Poem”
“ Huge Commotion in Mudville’ – 5 sections
“Casey’s Revenge”
Newsprint

Warm Up:
What is the National Baseball Hall of Fame, and how is someone selected to have this honor?

Activity 1:
Give students an intro into the writing and the audience response of “Casey At the Bat” (see back of book), and read the poem aloud to the students.

Activity 2:
Each student receives a numbered line of the poem. Students stand in a circle around the perimeter of the room. Beginning with line # 1 students read their line orally to the class from where ever they are standing around the perimeter of the room.

Activity 3:
Each table group will have 1 baseball article and complete a concept map including a 1-sentence summary (no more than 15 words).

Bring Literature on Wednesday to use in class

Have progress reports signed.

Night Write:
Write about an exciting baseball play you have made or seen.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

posted on: April 28, 2006

Monday, April 24

Literature – pg. 758-761

Warm Up:
List 3 sets of technical directions you have used in the past month.

Activity 1:
Technical Directions:
• Will include words and phrases that are unfamiliar to the reader
• Terms should be explained in the text or illustrated in the diagram
• Important to read through all of the directions to define any confusing terms and clarify any unclear steps before trying to follow the directions

Activity 2:
Students will follow the following step-by-step directions for making a paper cup:
1. Fold a square piece of paper into a triangle.
2. Place the folded side of the triangle closest to you.
3. Fold the left corner to the middle of the opposite side.
4. Fold the right corner in the same manner to the opposite side.
5. Fold the top flap down on the folded side.
6. Fold the other top flap down on the other side.
7. You should have a paper cup.

Activity 3:
Students will read the top half of page 758 to answer, “What’s in it for me,” with regard to technical directions.

Activity 4:
Students will read the bottom half of page 758 to be able to describe the 4 steps in the process of understanding directions.

Activity 5:
Since students will encounter technical directions when they purchase new products, they must be able to follow the directions for operation and assembly. Students will read the technical directions on page 759 and answer the following:
• List the features of the Alarm Chronograph Timer.
• Why is it important to follow the directions in the correct order?
• List the tasks of button A.
• List the tasks of button B.
• How are these technical directions organized?


Night Write:
Write the directions to setting your alarm clock.
Reading


posted on: April 22, 2006

Tuesday, April 25

Materials:
Large newsprint
Laptops

Warm Up:
How are technical directions important to you?

Activity 1:
Share last night’s night write with the students at your table.

Activity 2:
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes. Students are to record the total number of books read this year, and turn in their genre chart.

Activity 3:
Working in table groups, students are to write the technical directions for writing and submitting an essay into e-rater, directions to using the SmartBoard, downloading and saving pictures from a digital camera to a new file on the computer.

Night Write:
If students have Internet access at home, they are to type their problem-solution persuasive essay into e-rater. Be sure to print a hard copy of this essay.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

posted on: April 22, 2006

Wednesday, April 26

Warm Up:
What reading rate do you use when reading technical directions?

Activity 1:
Working in table groups, students are to write the technical directions for writing and submitting an essay into e-rater, directions to using the SmartBoard, downloading and saving pictures from a digital camera to a new file on the computer.

Night Write:
If students have Internet access at home, they are to type their problem-solution persuasive essay into e-rater. Be sure to print a hard copy of this essay.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

posted on: April 22, 2006

Thursday, April 27

Thursday, April 27

Warm Up:
Appetizers – pg. 51

Activity 1:
Working in table groups, students are to write the technical directions for writing and submitting an essay into e-rater, directions to using the SmartBoard, downloading and saving pictures from a digital camera to a new file on the computer.


Night Write:
If students have Internet access at home, they are to type their problem-solution persuasive essay into e-rater. Be sure to print a hard copy of this essay.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

posted on: April 22, 2006

Friday, April 28

Friday, April 28
Warm Up:
Appetizers – pg. 52

Activity 1:
Working in table groups, students are to write the technical directions for writing and submitting an essay into e-rater, directions to using the SmartBoard, downloading and saving pictures from a digital camera to a new file on the computer.

Activity 2:
Students will swap technical directions with another table and follow the directions. Notes will be written on the directions showing the weaknesses and the strengths of the directions.

Bring Writing and Grammar to class on Monday to turn in to me.

Bring Literature on Wednesday to use in class.

Night Write:
If students have Internet access at home, they are to type their problem-solution persuasive essay into e-rater. Be sure to print a hard copy of this essay. All essays must be submitted by Monday, May 1.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary


posted on: April 22, 2006

Monday, March 13

Materials:
Best Nonfiction – 1-5

Warm Up:
Appetizers – pg. 46

Handouts:
Anticipation Guide for Cyberspace

Activity 1:
With a partner students will complete the 1st column of the Anticipation Guide. The student responses will be shared with the entire group.

Activity 2:
Review computer terms:
World Wide Web
Internet
Hypertext markup language

Activity 3:
An introduction of the nonfiction story “Where Is Cyberspace?” will be given. Students will get a sense of the author’s purpose, content, and organization of a piece of nonfiction. Students will learn how to evaluate and respond to nonfiction writing.

Activity 4:
Students will preview the story to by answering the following questions:
What is the article about?
What can I learn from reading “Where Is Cyberspace?”

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Night Write:
Using the Night Write from the weekend add 15 minutes more to the writing.

posted on: March 12, 2006

Tuesday, March 14

Materials:
Best Nonfiction – 1-5

Handout:
Anticipation Guide For “Where Is Cyberspace?”

Warm Up:
Write 5 facts you know about cyberspace.

Activity 1:
Give One Get One
Students get up and give an answer to the warm-up question with another student. The “giver” then gets an answer from that person. This activity continues until each student has a total of ten items on their list.


Activity 2:
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes to identify the following in their reading:
Conflict
Issue
Protagonist
Antagonist
Resolution

Activity 3:
Students will read “Where Is Cyberspace?” and focus on answering the following questions:
Why did the author write this article?
Who is the author’s intended audience?
What information does the article present?
How is the information organized?
How well has the author presented the information?
Has she answered any or all of the questions that you have about cyberspace?
Has she achieved her purpose for writing the article? Why or why not?

After reading “Where Is Cyberspace?” students will skim through the article and correct and/or verify the statements on the Anticipation Guide for “Where Is Cyberspace?”

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Night Write:
Using the Night Write from Monday add 15 minutes more to the writing. Does this piece of writing look like you have written for 45 minutes?

posted on: March 12, 2006

Wednesday, March 15

Materials:
Best Nonfiction: 1-17

Handouts:
Anticipation Guide for Cyberspace
Night Writes for the rest of March

Warm Up:
What are the elements in a nonfiction writing piece?

Activity 1:
Students will share their responses on Anticipation Guide for Cyberspace with their table group.

Activity 2:
Students will skim “Where Is Cyberspace?” to review the information. In table groups students will complete the “Review and Interpretation” on the story.

Activity 3:
Students will read Best Nonfiction: 13-15 and discuss “Purpose” and “Audience” of this nonfiction piece of writing. In table groups students will answer the questions in Exercise 1 on pages 15 and 16.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Night Write: March Night Writes

1. Select a topic that you already have a great deal of knowledge or have recently researched.
2. Write a few sentences that describe your audience and your purpose for writing. Do you want to address people who share your enthusiasm for your chosen topic or those who are unfamiliar with it? Do you want to inform, persuade, or entertain?
3. What is the approximate age of your intended audience?
4. Use a concept map, or web, to organize your ideas about your topic. Write your topic in the center square. Then add the subtopics (key words from your research paper) you wrote questions about in the introductory writing exercise. These subtopics should answer the most basic questions that your readers might have about your topic. Add any new subtopics you now think belong there.
5. Save your notes and your concept map for your next required writing piece.


Materials:
Best Nonfiction: 1-17

Handouts:
Anticipation Guide for Cyberspace
Night Writes for the rest of March

Warm Up:
What are the elements in a nonfiction writing piece?

Activity 1:
Students will share their responses on Anticipation Guide for Cyberspace with their table group.

Activity 2:
Students will skim “Where Is Cyberspace?” to review the information. In table groups students will complete the “Review and Interpretation” on the story.

Activity 3:
Students will read Best Nonfiction: 13-15 and discuss “Purpose” and “Audience” of this nonfiction piece of writing. In table groups students will answer the questions in Exercise 1 on pages 15 and 16.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Night Write:
1. Select a topic that you already have a great deal of knowledge or have recently researched.
2. Write a few sentences that describe your audience and your purpose for writing. Do you want to address people who share your enthusiasm for your chosen topic or those who are unfamiliar with it? Do you want to inform, persuade, or entertain?
3. What is the approximate age of your intended audience?
4. Use a concept map, or web, to organize your ideas about your topic. Write your topic in the center square. Then add the subtopics (key words from your research paper) you wrote questions about in the introductory writing exercise. These subtopics should answer the most basic questions that your readers might have about your topic. Add any new subtopics you now think belong there.
5. Save your notes and your concept map for your next required writing piece.


Materials:
Best Nonfiction: 1-17

Handouts:
Anticipation Guide for Cyberspace
Night Writes for the rest of March

Warm Up:
What are the elements in a nonfiction writing piece?

Activity 1:
Students will share their responses on Anticipation Guide for Cyberspace with their table group.

Activity 2:
Students will skim “Where Is Cyberspace?” to review the information. In table groups students will complete the “Review and Interpretation” on the story.

Activity 3:
Students will read Best Nonfiction: 13-15 and discuss “Purpose” and “Audience” of this nonfiction piece of writing. In table groups students will answer the questions in Exercise 1 on pages 15 and 16.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Night Write:
1. Select a topic that you already have a great deal of knowledge or have recently researched.
2. Write a few sentences that describe your audience and your purpose for writing. Do you want to address people who share your enthusiasm for your chosen topic or those who are unfamiliar with it? Do you want to inform, persuade, or entertain?
3. What is the approximate age of your intended audience?
4. Use a concept map, or web, to organize your ideas about your topic. Write your topic in the center square. Then add the subtopics (key words from your research paper) you wrote questions about in the introductory writing exercise. These subtopics should answer the most basic questions that your readers might have about your topic. Add any new subtopics you now think belong there.
5. Save your notes and your concept map for your next required writing piece.


Materials:
Best Nonfiction: 1-17

Handouts:
Anticipation Guide for Cyberspace
Night Writes for the rest of March

Warm Up:
What are the elements in a nonfiction writing piece?

Activity 1:
Students will share their responses on Anticipation Guide for Cyberspace with their table group.

Activity 2:
Students will skim “Where Is Cyberspace?” to review the information. In table groups students will complete the “Review and Interpretation” on the story.

Activity 3:
Students will read Best Nonfiction: 13-15 and discuss “Purpose” and “Audience” of this nonfiction piece of writing. In table groups students will answer the questions in Exercise 1 on pages 15 and 16.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Night Write:
1. Select a topic that you already have a great deal of knowledge or have recently researched.
2. Write a few sentences that describe your audience and your purpose for writing. Do you want to address people who share your enthusiasm for your chosen topic or those who are unfamiliar with it? Do you want to inform, persuade, or entertain?
3. What is the approximate age of your intended audience?
4. Use a concept map, or web, to organize your ideas about your topic. Write your topic in the center square. Then add the subtopics (key words from your research paper) you wrote questions about in the introductory writing exercise. These subtopics should answer the most basic questions that your readers might have about your topic. Add any new subtopics you now think belong there.
5. Save your notes and your concept map for your next required writing piece.

Handouts:
Anticipation Guide for Cyberspace
Night Writes for the rest of March

Warm Up:
What are the elements in a nonfiction writing piece?

Activity 1:
Students will share their responses on Anticipation Guide for Cyberspace with their table group.

Activity 2:
Students will skim “Where Is Cyberspace?” to review the information. In table groups students will complete the “Review and Interpretation” on the story.

Activity 3:
Students will read Best Nonfiction: 13-15 and discuss “Purpose” and “Audience” of this nonfiction piece of writing. In table groups students will answer the questions in Exercise 1 on pages 15 and 16.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Night Write:
1. Select a topic that you already have a great deal of knowledge or have recently researched.
2. Write a few sentences that describe your audience and your purpose for writing. Do you want to address people who share your enthusiasm for your chosen topic or those who are unfamiliar with it? Do you want to inform, persuade, or entertain?
3. What is the approximate age of your intended audience?
4. Use a concept map, or web, to organize your ideas about your topic. Write your topic in the center square. Then add the subtopics (key words from your research paper) you wrote questions about in the introductory writing exercise. These subtopics should answer the most basic questions that your readers might have about your topic. Add any new subtopics you now think belong there.
5. Save your notes and your concept map for your next required writing piece.

posted on: March 12, 2006

Thursday, March 16

Students will go to the media center to check out a book on their independent reading level and in a genre they have not read so far this year. Students will receive instruction on the elements of nonfiction (purpose, audience, content, organization, response, and evaluation) and how to read nonfiction.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Night Write: March Night Writes

Fine-tune your concept map.

posted on: March 12, 2006

Friday, March 17

Materials:
Best Nonfiction: 17-21

Warm Up:
What is a controlling idea in a piece of nonfiction writing?

Activity 1:
Share concept maps with the students at your table.

Activity 2:
Students will read Best Nonfiction: 17-19 to answer the following:
Why do authors change their writing strategies?
Describe the 5 forms of organization.
How does the author support her opinion?
How does the author conclude the piece of writing?

Activity 3:
Exercise 2 on page 20 will be completed as a whole class.

Night Write: March Night Writes

Students will review the concept map you completed for your night write on Wednesday, March 15. Using the facts from your research paper, add at least 2 details to each subtopic. Think about the organization you will use:
Chronological order
Spacial order
Order of importance
Cause-and-effect order
Problem-solution order

Put a number next to each subtopic to show where each will come in your article. Are any of your details opinions? If so, do you have facts to back them up? To make sure you have at least 1 fact to back up 1 opinion, highlight the facts (statement that can be proved). Save these notes for the next writing piece.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

posted on: March 12, 2006

Monday, March 20

Materials:
Best Nonfiction: pg. 13, 21-23

Warm Up:
Why is it important to make sure you have content and organization when writing an informational piece?

Activity 1:
Share last night’s night write with the people at your table.

Activity 2:
Read “How to Read Nonfiction” reviewing for:
Purpose and audience
Content and organization
Response and evaluation

Activity 3:
Read and discuss the information on pg. 21-22 on response and evaluation.

Activity 4:
Remember that proficient readers question continually as they read. Skim “Where Is Cyberspace?” and answer the following:
1. What is the author’s purpose?
2. Did the author achieve her purpose?
3. Give specific examples from the article to support your answer.
4. What are some of the strengths in this article?
5. What are some of the weaknesses of this article?

Night Write: March Night Writes
Review your content map.
Answer the following”
1. Are the facts on the concept map related to your intended purpose?
2. If not, decide how you will bring your notes and purpose together.
3. Imagine yourself a member of the chosen audience, and look at your concept map. What are some additional questions your audience might have?
4. If additional questions would help clarify your topic, add those questions at this time.
5. How did you organize your information? (example , chronological)
6. Is the type of organization appropriate for your topic and purpose?
7. Should the order be changed?
8. What subtopics might need to be rearranged?

Save this information for the next writing piece.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

posted on: March 12, 2006

Tuesday, March 21

Warm Up:
Why is it important to make sure you have respond and evaluate when reading an informational piece?

Activity 1:
Share last night’s night write with the people at your table.

Activity 2: Students will read their chapter books and answer the following:
What is the problem or issue presented in the story/text?
If you had the same conflict, how would you resolve it?
Who is the protagonist?
Who is the antagonist?
What do you predict will be the solution?

A detailed review and modeling of how detailed these questions need to be answered will be shared with the students. Students will be asked to restate the question in each of their answers, when completing this assignment. This assignment will be collected in class.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Night Write:
Take a writing vacation.

posted on: March 12, 2006

Wednesday, March 22

Materials:
Write Source – 225-229

Warm Up:
What is a problem-solution persuasive essay?

Activity 1:
The class will read and analyze the example of a persuasive (or problem-solution) essay on pages 225-226.
When analyzing the piece of writing, students will be asked to answer the following:
1. Paragraph 1: What is the problem?
2. Paragraph 2: Why is it important?
3. Paragraph 3: What is a solution? Why will it work?
4. Paragraph 4: How can the reader help?
5. Paragraph 5: Why might someone think the solution will not work?
6. What does the writer want the reader to do?
7. What details convince the reader to take the problem seriously?
8. What details persuade the reader to help solve the problem?
9. Which paragraphs deal with the problem?
10. Which paragraphs deal with the solution?
11. What words or phrases make the voice of the writer persuasive?

Activity 2:
Review the keys to effective prewriting on pg. 227. Get out your concept map you worked on while reading “Where Is Cyberspace?” and compare it to the concept map (called a “topics cluster” in Write Source). Using the information on your concept map, complete a gathering chart (see pg. 229 in Write Source on page 229. You will need to refer back to your research paper for more information.
Gathering Chart

Problem: The school might cancel the Jekyll Island trip.
Why does the problem exist? Why should the problem be solved?
The Jekyll Island trip cost $180. Without the Jekyll Island trip, students wouldn’t get to do the outdoor projects.
Next year the trip will cost $300. Money should be no object when it comes to educating students.
The school budget has been cut. Nature is the place to learn about nature;. Therefore, the issue here is priority on where the money should be spent.
The economy has been bad. A bad economy should not impact what is best for kids.
Everybody goes or nobody goes. Srudents want to us to save the camp experience, too.


The 1st part of a problem-solution essay should convince the reader a problem exists. The 2nd part of the essay should propose a solution that the reader could do. Organizing your details carefully will help the writer make their essay clear and persuasive.

Night Write: March Night Writes

Complete the gathering chart that was started in class.

posted on: March 12, 2006

Thursday, March 23

Materials:
Write Source: pg. 230-232

Warm Up:
What is the purpose of an opinion statement?

Activity 1:
Since a problem can be solved with several possible solutions, making a list of possible solutions would be beneficial. You will need to begin with a sentence starter.

Sentence Starter
The Jekyll Island trip will not be an option for next year unless…
• The economy gets better.
• The school budget cuts something else.
• Parents make donations.
• Students figure out fundraisers to help pay for the cam experience.
• A miracle happens
Students will need to use a sentence starter to state their problem and ends with “unless” or “until.” Refer to your research paper and write as many solutions as you can. Put a star by the solution you feel is most workable.

Activity 2:
Students will now need to figure out how the solution will work. In order to persuade your reader to believe in your solution, you will need to complete the following chart:

5W’s and H Chart

Gathering Details About the Solution
Who Dr. Tyson, 7th grade teachers, 7th grade students
What Money for the Jekyll Island trip
Where Mabry
When Present
Why So students will have the nature experience in Jekyll.
How Asking for donations or having fund-raisers


Night Write: March Night Writes

Students will need to complete the Sentence Starter Solutions and the 5W’s and H Chart.

posted on: March 12, 2006

Friday, March 24

Materials:
Materials:
Write Source: pg. 231-235.

Warm Up:
Why is it the necessary to write clear and focused statements?

Activity 1:
Read and discuss the necessity of writing clear and focused statements on pg. 231.

Activity 2:
An opinion statement names the problem and proposes a solution.
Students will use the following formula to write an opinion statement.

Activity 3:
Students will see the example of a completed Organized List for a persuasive essay. Students will use the follow directions to guide them in generating an organized list for their essay:

Directions Organized List
Write your opinion statement.
Summarize the problem.
List facts and details.
Propose the solution.
List facts and details.
Continue the solution.
List facts and details.

Reading Logs were collected for a grade on 5 entries.


Night Write:
March Night Writes
Students will need to complete their organized list. This list will be used as a guide with the writing of this essay. Keep in mind that every paragraph will need a topic sentence related to the essay topic. Each paragraph will need to have facts and details that support its topic sentence. Every paragraph needs to have a closing (or clincher) sentence that summarizes the information written in that one paragraph.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary


Activity 3:
Students will see the example of a completed Organized List for a persuasive essay. Students will use the follow directions to guide them in generating an organized list for their essay:

Directions Organized List
Write your opinion statement.
Summarize the problem.
List facts and details.
Propose the solution.
List facts and details.
Continue the solution.
List facts and details.


Night Write:
Students will need to complete their organized list. This list will be used as a guide with the writing of this essay. Keep in mind that every paragraph will need a topic sentence related to the essay topic. Each paragraph will need to have facts and details that support its topic sentence. Every paragraph needs to have a closing (or clincher) sentence that summarizes the information written in that one paragraph.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

posted on: March 12, 2006

Monday, March 27

Materials:
Write Source: pg. 233-235

Handout:
Guidelines For Writing a Persuasive Paper (pg. 1 of this document)

Warm Up:
Appetizers – pg. 46

Activity 1:
The class will read and discuss the keys to effective writing. We will determine which ones we need to complete now.

Activity 2:
Students will read “Getting the Big Picture” on page 233. Review what specific information must be included in each paragraph.

Students will take out a sheet of notebook paper and fold it into fourths. Label each section with the 4 ways to start an opening paragraph.
Ask a question Quote someone
Share an experience Give background information

Students will write 4 different leads for their persuasive paper. Students will ask their writing buddy which lead is the most effective for the essay.

Activity 3:
Students will write the 1st draft of their beginning paragraph to their problem-solution persuasive essay. Be sure to:

Use the lead your writing buddy suggested
Introduce the problem
Put your opinion statement as the last sentence
Make sure this paragraph has 5-7 sentences.

Night Write:
March Night Writes
Students will complete the 1st draft of their problem-solution persuasive essay. Be sure to:
• Use the lead your writing buddy suggested
• Introduce the problem
• Put your opinion statement as the last sentence
• Make sure this paragraph has 5-7 sentences.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

posted on: March 12, 2006

Tuesday, March 28

Warm Up:
Since this problem-solution persuasive essay is the last required piece of writing this school year, I want to ...

Handout:
Guidelines For Writing a Persuasive Paper (pg. 1 of this document)

Collected Papers To Be Graded:
Today's Warm-up
2 5W's and H Charts (one on the problem and one on the solution for the essay)

Activity 1:
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes have students write a summary paragraph including a topic sentence, supporting details (5 W’s and H), and a clincher/closing sentence.

Activity 2:
Share the rough draft of the beginning paragraph with the students at your table.

Night Write:
March Night Writes
Fine-tune your beginning paragraph making sure you:
• Use one of the 4 suggested leads the lead
o Ask a question
o Share an experience
o Quote someone
o Give background information
• Introduce the problem
• Put your opinion statement as the last sentence
• Make sure this paragraph has 5-7 sentences.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

posted on: March 12, 2006

Wednesday, March 29

Materials:
Write Source: pg. 236-237

Handout:
Guidelines For Writing a Persuasive Paper (pg. 1 of this document)

Warm Up:
Why must the writer be sure they are anticipating and addressing readers concerns and counter-arguments when writing a problem-solution persuasive paper?

Activity 1:
• Students will write the numbers 1 through 3 down the left side of their paper, leaving eight lines between each number.
• Write one topic sentence next to each number.
• List the facts and examples (refer to your Organized List) in each paragraph that support the topic sentence.
• Compare lists with your writing buddy.

Activity 2:
Students will write the 1st rough draft of their middle paragraphs. Students must remember the following guidelines when writing each of the middle paragraphs:
• 1st middle paragraph
o Topic sentence summarizes the problem
o Body convinces the reader with details that support the topic sentence
o Closing sentence states why the problem needs a solution
• 2nd middle paragraph
o Topic sentence
o Introduces a solution
o Closing/clincher sentence
• 3rd middle paragraph
o Topic sentence
o Offers details about the solution
o Closing/clincher sentence

Night Write:
Complete the 1st rough draft of the 3 middle paragraphs for a problem-solution persuasive paper keeping the following in mind:
• 1st middle paragraph
o Topic sentence summarizes the problem
o Body convinces the reader with details that support the topic sentence
o Closing sentence states why the problem needs a solution
• 2nd middle paragraph
o Topic sentence
o Introduces a solution
o Closing/clincher sentence
• 3rd middle paragraph
o Topic sentence
o Offers details about the solution
o Closing/clincher sentence

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

posted on: March 12, 2006

Thursday, March 30

Students went to the media center to check outbooks in a needed genre and at a challenging reading level. Mrs. Hendrix gave instruction on how to set up and complete a puzzle PowerPoint on a famous person. The directions for this lesson are posted on the media center blog.

Night Write:
Students must make sure they have completed a rough draft of the 1st paragraph and the 3 middle paragraphs of their problem-solution persuasive essay (writing in pencil, every other line, and in cursive).


Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

posted on: March 12, 2006

Friday, March 31

Materials:
Write Source: pg. 239-250

Handout:
Guidelines For Writing a Persuasive Paper (pg. 1 of this document)


Write Source: pg. 238

Handout:
Guidelines For Writing a Persuasive Paper (pg. 1 of this document)

Warm Up:
Why must a writer of a problem-solution persuasive paper provide a sense of closure to the writing?

Activity 1:
Read page 238 paying close attention to:
• How would you summarize the problem and solution presented in the paper?
• How would you suggest a possible objection to the solution?
• How would you answer your objection?
• How would you write the answer as an ending to your essay?

Some people say ___________________, but the fact is _____________,
(objection) (answer)

Activity 2:
Students will write the 1st rough draft of the ending paragraph to their essay.

Night Write:
Fine-tune the ending paragraph of your essay emphasizing:
• How would you summarize the problem and solution presented in the paper?
• How would you suggest a possible objection to the solution?
• How would you answer your objection?
• How would you write the answer as an ending to your essay?

Some people say ____________________, but the fact is ____________
(objection) (answer)

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

posted on: March 12, 2006

Monday, April 10

Materials:
Write Source: pg. 239-250

Handout:
Guidelines For Writing a Persuasive Paper (pg. 1 of this document)

Revising Checklist (pg. 2 of this document)

Warm Up:
Appetizers - 48

Review the first 5 activities. Students should have revised their paper 5 times before spring break. If they did not, they are to revise it today by the following activities. Please use Write Source pg. 240-244.

Activity 1:
Students will be revising their paper focusing on the answer to:
How did I use details to persuade?

Activity 2:
Students will be revising their paper focusing on the answer to:
How did I answer the main objection?

Activity 3:
Students will be revising their paper focusing on the answer to:
How did my beginning capture my reader’s attention?

Activity 4:
Students will be revising their paper focusing on the answer to:
How does my ending contain a clear call to action?

Activity 5:
Students will be revising their paper focusing on the answer to:
How can my voice sound more confident?

Activity 6:
Students will be revising their paper focusing on the answer to:
How can my voice sound more persuasive?

Activity 7:
Students will be revising their paper focusing on the answer to:
What are my inflammatory words and phrases?
How are my words engaging, positive, and fit my audience and purpose?

Activity 8:
Students will be revising their paper focusing on the answer to:
How do I make sure my words fit my audience and purpose?
Which words did I use that are inflammatory?
Which words did I use that are too formal or too casual?

Activity 9:
Students will be revising their paper focusing on the answer to:
How do I use compound sentences?
How many compound sentences do I have?

Activity 10:
Students will be revising their paper focusing on the answer to:
How do I use my complex sentences?
How many complex sentences do I have?

Students should remember: the rough draft must show significant signs of revisions.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary
Night Write:
Students will use the following activities to complete the revising of their paper:

Activity 1:
Students will be revising their paper focusing on the answer to:
How did I use details to persuade?

Activity 2:
Students will be revising their paper focusing on the answer to:
How did I answer the main objection?

Activity 3:
Students will be revising their paper focusing on the answer to:
How did my beginning capture my reader’s attention?

Activity 4:
Students will be revising their paper focusing on the answer to:
How does my ending contain a clear call to action?

Activity 5:
Students will be revising their paper focusing on the answer to:
How can my voice sound more confident?

All students will need to revise their papers according to the following activities. Please use Write Source pg. 245-249.

Activity 6:
Students will be revising their paper focusing on the answer to:
How can my voice sound more persuasive?

Activity 7:
Students will be revising their paper focusing on the answer to:
What are my inflammatory words and phrases?
How are my words engaging, positive, and fit my audience and purpose?

Activity 8:
Students will be revising their paper focusing on the answer to:
How do I make sure my words fit my audience and purpose?
Which words did I use that are inflammatory?
Which words did I use that are too formal or too casual?

Activity 9:
Students will be revising their paper focusing on the answer to:
How do I use compound sentences?
How many compound sentences do I have?

Activity 10:
Students will be revising their paper focusing on the answer to:
How do I use my complex sentences?
How many complex sentences do I have?

posted on: March 12, 2006

Tuesday, April 11

Warm Up:
Appetizers – pg. 49

Handouts:
Guidelines For Writing a Persuasive Paper (pg. 1 of this document)
Handouts:
Editing Checklist (pg. 2 of this document)
(A completed 1 from the writer of the paper and a clean copy for the writing buddy to use and the writing buddy revises the paper on the Editing Checklist).


Activity 1:
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes have students write a summary paragraph including a topic sentence, supporting details (5 W’s and H), and a clincher/closing sentence.

Activity 2:
Students should share their revised rough draft with the students at their table.

Activity 3:
Students should get with their writing buddy and exchange papers. The writing buddy is to complete a copy of Guidelines for Writing of a Persuasive Paper.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Night Write:
If your reading buddy did not finish all of the activities of the revising, please have someone at home assist you in this matter.

posted on: March 12, 2006

Wednesday, April 12

Materials:
Write Source – pg. 252-253

Handouts:
Editing Checklist (pg. 3 of this document)

Warm Up:
Why is it important to revise a persuasive writing piece?

Activity 1:
Students will complete their Editing Checklist handout to complete the editing activities on their rough draft.
1. Students will be editing their paper focusing on the answer to:
How do I know that I used proper grammar and punctuation?

2. Students will be editing their paper focusing on the answer to:
How do I know if my essay is free of spelling errors?

3. Students will be editing their paper focusing on the answer to:
How did I punctuate compound sentences?


4. Students will be editing their paper focusing on the answer to:
How did I punctuate complex sentences?

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Night Write:
Students will complete the Editing Checklist (pg. 3 of this document)
for their persuasive essay.

posted on: March 12, 2006

Monday, April 17, 2006

Materials:
Write Source – pg. 252-253

Handouts:
Editing Checklist (pg. 3 of this document)


Warm Up:
Why is it important to edit a persuasive writing piece?

Activity 1:
Students will get with their writing buddy and exchange papers. Students will complete an Editing Checklist for their writing buddy.
1. Students will be editing their paper focusing on the answer to:
How do I know that I used proper grammar and punctuation?

2. Students will be editing their paper focusing on the answer to:
How do I know if my essay is free of spelling errors?

3. Students will be editing their paper focusing on the answer to:
How did I punctuate compound sentences?
4. Students will be editing their paper focusing on the answer to:
How did I punctuate complex sentences?

Night Write:
If your reading buddy did not finish all of the activities of the Editing Checklist (pg. 3 of this document),
please have someone at home assist you in this matter. Read your essay aloud to someone else.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

posted on: March 12, 2006

Tuesday, April 18, 2006

Materials:
Writing and Grammar – pg. 416

Warm Up:
What is a subject complement?

Activity 1:
Review predicate nouns and pronouns by reading aloud pg. 416. Work Exercise 40 together as a class.

Activity 2:
Have students complete Grammar Exercise Workbook pg. 65-66. The class will go over the correct answers to these workbook pages.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Night Write:
It is time to take a break from revising and editing your essay. Let’s let it :simmer” for the weekend.

posted on: March 12, 2006

Monday, April 17

Materials:
Writing and Grammar – pg. 417
Rough draft for the problem-solution persuasive essay.

Warm Up:
What is a predicate adjective?

Activity 1:
Review predicate adjectives by reading aloud pg. 417. Work Exercise 41 together as a class.

Activity 2:
Students will read their rough draft aloud to their writing buddy and make any necessary changes.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Night Write:
Fine-tune the rough draft of your essay.

posted on: March 12, 2006

Tuesday, April 18

Activity 1:
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes focusing on the setting. Students will complete the following formula on their reading and turn in this assignment for a grade:
Setting = time and place

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Night Write:
Take a writing vacation.

posted on: March 12, 2006

Wednesday, April 19, 2006

Materials:
Writing and Grammar - pg. 416
Grammar Exercise Workbook - pg. 65

Warm Up:
What is a subject complement?

Activity 1:
Review predicate nouns and pronouns by reading pg. 416. Work Exercise 40 together as a group.

Activity 2:
Students will complete Grammar Exercise Workbook - pg. 65 with their table group.

Activity 3:
Students will complete Grammar Exercise Workbook - pg. 66 as a quiz.


Night Write:
If students have Internet access at home, they are to type their problem-solution persuasive essay into e-rater. Be sure to print a hard copy of this essay.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

posted on: March 12, 2006

Thursday, April 20, 2006

Students will go to the media center to:
update their genre chart
check out a challenging chapter book in a genre they need
receive instruction from Mrs. Hendrix on technical reading and writing

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

posted on: March 12, 2006

Friday, April 21

Friday, April 21
Students must submit their essay to e-rater (http://www.phsuccessnet.com )and print a hard copy of the essay. Students will have access to 6 computers in the classroom.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

posted on: March 12, 2006

Monday. March 6

Materials:
Write Source
Writing and Grammar
Literature

Activity 1:
Presentations


Activity 2:
Test Direction Vocabulary Words

Students will work in partners to create a visual to teach one of the above test direction words.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Night Write:
Complete Expository Writing Reflection Log
for the writing of your expository writing/research paper.

Students will work in partners to create a visual to teach one of the above test direction words.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Night Write:
Complete reflection log for the writing of your expository writing/research paper.

posted on: March 05, 2006

Tuesday, March 7

Warm Up:
Appetizers pg. 45

Students turned in their reading logs and the total number of books read so far this year was recorded.

Activity 1:
Presentations

Activity 2:
Students will read their chapter books and answer the following:
What is the problem or issue presented in the story/text?
If you had the same conflict, how would you resolve it?
Who is the protagonist?
Who is the antagonist?
What do you predict will be the solution?

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Night Write:
Students will read for 30 minutes and answer the following questions on notebook paper. This assignment will be counted for a homework grade.

What is the problem or issue presented in the story/text?
If you had the same conflict, how would you resolve it?
Who is the protagonist?
Who is the antagonist?
What do you predict will be the solution?

posted on: March 05, 2006

Wednesday, March 8

Materials:
Writing and Grammar
Literature
Write Source

Warm Up:
Make a list of the 5 most difficult words from the Test Direction Vocabulary Words.
What will you do in order to learn these words?

Activity 1:
Share warm up responses with you table group.

Activity 2:
Students will present their words to the class.

Test Direction Vocabulary Words will be given on Friday, March 10.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Night Write:
Make a list of the 5 most difficult words from the Test Direction Vocabulary.
What will you do in order to learn these words?
Add this list with your warm-up assignment from today in class. What do you need to do now?

posted on: March 05, 2006

Thursday, March 9

Warm Up:
Make a list of the 5 words from the Test Direction Vocabulary Words that are still a challenge for you. What will you do in order to learn these words?

Activity 1:
Students will discuss their responses to the Warm Up with the students at their table.

Activity 2:
Students will complete
Vocab-o-gram pg. 2 of file to assist them in their preparation of the test.
A test of the Test Direction Vocabulary Words will be given on Friday, March 10.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Night Write:
Do what is necessary in order to prepare for the test on Friday.

posted on: March 05, 2006

Friday, March 10

Students will have the entire class period to complete the Vocab-o-gram pg. 1 of file.


Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Night Write:
You may write on a topic of your choice.

posted on: March 05, 2006

Friday, March 3

Materials:
Write Source
Writing and Grammar
Literature

Activity 1:
Presentations

Activity 2:
Test Direction Vocabulary Words:
1. Identify
2. Word usage
3. Antonym
4. Synonym
5. Word meaning
6. Verb tenses
7. Verb forms
8. Subject-verb agreement
9. Context clues
10. Multi-meaning words
11. Pronoun-antecedent agreement
12. Demonstrative pronouns
13. Relative pronouns
14. Double negative
15. Etymology
16. Connotation
17. Figurative language
18. Interpret text
19. Salutation in a letter
20. Signal words
21. Text structure
22. Draw conclusion
23. Inferences
24. Theme
25. Genre


Students will work in partners to create a visual to teach one of the above test direction words.

Activity 3:
Students will update their Genre Chart and staple it into their portfolio. This chart must be completed by the end of the year.

Book Swap Shop:
At Mabry we are setting up a book swap shop, where students can bring a book and get a book. Therefore, we want to set this shop up and try to open right after spring break. Students are asked to bring in books to donate and place in the box as they enter the 7th grade area.
Happy Reading

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Tonight’s Night Write for 15 minutes will be to your oral presentation, if you have not yet presented.

posted on: February 24, 2006

Thursday, March 2

Activity 1:
Presentations

Activity 2:
Students will go to the media center with their Genre Chart
in hand. Students will select a novel in a genre they have not read so far this year. This will be the next book to be read in their 25 book goal.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Tonight’s Night Write for 15 minutes will be to your oral presentation, if you have not yet presented.

posted on: February 24, 2006

Wednesday, March 1

Materials:
Write Source
Writing and Grammar
Literature

Warm up:
Appetizers - pg. 44
Where is my Genre Chart? How complete is this chart?

Activity 1:
Presentations

Activity 2:
Test Direction Vocabulary Words:
1. Identify
2. Word usage
3. Antonym
4. Synonym
5. Word meaning
6. Verb tenses
7. Verb forms
8. Subject-verb agreement
9. Context clues
10. Multi-meaning words
11. Pronoun-antecedent agreement
12. Demonstrative pronouns
13. Relative pronouns
14. Double negative
15. Etymology
16. Connotation
17. Figurative language
18. Interpret text
19. Salutation in a letter
20. Signal words
21. Text structure
22. Draw conclusion
23. Inferences
24. Theme
25. Genre


Students will work in partners to create a visual to teach one of the above test direction words.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Tonight’s Night Write for 15 minutes will be to your oral presentation, if you have not yet presented.

posted on: February 24, 2006

Tuesday, February 28

Material:
Writing and Grammar Workbook pg. 62 and 64

Warm Up:
Appetizers pg. 43
Where is my Genre Chart? How complete is this chart?


Activity 1:
Presentations

Activity 2:
Students will take a quiz on indirect objects.

Activity 3:
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes focusing on:
What is the author trying to tell me in this book?

What did the author have to know to write this book?

What kind of person do you feel the author is?

What specific facts from the story make you feel this way?

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Tonight’s Night Write for 15 minutes will be to complete ypur oral presentation, if you have not yet presented.

posted on: February 24, 2006

Monday, February 27

Material:
Writing and Grammar Workbook pg. 61 and 63

Warm Up:
What is an indirect object?
Where is my Genre Chart? How complete is this chart?

Students will have a quiz on indirect objects on Tuesday, February 28.

Activity 1:
Presentations

Activity 2:
Using the “Smart Board” students will have an interactive review lesson on indirect objects.

Activity 3:
In their table groups students will complete Writing and Grammar Workbook pg. 61 and 63.


Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Tonight’s Night Write for 15 minutes will be to work on your oral presentation, if you have not yet presented.

posted on: February 24, 2006

February 21-24

Reading Skills activities during the week of the Jekyll Island trip

posted on: February 24, 2006

Thursday, February 16

Presentations

Catch Up day on indirect objects or more review.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Tonight’s Night Write for 15 minutes will be to complete Criteria for an Oral Presentation

posted on: February 12, 2006

Wednesday, February 15

Material:
http://www.phsuccessnet.com
Writing and Grammar pg. 414-415
Gift of Words

Warm Up:
How do you identify indirect objects in a sentence?

Activity 1:
Presentations

Activity 2:
Students should remember the following:
1. There is never an indirect object unless there is a direct object.
2. Indirect objects and objects of the preposition are not the same.
3. Indirect objects can be found easily by rewording a sentence to include the word to or for.
4. An indirect object is a noun or a pronoun.

Activity 3:
Using an integrative “Smart” board, students will complete the exercises on pg. 415 in Writing and Grammar.

Homework:
Have progress report signed and return it to me on Thursday.

Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Tonight’s Night Write for 15 minutes will be to complete Criteria for an Oral Presentation

http://www.phsuccessnet.com

posted on: February 12, 2006

Tuesday, February 14

Warm Up:
Appetizers pg. 42

Activity 1:
Students will complete a quiz on direct objects.

Activity 2:
Students will read their chapter book for 30 min. and answer the following questions about the characters in their reading:
Who are the main characters/people in the story/text?
Do I like them? Why or why not?
Do any of the characters /people change in the story/text? How?
Does a character/person do things that are good or bad? What kind of things?

Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log: Reading logs will be checked this Thursday, February 16 for days Monday, February 13 – Wednesday, February 15.
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Tonight’s Night Write for 15 minutes will be to prepare for their Oral Presentation.

posted on: February 12, 2006

Monday, February 13

http://www.phsuccessnet.comWriting and Grammar pg. 410-413, and 316

Warm Up:
What is a direct object?

Activity 1:
Students will see the words complement and complete written on the board. Both words come from the same Latin word and their meanings are related. A complement makes something complete. Students will be directed to page 316 in Writing and Grammar. Students are to refresh their memory of a transitive verb. A transitive verb is an action verb that directs action from the performer of the action toward the receiver of the action. In the lesson for today, students will learn to identify the “receiver of the action,” as well as other complements.

Activity 2:
Students will review complements and direct objects on pages 410 and 411 in Writing and Grammar. Using an integrative “Smart” board, students will complete the exercises on pg. 412-413 in Writing and Grammar.

Activity 3:
In their table groups students will complete pg. 55, 57, and 59 in Writing and Grammar Workbook. Students will have a quiz on direct objects on Tuesday.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log: Reading logs will be checked this Thursday, February 16 for days Monday, February 13 – Wednesday, February 15.
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Tonight’s Night Write for 15 minutes will be to prepare for their Oral Presentation.


Writing and Grammar pg. 410-413, and 316

Warm Up:
What is a direct object?

Activity 1:
Students will see the words complement and complete written on the board. Both words come from the same Latin word and their meanings are related. A complement makes something complete. Students will be directed to page 316 in Writing and Grammar. Students are to refresh their memory of a transitive verb. A transitive verb is an action verb that directs action from the performer of the action toward the receiver of the action. In the lesson for today, students will learn to identify the “receiver of the action,” as well as other complements.

Activity 2:
Students will review complements and direct objects on pages 410 and 411 in Writing and Grammar. Using an integrative “Smart” board, students will complete the exercises on pg. 412-413 in Writing and Grammar.

Activity 3:
In their table groups students will complete pg. 55, 57, and 59 in Writing and Grammar Workbook. Students will have a quiz on direct objects on Tuesday.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log: Reading logs will be checked this Thursday, February 16 for days Monday, February 13 – Wednesday, February 15.
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Tonight’s Night Write for 15 minutes will be to prepare for their Oral Presentation.

Writing and Grammar pg. 410-413, and 316

Warm Up:
What is a direct object?

Activity 1:
Students will see the words complement and complete written on the board. Both words come from the same Latin word and their meanings are related. A complement makes something complete. Students will be directed to page 316 in Writing and Grammar. Students are to refresh their memory of a transitive verb. A transitive verb is an action verb that directs action from the performer of the action toward the receiver of the action. In the lesson for today, students will learn to identify the “receiver of the action,” as well as other complements.

Activity 2:
Students will review complements and direct objects on pages 410 and 411 in Writing and Grammar. Using an integrative “Smart” board, students will complete the exercises on pg. 412-413 in Writing and Grammar.

Activity 3:
In their table groups students will complete pg. 55, 57, and 59 in Writing and Grammar Workbook. Students will have a quiz on direct objects on Tuesday.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log: Reading logs will be checked this Thursday, February 16 for days Monday, February 13 – Wednesday, February 15.
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Tonight’s Night Write for 15 minutes will be to prepare for their Oral Presentation.

posted on: February 12, 2006

Friday, February 10

Handouts:
Criteria for an Oral Presentation and Checklist for an Oral Presentation

Warm Up:
Appetizers pg. 41

Activity 1:
Answer any questions on the Criteria for an Oral Presentation and Checklist for an Oral Presentation pages 1-2.


Activity 2:
Discuss the Criteria for an Oral Presentation and Checklist for an Oral Presentation page 3.


Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Tonight’s Night Write for 15 minutes will be to complete Criteria for an Oral Presentation and Checklist for an Oral Presentation

posted on: February 05, 2006

Thursday, February 9

Handouts:
Criteria for an Oral Presentation

Students need to make sure they have signed up for a presentation date.

Warm Up: Why is it important for a speaker to show changes in the delivery (gestures, vocabulary, pace, and visuals)?

Activity 1:
Students will go over Criteria for an Oral Presentation
with their writing buddy.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Tonight’s Night Write for 15 minutes will be to complete Criteria for an Oral Presentation

posted on: February 05, 2006

Wednesday, February 8

Handouts:
Criteria for an Oral Presentation

Warm Up:
What does a speaker need to do to organize information to appeal to an audience?

Students need to make sure they have signed up for a presentation date.

Activity 1:
Students will sign up for presentation dates beginning 2/13.

Activity 2:
Begin to complete Handouts:
Criteria for an Oral Presentation pg. 1 and 2
to prepare for the oral presentation.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Tonight’s Night Write for 15 minutes will be to complete the criteria for an oral presentation. This will be collected for a grade at the time of the presentation.

posted on: February 05, 2006

Tuesday, February 7

Materials:
Write Source pg. 425-430

Handouts:
Criteria for an Oral Presentation

Warm Up:
What are the purposes of giving an oral presentation?

Activity 1:
Students will review Write Source pg. 425-430 for an overview for the preparation of an oral report and complete their storyboard, the visual chart, and the rewriting of the 1st paragraph of the research paper on the back of Handouts:
Criteria for an Oral Presentation.

Activity 2:
Students will read their chapter book for 30 min. and answer the following questions about the characters in their reading:
1. Who are the main characters/people in the story/text?
2. Do I like them? Why or why not?
3. Do any of the characters /people change in the story/text? How?
4. Does a character/person do things that are good or bad? What kind of things?

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Tonight’s Night Write for 15 minutes will be to complete their storyboard and the visuals chart.

posted on: February 05, 2006

Monday, February 6

Materials:
Great Source pg. 411-415, 423-424

Handouts:
Criteria for an Oral Presentation

Activity 1:
Students will submit their final copy of their research paper to e-rater.

Activity 2:
Students will begin to take the information from their research paper and turn it into an oral presentation. Making a storyboard for this endeavor will be started in class.

Activity 3:
Students will write a new beginning paragraph to better fit the requirements of an oral presentation on Criteria for an Oral Presentation
page 2.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Tonight’s Night: Students will submit their final copy of their research paper to e-rater, if they did not finish in class. Students will finish rewriting their 1st paragraph from their research paper to the 1st paragraph of their oral presentation.

posted on: February 05, 2006

Friday, February 3

Activity:
Students will work in the writing lab typing their papers into e-rater

Students will sign up for a presentation date beginning 2/13


Activity 2:
As a class we went on a student's blog and added constructive criticism to their writing piece. This can be done at home by following the following directions:
http://www.mabryonline.org/mglc/

On the right hand side of the page, click on Mabry's Global Learning Collaborative
Arrow down the page until you see Mrs. Abrams' Virtual Class and click
Arrow down and look on the right hand side for the list of categories
Click on Work in Progress
Chose an entry from a student
At the end of the entry, click on comments
Type your comments in the box
Please put initials, etc.in the box for your name

Arrow down and click on preview; you can go back to edit what you wrote
in your comments, when you finish previewing your comment


Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

For samples of student work:
Activity 2:
As a class we went on a student's blog and added constructive criticism to their writing piece. This ca be done at home by following the following directions:
http://www.mabryonline.org/mglc/

On the right hand side of the page, click on Mabry's Global Learning Collaborative
Arrow down the page until you see Mrs. Abrams' Virtual Class and click
Arrow down and look on the right hand side for the list of categories
Click on Work in Progress
Chose an entry from a student
At the end of the entry, click on comments
Type your comments in the box
Please put initials, etc.in the box for your name

Arrow down and click on preview; you can go back to edit what you wrote
in your comments, when you finish previewing your comment

Tonight’s Night Write for 15 minutes will be to complete the entire revising checklist. This will be collected for a grade.

posted on: January 29, 2006

Thursday, February 2

Materials:
Great Source pg. 408

Warm Up:
Correct a paragraph from a student’s writing.

As a class we went on a student's blog and added constructive criticism to their writing piece. This ca be done at home by following the following directions:
http://www.mabryonline.org/mglc/

On the right hand side of the page, click on Mabry's Global Learning Collaborative
Arrow down the page until you see Mrs. Abrams' Virtual Class and click
Arrow down and look on the right hand side for the list of categories
Click on Work in Progress
Chose an entry from a student
At the end of the entry, click on comments
Type your comments in the box
Please put initials, etc.in the box for your name

Arrow down and click on preview; you can go back to edit what you wrote
in your comments, when you finish previewing your comment


Activity 1:
Students will focus on peer editing the rough draft of their writing buddy’s research paper paying close attention to organization, voice, word choice, sentence fluency, paying close attention to ideas, Peer editors will completing the Revising Checklist for their writing buddy.

Activity 2:
Reading logs were collected to record the number of books read so far this year.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary


Tonight’s Night Write for 15 minutes will be to complete the entire revising checklist. This will be collected for a grade.

posted on: January 29, 2006

Wednesday, February 1

Materials:
Great Source pg. 408

Handout:
Revising Checklist

Warm Up:
Correct a paragraph from a student’s writing.

As a class we went on a student's blog and added constructive criticism to their writing piece. This can be done at home by following the following directions:
http://www.mabryonline.org/mglc/

On the right hand side of the page, click on Mabry's Global Learning Collaborative
Arrow down the page until you see Mrs. Abrams' Virtual Class and click
Arrow down and look on the right hand side for the list of categories
Click on Work in Progress
Chose an entry from a student
At the end of the entry, click on comments
Type your comments in the box
Please put initials, etc.in the box for your name

Arrow down and click on preview; you can go back to edit what you wrote
in your comments, when you finish previewing your comment


Activity 1:
Students will focus on editing the rough draft of the research paper paying close attention to organization, voice, word choice, sentence fluency, paying close attention to ideas, Students will begin completing the Handout:
Revising Checklist.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Tonight’s Night Write for 15 minutes will be to complete the entire Handout:
Revising Checklist

This will be collected for a grade.

posted on: January 29, 2006

Tuesday, January 31

Materials:
Great Source pg. 407-408

Handout:
Revising Checklist

Activity 1:
Students will focus on revising the rough draft of the research paper paying close attention to organization, voice, word choice, sentence fluency, paying close attention to ideas, Students will begin completing the revising checklist.

Activity 2:
As a class we went on a student's blog and added constructive criticism to their writing piece. This ca be done at home by following the following directions:
http://www.mabryonline.org/mglc/

On the right hand side of the page, click on Mabry's Global Learning Collaborative
Arrow down the page until you see Mrs. Abrams' Virtual Class and click
Arrow down and look on the right hand side for the list of categories
Click on Work in Progress
Chose an entry from a student
At the end of the entry, click on comments
Type your comments in the box
Please put initials, etc.in the box for your name

Arrow down and click on preview; you can go back to edit what you wrote
in your comments, when you finish previewing your comment


Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Tonight’s Night Write for 15 minutes will be to complete the revising checklist. This will be collected for a grade.

posted on: January 29, 2006

Monday, January 30

Materials:
Great Source pg. 405-406

Warm Up:
Appetizers – pg. 38

Activity 1:
Students will focus on revising the research paper from the introductory paragraph, through the 4 middle paragraphs, and the concluding paragraph.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Tonight’s Night Write for 15 minutes will be to revise entire 1st rough draft of the research paper.

posted on: January 29, 2006

What a day we had today! Friday, January 27

Materials:
Great Source pg. 403-404

Warm Up:
What is a work-cited page?

Activity 1:
Students will alphabetize their source cards. Review Great Source pg. 403-404 for the guidelines for creating a work-cited page. The media center blog will have Mrs. Hendrix’s guidelines for each type of source. Please keep in mind that every mark of punctuation, capitalization, underlining, indenting, etc. is important for an accurate work-cited page.

Activity 2:
Students will focus on revising just the rough draft of their paper by reading it aloud to their writing buddy..

What a fabulous opportunity has graced our students! Thanks to Dr. Tyson, I have 16 students who post their work to the blog each day. This student work is available for grandma's. grandpas, aunts, uncles, parents, etc. Students may comment to each other. All comments are screened by me before they are posted to the world. Please have your student and you take advantage of this opportunity. Seeing and commenting on other students' work, allows your student and you to compare their work. How powerful this learning experience will be for all! Here are the directions:

Go to http://www.mabryonline.org/mglc/
On the right hand side of the page, click on Mabry’s Global Learning Collaborative
Arrow down the page until you see Mrs. Abrams’ Virtual Class and click
Arrow down and look on the right hand side for the list of categories
Click on Work in Progress
Chose an entry from a student
At the end of the entry, click on comments
Type your comments in the box
Please put initials, etc.in the box for your name
Arrow down and click on preview; you can go back to edit what you wrote in your comments, when you finish previewing your comment
Then click Post
 
Thank you for your support in this endeavor. What a fabulous learning opportunity this is for my students!

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Tonight’s Night Write for 15 minutes will be to revise the research paper, being sure to insert transitions where appropriate.

posted on: January 27, 2006

Friday, January 27

Materials:
Great Source pg. 403-404

Warm Up:
What is a work-cited page?

Activity 1:
Students will alphabetize their source cards. Review Great Source pg. 403-404 for the guidelines for creating a work-cited page. The media center blog will have Mrs. Hendrix’s guidelines for each type of source. Please keep in mind that every mark of punctuation, capitalization, underlining, indenting, etc. is important for an accurate work-cited page.

Activity 2:
Students will focus on revising just the rough draft of their paper by reading it aloud to their writing buddy..

What a fabulous opportunity has graced our students! Thanks to Dr. Tyson, I have 16 students who post their work to the blog each day. This student work is available for grandma's. grandpas, aunts, uncles, parents, etc. Students may comment to each other. All comments are screened by me before they are posted to the world. Please have your student and you take advantage of this opportunity. Seeing and commenting on other students' work, allows your student and you to compare their work. How powerful this learning experience will be for all! Here are the directions:

Go to http://www.mabryonline.org/mglc/
On the right hand side of the page, click on Mabry’s Global Learning Collaborative
Arrow down the page until you see Mrs. Abrams’ Virtual Class and click
Arrow down and look on the right hand side for the list of categories
Click on Work in Progress
Chose an entry from a student
At the end of the entry, click on comments
Type your comments in the box
Please put initials, etc.in the box for your name
Arrow down and click on preview; you can go back to edit what you wrote in your comments, when you finish previewing your comment
Then click Post
 
Thank you for your support in this endeavor. What a fabulous learning opportunity this is for my students!

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Tonight’s Night Write for 15 minutes will be to revise the research paper, being sure to insert transitions where appropriate.

posted on: January 22, 2006

Thursday, January 26

Materials:
Great Source page 402
Introductory Paragraph Overhead (page 12 in the research unit file)
Write Source pages 394 and 398
Refer to page 4 of this file for the overhead on reading rates
Refer to page 11 of this unit for the overhead on paraphrasing vs, plagiarism
Refer to page 12 of this unit for the overhead on introductory paragraph
Refer to page 13 of this unit for the overhead on concluding paragraph

Warm Up:
What is a thesis statement?

Activity 1:
Students will write the rough draft of their closing paragraph, keeping the following in mind:
1. Remind the reader about the overall point or thesis of the report
2. Tell one last interesting fact about the topic
3. Answer the “So what?” question
4. A good ending relates back to the
5. A good ending relates back to the beginning in some way
Although the ending may repeat the idea stated in the thesis statement, is should restate the main idea in a different way

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Tonight’s Night Write for 15 minutes will be to complete the four body paragraphs of your rough draft, the introductory paragraph and the concluding (or closing) paragraph. The entire first rough draft is due on Friday, January 27.

posted on: January 22, 2006

Wednesday, January 25

Materials:
Great Source page 399-401
Introductory Paragraph Overhead (page 12 in the research unit file)
Write Source pages 394 and 398
Refer to page 4 of this file for the overhead on reading rates
Refer to page 12 of this unit for the overhead on introductory paragraph

Warm Up:
Appetizers pg. 36

Activity 1:
Great Source page 399-401. Students will write the first rough draft of their 4 middle paragraphs. Be sure to write 1 paragraph for each key word you researched. Keep the following information in mind when writing your headings:

1. Reveal the organization of a piece of research writing
2. Make it easier for readers to preview an article
3. help readers find information they may be looking for


Use your outline to make sure each of the middle paragraphs has the following:
1. Topic sentence that covers one main idea
2. At least three supporting sentences that support the main idea
3. Concluding/clincher/closing sentence that summarizes the information in the paragraph and/or answers the question “So what?”

Students will read these aloud to their table group and make any necessary changes.

Activity 2:
Students are to go through their first rough draft making any additions or changes that are necessary. Students are encouraged to use the thesaurus for this endeavor.

When writing the paragraph \the students must be sure to:
 Begin with a main idea sentence that states the key word.
 Write supporting detail sentences using the information on the note cards
 Write a concluding sentence that draws a conclusion about the information presented
 Check the paragraph for spelling errors
 Check the paragraph for grammar errors
 Check the paragraph for fragments and/or run-on sentences


Bibliography and note cards from four sources used for the research paper will be collected for a grade on Wednesday, January 25.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Tonight’s Night Write
Students will complete the rough draft for four body paragraphs of their rough draft. Students will use the 2nd – 4th section of the outline (in pencil on every other line) for the first rough draft of the rest of the body for the research paper. When writing the paragraph the students must be sure to:
 Begin with a main idea sentence that states the key word.
 Write supporting detail sentences using the information on the note cards
 Write a concluding sentence that draws a conclusion about the information presented
 Check the paragraph for spelling errors
 Check the paragraph for grammar errors
 Check the paragraph for fragments and/or run-on sentences

posted on: January 22, 2006

Tuesday, January 24

Materials:
Introductory Paragraph Overhead (page 12 in the research unit file)
Write Source pages 394 and 398
Refer to page 4 of this file for the overhead on reading rates
Refer to page 12 of this unit for the overhead on introductory paragraph
Refer to page 11 of this unit for the overhead on paraphrasing vs. plagiarism

Warm Up:
Why research?
Some of the responses may be:
o To see how academics relate to life
o To find answers; finding answers is not difficult once one has mastered some basic research techniques
o To learn more information about a topic
o To make an educated decision about a major purpose
o To write a paper or essay for class
o To prepare a talk or presentation
o To take part in a debate
o To take part in a class discussion
o To satisfy your curiosity

Activity 1:
Read your chapter book for 30 minutes and answer the following on notebook paper and answer the following questions about the main idea of the information you just read.
What are the main events that have happened in the text?
Can I guess what is going to happen next?
What clues from the text can I use?
What would I have done differently if I had been one of the characters?


Activity 2:
Using the formula and examples in Write Source pages 394, students will generate their thesis statement and share with the students at their table.


Activity 3:
Using Introductory Paragraph Overhead (page 12 in the research unit file) and you might consider using one of the suggested openings in Write Source pages 398.
Students will write the first rough draft of the introductory paragraph. Have students practice each of the suggested openers. Make a 3-column chart. At the top of the columns write


Interesting Fact Interesting Question Interesting Quotation


Students will read these aloud to their table group and make any necessary changes.


Bibliography and note cards from four sources used for the research paper will be collected for a grade on Wednesday, January 25.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Tonight’s Night Write for 15 minutes will be to complete the introductory paragraph as discussed and modeled in class.
Bibliography and note cards from four sources used for the research paper will be collected for a grade on Wednesday, January 25.
Anticipation Guide is due on Wed., January 25.
Framework (Working Outline is due on Wed., January 25.

posted on: January 22, 2006

Monday, January 23

Monday January 23
Materials:
Student note cards
Write Source page 395

Warm Up:
What is the difference between paraphrasing and plagiarism?

Activity 1:
Each student is to make 4 stacks from their note cards (with each key word as the category) and then place the note cards in a logical order. (still separated by category)
Using the information on the note cards, have each student write an outline using the information Write Source page 395.


Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record the following on their reading on your reading log:
Genre (fiction or nonfiction)
Date
Title
Reading level
Actual pages read (example 21-47)
Minutes read
One-sentence summary

Tonight’s Night Write for 15 minutes will be to complete the outline for your research paper.


Bibliography and note cards from four sources used for the research paper will be collected for a grade on Wednesday, January 25.
Anticipation Guide is due on Wed., January 25.
Framework (Working Outline is due on Wed., January 25.

posted on: January 22, 2006

Friday, January 20, 2006

Students will be going to the media center. Mrs. Hendrix will guide the students in the completion of their resource handout, the framework outline handout, gathering information, writing notes on note cards.

Homework:
Reading
Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log.
Night Write
Students will need to complete the information on the resources they will be using for documentation in their research paper and the framework outline. 50 completed note cards (with at least 10 note cards under each key word) and 4 bibliography cards are due at the end of class on today, January 20.

posted on: January 15, 2006

Thursday, January 19

Students will be going to the media center. Mrs. Hendrix will guide the students in the completion of their resource handout, the framework outline handout, gathering information, writing notes on note cards.

Homework:
Reading
Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log.
Night Write
Students will need to complete the information on the resources they will be using for documentation in their research paper and the framework outline. 50 completed note cards (with at least 10 note cards under each key word) and 4 bibliography cards are due at the end of class on Friday, January 20.

posted on: January 15, 2006

Wednesday, January18

Wednesday, January 18
Students will be going to the media center. Mrs. Hendrix will guide the students in the completion of their resource handout, the framework outline handout, gathering information, writing notes on note cards.

Homework:
Reading
Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log.
Night Write
Students will need to complete the information on the resources they will be using for documentation in their research paper and the framework outline. 50 completed note cards (with at least 10 note cards under each key word) and 4 bibliography cards are due at the end of class on Friday, January 20.

posted on: January 15, 2006

Tuesday, January 17

Warm Up:
Appetizers – pg.35

Activity 1:
Read your chapter book for 30 minutes and answer the following on notebook paper:
How do you feel about the way the story is told?
Is there anything about the way the author wrote that gave you enjoyment or cause you irritation?
What do you feel is the most significant passage from you reading? Page? Paragraph? Sentence?
Why is this passage important to you?
What makes this passage significant to the story?
This assignment will be collected for a grade.

Homework:
Reading
Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log.
Night Write
Students will need to complete the information on the resources they will be using for documentation in their research paper and the framework outline. 50 completed note cards (with at least 10 note cards under each key word) and 4 bibliography cards are due at the end of class on Friday, January 20.

posted on: January 15, 2006

Wednesday, January 11

Warm Up:
What is the topic you chose for your research paper? Why?

Overheads:
Research Made Simple


Handouts:
Research Topics

Anticipation Guide
Writing Fair Application
Research Made Simple


Materials:
Write Source pg. 381-386


Activity 1:
Share topic selections.

Discuss the definition of research and why we research? Working with a partner, students will complete the Anticipation Guide for Research.

Collect Selection of Topic handout for a grade.


Activity 2:

Walk through Write Source pg. 381-386 and discuss the model of the research paper.
Students will use the information from Research Made Simple

to begin the Framework (Working Outline). Research Made Simple

will be collected for a grade.

Students will need 60 3" x 5" index cards by Friday, January 13.

Homework:
Reading
Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log.
Night Write
Complete Framework (Working Outline)

posted on: January 09, 2006

Research Tutorials

http://www.nacs.k12.in.us/resources/research/CHSResearchPaperHelp.html


Evaluating a Website
http://school.discovery.com/schrockguide/evalmidd.html


Tips on Searching
http://www.lkwdpl.org/study/research/research.htm


How do I take notes from sources?
http://www.scs.k12.tn.us/SCS/subject-areas/Research_paper/notes.htm#looks


How do I take research notes?
http://www.ehow.com/how_2853_research-notes.html

posted on: January 08, 2006

Friday, January 13, 2006

Framework For Research
http://www.nacs.k12.in.us/resources/research/CHSResearchPaperHelp.html


Evaluating a Website
http://school.discovery.com/schrockguide/evalmidd.html


Tips on Searching
http://www.lkwdpl.org/study/research/research.htm


How do I take notes from sources?
http://www.scs.k12.tn.us/SCS/subject-areas/Research_paper/notes.htm#looks


How do I take research notes?
http://www.ehow.com/how_2853_research-notes.html
Students will be going to the media center. Mrs. Hendrix will guide the students in the completion of their resource handout and the framework outline handout.

Homework:
Reading
Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log.
Night Write
Students will need to complete the information on the resources they will be using for documentation in their research paper.

posted on: January 08, 2006

Tuesday, January 10

Warm Up:
What is research?

Overheads:
Anticipation Guide
Research Plan Made Simple

Handouts: Research Topics

Research Made Simple
Writing Fair Application

Materials:
Write Source pg. 381-386

Activity 2:
Distribute the Topics handout and discuss the possibilities. Turn the handout over and complete the graph narrowing down the topic.

Activity 3:
Read your chapter book for 30 minutes and answer the following:
How do you feel about the way the story is told?
Is there anything about the way the author wrote that gave you enjoyment or cause you irritation?
What do you feel is the most significant passage from you reading? Page? Paragraph? Sentence?
Why is this passage important to you?
What makes this passage significant to the story?

Homework:
Reading
Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log.
Night Write
Complete Narrow Down the Topic on the back of the possible topics list. Prioritize your choices of topics.

posted on: December 21, 2005

Thursday, January 12

Overheads:
Research Plan Made Simple

Reading Rates

Research Framework (Working Outline)
http://www.nacs.k12.in.us/resources/research/CHSResearchPaperHelp.html


Evaluating a Website
http://school.discovery.com/schrockguide/evalmidd.html


Tips on Searching
http://www.lkwdpl.org/study/research/research.htm


How do I take notes from sources?
http://www.scs.k12.tn.us/SCS/subject-areas/Research_paper/notes.htm#looks


How do I take research notes?
http://www.ehow.com/how_2853_research-notes.htmlHandouts:
Research Plan Made Simple

Reading Rates

Research Framework (Working Outline)
Materials:
Write Source pg.

Warm Up:
Quick Write – pg. 32 “First Television”

Activity 1:
Share responses on Framework (Working Outline) with students at the table.

Activity 2:
Go over the Resources handout that will be used in the media center on 1/13/06.

Graded Papers Returned:
Selection of Research Topic

Homework:
Students will need 60 3" x 5" index cards on Friday, January 13.

Reading
Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log.
Night Write
Complete Framework (Working Outline), if it is not already finished. Students will need to be ready to start documenting the resources they will be using on Friday 1/13, when they go to the media center.


posted on: December 21, 2005

Thursday, December 22

Students will go to the media center and fine tune research skills.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record this reading on your reading log.

posted on: December 15, 2005

Wednesday, December 21

Materials:
Everyday Spelling – pg. 98-99
Everyday Spelling Lesson 20 Words, Vocab-o-gram, and Overheads
Lesson 20 words in envelopes
Overhead:
Lesson 20 vocabulary words
Warm Up:
Appetizers – pg. 31

Activity 1:
Students will complete "Drawing Conclusions" on page 99 in Spelling Essentials and reviewed the spelling and meaning of the words and Latin roots.

Activity 2:
Students will take a spelling test on lesson 20 words today

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record this reading on your reading log.

posted on: December 15, 2005

Tuesday, December 20

Warm Up:
Which of the Everyday Spelling Lesson 20 Words, Vocab-o-gram, and Overheads
are a challenge for you?
Students will take a spelling test on lesson 20 words on Thursday, December 22

Activity 1:
Read your chapter book for 30 minutes, complete an entry on your reading log, and answer the following:

What impressions are you forming in your mind of people and places in the story?

What pictures do you have in your mind’s eye?

Are you able to see in your mind the characters and the places where the events take place?

What in the text helps you see a picture?

What sort of vantage point or perspective do you seem to have?

Homework:
Reading:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Students may read the book they selected for the book chat. Complete an entry on your reading log.

Night Write:
Students are to write the answers to the following questions about tonight’s reading:
What impressions are you forming in your mind of people and places in the story?

What pictures do you have in your mind’s eye?

Are you able to see in your mind the characters and the places where the events take place?

What in the text helps you see a picture?

What sort of vantage point or perspective do you seem to have?

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record this reading on your reading log.

Night Write:
Record 1 incident in tonight’s reading of a problem that occurred and the solution for that problem.

posted on: December 15, 2005

Monday, December 19

Materials:
Everyday Spelling – pg. 96- 97
Everyday Spelling Lesson 20 Words, Vocab-o-gram, and Overheads
Lesson 20 words in envelopes
Word Trees for each table

Overhead:
Lesson 20 vocabulary words

Students will take a spelling test on lesson 20 words on Thursday, December 22

Warm Up:
Appetizers – pg. 32

Activity 1:
Working in table groups students will categorize the words in the envelope.

Activity 2:
Each table group will generate 1 Everyday Spelling Lesson 20 Words, Vocab-o-gram, and Overheads.

Activity 3:
Working in a table group students are to complete # 1-20 on page 97 in Everyday Spelling.

posted on: December 14, 2005

Friday, December 16

Materials:
Everyday Spelling – pg. 96- 99
Everyday Spelling Lesson 20 Words, Vocab-o-gram, and Overheads
Lesson 20 words in envelopes

Overhead:
Everyday Spelling Lesson 20 Words, Vocab-o-gram, and Overheads


Warm Up:
Appetizers – pg. 31

Activity 1:
Working with a partner, students complete page 1 of Everyday Spelling Lesson 20 Words, Vocab-o-gram, and Overheads
to introduce students to the Latin roots: ject, rupt, duct, and pend. Discuss a few of the responses with the entire class.

Activity 2:
Students will be asked the following:
How many of you see words on the overhead you know?
How many of you see words on the overhead you know, but can not explain them to a younger brother or sister?
How many of you see words on the overhead you don’t have a clue?
Does anyone see a word they can pronounce? Students will pronounce the words.
Does anyone see a word they can describe and give an example in a sentence of that word to the class? Go through the words until all have been discussed.
Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record this reading on your reading log.

Night Write:
Describe the most successful strategy you use to learn new vocabulary words.

posted on: December 14, 2005

Thursday, December 15

Materials:
Reader’s Handbook pg. 294-305

Overheads:
Reader’s Handbook – pg. 8 and 119

Warm Up:
Describe your own reading process. Use overhead pg. 8.

Activity 1:
Discuss responses to the warm up questions, making sure “before, during and after” steps are discussed. Refer to Reader’s Handbook pg. 294-305. Take a few minutes to get an idea what the story is about. What process will you complete in order to get this idea?

Activity 2:
Have you ever wondered what you were supposed to get out of a story/piece of reading? Ask yourself what you might find in the story/piece of reading. You could turn the title into a question. Have students turn the title “Charlie” into a question. Have students determine what they might find in the story. The purpose for reading the story “Charlie” might be “Who is Charles, and what is he like?

Activity 3:
Refer to the preview checklist in Reader’s Handbook pg. 295. Using the text and the overheads, preview the story by pointing out the boxes in the margin and the highlighted text. This will guide students through the previewing checklist (Reader’s Handbook pg. 295).

Activity 4:
What information did you learn in the preview? Use overhead pg. 119.The process of previewing this story should take no longer than 2 minutes. The information you gained from the previewing will help you make a plan to get the information you want about Charles. Finding out about him is your purpose for reading the story. Think of a way to get the information and to remember this information. Refer to the questions at the bottom of page 304 in Reader’s Handbook.

Activity 5:
Focus on 1 part of the story. During your reading of this story, put a sticky flag by everything that has to do with Charles. Mark what when he first appears in the story, what he says, what is said about him, and what details are given about him.

Activity 6:
How did the main character in your book chat book change from the beginning of the book until the end? When reading “Charles” you will need to look for the changes in this character. By looking at the changes in the character, you will get an idea of what the author is trying to say.

Activity 7:
Make a list of graphic organizers students have used in any of their classes. Refer to the story organizer chart in Reader’s Handbook pg. 305. Students are to set up this chart.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes and record this reading on your reading log.

Night Write:
Describe 3 key events that show the change in Charles from the beginning of the story until the end of the story.


posted on: December 13, 2005

Wednesday, December 14

Materials:
Student portfolio

Handouts:
Reflection on Portfolio

Warm Up:
List 3 things you do or think about when you reflect on a past experience?

Activity 1:
Give One/Get One – Students have 2 minutes to go around the room and share one answer with a classmate and give one answer to a classmate until each student has 6 responses to the warm up question. Then ask for 6 fabulous answers and write them on the overhead.

Activity 2:
Go over the Reflection on Portfolio
and model each item.

Activity 3:
Students are to complete the Reflection on Portfolio

Papers Collected To Be Graded:
Reflection on Portfolio


Graded Papers To Be Returned and Filed in Portfolio:
Response to Literature Rough Draft
Response to Literature Final Copy
Response to Literature Reflection Log

Homework:
Bring sticky flags to school on Thursday

Reading:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Students may read the book they selected for the book chat. Complete an entry on your reading log.

Night Write:
Students are to complete the rest of the Portfolio Reflection, if this was not completed in class.

posted on: December 08, 2005

Tuesday, December 13

Warm Up:
Appetizers – pg. 29

Activity 1:
Read your chapter book for 30 minutes, complete an entry on your reading log, and answer the following:

What impressions are you forming in your mind of people and places in the story?

What pictures do you have in your mind’s eye?

Are you able to see in your mind the characters and the places where the events take place?

What in the text helps you see a picture?

What sort of vantage point or perspective do you seem to have?

Homework:
Reading:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Students may read the book they selected for the book chat. Complete an entry on your reading log.

Night Write:
Students are to write the answers to the following questions about tonight’s reading:
What impressions are you forming in your mind of people and places in the story?

What pictures do you have in your mind’s eye?

Are you able to see in your mind the characters and the places where the events take place?

What in the text helps you see a picture?

What sort of vantage point or perspective do you seem to have?

posted on: December 08, 2005

Monday, December 12


Handouts:
Response To Literature Reflective Log


Warm Up:
Students will identify the parts of speech for each word in the following sentence:

A reflective log is a student assessment of their work.

Activity 1:
Students will complete Response To Literature Reflective Log
on the personal writing unit of study. This will be collected for a test grade.
As a class, go over each item on the test with examples:
1. This piece shows that I’m able to use_________, _________, ________ in my response to literature because…
Ask the class to give criteria or guidelines that are specifically for writing a response to literature. Some of the answers should be :
Focus statement
Theme
3 events that show the character learning from the theme
Beginning, middle, and ending paragraphs

2. This piece shows I really understand the content because…
Ask the class to give some specific examples of responses. . Some of the answers should be:
I used…
Focus statement which was:
Theme which was:
3 events that show the character learning from the theme which were:

Beginning, middle, and ending paragraphs

3. If I could show this piece to anyone, I would show it to _______________ because…
Students need to explain specifically what they have included in this paper that they have not in any other piece of writing.
4. People who knew me last year would never believe this piece because…
What evidence does the student explain in their writing that shows improvement in their writing from last year?
5. The most challenging part of this writing piece was ____________ because…
Students need to identify the most challenging part of writing this paper. Explain why this part was such a challenge.

6. My (parents, friend, teacher)(Circle one.) liked this piece because…

When students conferred (talked with) a peer, a friend, a teacher, a parent; what was a positive comment made on this piece of writing?

7. One thing I have learned about myself is…
Students are to identify and explain the work ethic involved in the completion of this assignment. What was involved in completing each of the steps in the writing process?

8. I still have questions about…
What are some of the areas of the writing process or the specific criteria for writing a personal narrative that needs more work? “None” is not an answer.

Comments:
Students are to write any comments they want me to know in order to improve the teaching of this unit or comments in the areas of this unit that were the most helpful.

Collected Papers To Be Graded:
Response To Literature Reflective Log

Homework:
Reading:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Students may read the book they selected for the book chat. Complete an entry on your reading log.
Night Write:
Take a writing vacation

posted on: December 08, 2005

Friday, December 9


Warm Up:
Students will identify the parts of speech for each word in the following sentence:

The green portfolio contains examples of the writing process for specific writing assignments.

Activity 1:
Students will fine tune their Response to Literature projects. Students who wrote a 5 paragraph essay must submit this to e-rater today in class. Students who completed a PowerPoint or webpage must turn in a printout of the presentation.

Activity 2:
Students will share their projects with students at their table.

Collected Papers To Be Graded:
Rough drafts
PowerPoint printout
Webpage printout
Script for iMovie

Homework:
Reading:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Complete an entry on your reading log.

Night Write:
Students are to work on the completion of their final copy of the response to literature assignment, if they did not turn this in to me in class. Other students may take a writing vacation.

posted on: December 08, 2005

Thursday, December 8

Thursday, December 8

Media Center
Focus: Finding specific information on the Internet

Homework:
Reading:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Students may read the book they selected for the book chat. Complete an entry on your reading log.
Night Write:
Students are to work on the completion of their final copy of the response to literature assignment. The final copy (submitted to e-rater) is due by Friday, December 9.

posted on: December 02, 2005

Friday, December 9


Reading:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Students may read the book they selected for the book chat. Complete an entry on your reading log.
Night Write:
Take a writing vacation.

posted on: December 02, 2005

Wednesday, December 7

Students will spend the class period in the writing lab perfecting their final copy of the response to literature assignment.

Homework:
Reading:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Students may read the book they selected for the book chat. Complete an entry on your reading log.
Night Write:
Students are to work on the completion of their final copy of the response to literature assignment. The final copy (submitted to e-rater) is due by Friday, December 9.

posted on: November 27, 2005

Tuesday, December 6

Warm Up:
Appetizers – pg. 28

Activity 1:
Read your chapter book for 30 minutes, complete an entry on your reading log, and answer the following:

What impressions are you forming in your mind of people and places in the story?

What pictures do you have in your mind’s eye?

Are you able to see in your mind the characters and the places where the events take place?

What in the text helps you see a picture?

What sort of vantage point or perspective do you seem to have?

Homework:
Reading:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Students may read the book they selected for the book chat. Complete an entry on your reading log.
Night Write:
Students are to work on the completion of their final copy of the response to literature assignment. This assignment is due 12/9 at the beginning of class.

posted on: November 27, 2005

Monday, December 5

The Plot Diagram Template could be used to generate any of the following:
PowerPoint
Web Page
iMovie

The required criteria for this assignment is the same as the material on the PowerPoint template.
Reminder to students: The focus statement should be included on the theme slide.

Students will spend the class period in the writing lab perfecting their final copy of the response to literature assignment.
Due to technical difficulties, the following information is important. Those students writing a 5-paragraph essay are to type and save on http://www.phsuccessnet.com

Those students making a PowerPoint should complete the template and email it to me at ilene.abrams@cobbk12.org

Homework:
Reading:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Students may read the book they selected for the book chat. Complete an entry on your reading log.
Night Write:
Students are to work on the completion of their final copy of the response to literature assignment.

posted on: November 27, 2005

Friday, December 2

The Plot Diagram Template could be used to generate any of the following:
PowerPoint
Web Page
iMovie

The required criteria for this assignment is the same as the material on the PowerPoint template.
Reminder to students: The focus statement should be included on the theme slide.

Students will spend the class period in the writing lab perfecting their final copy of the response to literature assignment.
Due to technical difficulties, the following information is important. Those students writing a 5-paragraph essay are to type and save on http://www.phsuccessnet.com

Those students making a PowerPoint should complete the template and email it to me at ilene.abrams@cobbk12.org

Homework:
Reading:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Students may read the book they selected for the book chat. Complete an entry on your reading log.
Night Write:
Students are to work on the completion of their final copy of the response to literature assignment.

FYI: Focus Statment

posted on: November 27, 2005

Thursday, December 1

Materials:
Write Source – pg. 313-317
The Plot Diagram Template could be used to generate any of the following:
PowerPoint
Web Page
iMovie

The required criteria for this assignment is the same as the material on the PowerPoint template.
Reminder to students: The focus statement should be included on the theme slide.

Handout:
Peer Response

Warm Up:
Appetizers – pg. 27

Activity 1:
Review and discuss the information in Write Source on pg. 317 dealing with the concept of publishing.

Activity 2:
Students are to show substantial evidence of revising and editing on their rough draft or storyboard.

Activity 3:
Working with their writing partner, students will swap papers and give constructive criticism to their writing partner (using the Peer Response).

Homework:
Reading:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Students may read the book they selected for the book chat. Complete an entry on your reading log.
Night Write:
Your1st rough draft or the storyboard for the alternate assignment for Response to Literature essay needs to show substantial evidence of revising and editing.

posted on: November 27, 2005

Wednesday, November 30

Materials:
Write Source – pg. 313-316

The Plot Diagram Template could be used to generate any of the following:
PowerPoint
Web Page
iMovie

The required criteria for this assignment is the same as the material on the PowerPoint template.
Reminder to students: The focus statement should be included on the theme slide or the plot teaser slide.

Warm Up:
Appetizers – pg. 26

Activity 1:
Review and discuss the information in Write Source on pg. 313-316 dealing with the concept of editing.

Activity 2:
Students are to show substantial evidence of editing on their rough draft or storyboard.

Activity 3:
Working with their writing partner, students will read aloud their rough draft or storyboard,

Homework:
Reading:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Students may read the book they selected for the book chat. Complete an entry on your reading log.
Night Write:
Your1st rough draft or the storyboard for the alternate assignment for Response to Literature essay needs to show substantial evidence of revising and editing.

posted on: November 27, 2005

Tuesday, November 29

Materials:
Write Source – pg. 295-312

The Plot Diagram Template could be used to generate any of the following:
PowerPoint
Web Page
iMovie

The required criteria for this assignment is the same as the material on the PowerPoint template.
Reminder to students: The focus statement should be included on the theme slide or the plot teaser slide.


Warm Up:
Appetizers – pg. 25

Activity 1:
Read your chapter book for 30 minutes, complete an entry on your reading log, and answer the following:
Why did the author write this book?
To persuade
To entertain
To inform

What is the message the author is communicating to the reader?

Title and Author of the book

Students will be expected to be reading the same book that appears as the last entry on their reading log (unless they show evidence of just finishing the book).

Papers Collected for a Grade:
Focus Statement
Outline

Homework:
Reading:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Students may read the book they selected for the book chat. Complete an entry on your reading log.
Night Write:
Your1st rough draft or the storyboard for the alternate assignment for Response to Literature essay needs to show substantial evidence of revising.

posted on: November 27, 2005

Monday, November 28

Materials:
Write Source – pg. 295-312
The Plot Diagram Template could be used to generate any of the following:
PowerPoint
Web Page
iMovie

The required criteria for this assignment is the same as the material on the PowerPoint template.
Reminder to students: The focus statement should be included on the theme slide or the plot teaser slide.


Warm Up:
Appetizers – pg. 24

Activity 1:
Review Write Source – pg. 295 through pg. 300. Read the rough draft or storyboard aloud to your writing partner (for the Response to Literature, and be sure to sum up the theme by showing what the main character learned).

Remember:
 State the theme (what the character learns) in a focus statement (the last sentence in your first paragraph).
 Explain how the theme relates to life in the ending paragraph.


Activity 2:
You should have a complete (5 paragraphs) copy of your rough draft of your essay (double spaced and in pencil). Be sure to complete the first rough draft or storyboard before you begin revising.

Activity 3:
Using Write Source – pg. 300 – 312 students are to revise their essay.
Make sure you:
 do not have any two sentences beginning with the same word
 use action verbs
 descriptive adjectives
 at least one sentence in the essay begins with a preposition
 use a thesaurus

Homework:

Progress reports were distributed in class and must be signed and given back to me in class on Tuesday.

Reading:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Students may read the book they selected for the book chat. Complete an entry on your reading log.
Night Write:
Your1st rough draft or the storyboard for the alternate assignment for Response to Literature essay needs to show substantial evidence of revising.

posted on: November 27, 2005

Friday, November 18

Friday, November 18
Materials:
Write Source – pg. 300 - 312

Warm Up:
Appetizers – pg. 23

Activity 1:
Read aloud Write Source – pg. 300. Write the rough draft for the Response to Literature, and be sure to sum up the theme by showing what the main character learned.
Remember:
 State the theme (what the character learns) in a focus statement (the last sentence in your first paragraph).
 Explain how the theme relates to life in the ending paragraph.


Activity 2:
You should have a complete (5 paragraphs) copy of your rough draft of your essay (double spaced and in pencil). Be sure to complete the first rough draft before you begin revising.

Activity 3:
Using Write Source – pg. 300 – 312 students are to revise their essay.
Make sure you:
 do not have any two sentences beginning with the same word
 use action verbs
 descriptive adjectives
 at least one sentence in the essay begins with a preposition
 use a thesaurus

Reading:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Students may read the book they selected for the book chat. Complete an entry on your reading log.
Night Write:
Your1st rough draft for Response to Literature essay needs to be completed by Monday, November 28 or the storyboard for the alternate assignment.


Student Options:
The Plot Diagram Template could be used to generate any of the following:
PowerPoint
Web Page
iMovie

The required criteria for this assignment is the same as the material on the PowerPoint template.
Reminder to students: The focus statement should be included on the theme slide.

posted on: November 16, 2005

Thursday, November 17

Materials:
Write Source – pg. 298-299

Students will go to the media center to check out books.

Activity 1:
In table groups students are to share their beginning paragraphs.

Activity 2:
Using the information on the outline for response to literature and Write Source – pg. 298-299, students are to write their first rough draft of the 3 middle paragraphs for the response to literature.

Or

Students who are making the PowerPoint, an iMovie, or a webpage must complete a storyboard instead of a rough draft in paragraph format. The PowerPoint, iMovie, or webpage must utilize all of the information on the PowerPoint template (including the focus statement with the theme).
Student Options:
The Plot Diagram Template could be used to generate any of the following:
PowerPoint
Web Page
iMovie

The required criteria for this assignment is the same as the material on the PowerPoint template.
Reminder to students: The focus statement should be included on the theme slide.

Homework:
Reading:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Students may read the book they selected for the book chat. Complete an entry on your reading log.
Night Write:
Complete the 3 middle paragraphs for the response to literature or the storyboard for the alternate assignment.

posted on: November 16, 2005

Wednesday, November 16

Materials:
Write Source - pg. 294-297

Warm Up:
What is a focus statement?

Activity 1: Using the formula on page 294 and the handout, write a focus statement.

Activity 2: Using Write Source pg. 295-296 students will review the organization of the response to literature. Students will check the order of their key events in their outline (handout).

Activity 3:
Students will write the 1st paragraph of their rough draft.

Graded Papers Returned:
Talking Points for Book Chat

Student Options:
The Plot Diagram Template could be used to generate any of the following:
PowerPoint
Web Page
iMovie

The required criteria for this assignment is the same as the material on the PowerPoint template.
Reminder to students: The focus statement should be included on the theme slide.

Homework:
Reading:
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log.
Night Write:
Students need to complete the beginning paragraph of their rough draft. Be sure the 1st sentence identifies the title, author, character, background information, and ends with the focus statement.

posted on: November 16, 2005

Tuesday, November 15

Warm Up:
Reflect on Monday’s book chat and complete the framed paragraph.

November 14,2005 was a memorable day at school because_________________. This _______________ opportunity allowed for me to experience __________________.
While participating in the event, I felt ____________________________. I was amazed when ______________________________. Meeting an author, such as Mr. Blumenthal, was __________________________. Preparation for this educational experience was_________________________. A moment that I want to remember is ________________________ An event that I was eager to share with my book chat group was_______________. While reading __________________________________ (Write the title of the book you read.), connections to my personal life were __________________________. A testimonial for the book chat experience would be _________________________________. Overall, Monday, November 14 in language arts was ______________________________________.

Activity 1:
Read your chapter book for 30 minutes, complete an entry on your reading log, and answer the following:
Why did the author write this book?
To persuade
To entertain
To inform

What is the message the author is communicating to the reader?

Title and Author of the book


Paper Collected on Monday To Be Graded:
Talking Points for Book Chat

Paper Collected on Tuesday To Be Graded:
Book Chat Reflection Warm Up

Homework:
Night Write - Complete the outline for Response to Literature (handout given last week).
Reading - Read for 30 minutes in your chapter book and complete an entry on your reading log

posted on: November 15, 2005

Monday, November 14

The big day is here! The book chat schedule is:

Students come back from Connections and go directly to the theater. Students will sit with their 3rd period class.
10:40-11:20 guest speaker Scott Blumenthal
11:25-12:17 3rd period
12:20-1:50 lunch 12:25-12:50 and 4th period Parents should meet us in the room at 12:50
1:55 - 3:03 5th period
3:05 - 4:15 6th period

posted on: November 10, 2005

Friday, November 11

Warm Up:
Appetizers – pg. 21

Activity 1:
Complete all of the talking points on “Talking Points” for the book chat

Activity 2:
Have a practice at the book chat. Students will “chat” about their books in their table groups.

Reading:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Students may read the book they selected for the book chat. Complete an entry on your reading log. The reading of the book chat book should bee completed by now.

Night Write: Make sure the responses to each Talking Point proves that you really read the book.

Book Chat Info:
The schedule for this fabulous day will be:
Students come back from Connections and go directly to the theater. Students will sit with their 3rd period class.
10:40-11:20 guest speaker Scott Blumenthal
11:25-12:17 3rd period
12:20-1:50 lunch 12:25-12:50 and 4th period Parents should meet us in the room at 12:50
1:55 - 3:03 5th period
3:05 - 4:15 6th period

posted on: November 10, 2005

Friday, November 11

The schedule for this fabulous day will be:
Students come back from Connections and go directly to the theater. Students will sit with their 3rd period class.
10:40-11:20 guest speaker Scott Blumenthal
11:25-12:17 3rd period
12:20-1:50 lunch 12:25-12:50 and 4th period Parents should meet us in the room at 12:50
1:55 - 3:03 5th period
3:05 - 4:15 6th period

posted on: November 09, 2005

Thursday, November 10

Materials:
Book Chat Book
Sticky notes/flags
Write Source – pg. 293

Handouts:
“Talking Points” for the book chat
Character Chart
Response to Literature Outline

Overheads:
“Talking Points” for the book chat
Response to Literature Outline

Warm Up:
What is a testimonial?

Activity 1:
Share examples of testimonials. Model the thinking of writing a testimonial. Students are to write a testimonial for their book chat book.

Activity 2:
Complete the Response to Literature Outline. You may refer to Write Source – pg. 293 for assistance.

Reading:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Students may read the book they selected for the book chat. Complete an entry on your reading log. The book chat book will need to be completed by 11/12.
Night Write:
All of the statements on the Book Chat Talking Points are to be completed and brought to the book chat.

posted on: November 09, 2005

Response to Literature Option

The Plot Diagram Template could be used to generate any of the following:
PowerPoint
Web Page
iMovie

The required criteria for this assignment is the same as the material on the PowerPoint template.
Reminder to students: The focus statement should be included on the theme slide.

posted on: November 08, 2005

Wednesday, November 9

Students will be going to the writing lab today to complete the essays.

Activity 1:
Each table will put their rough drafts together and complete a final copy of an essay that would describe how the classroom of the future would look.


Book Chat 11/14)Information:

The schedule for the fabulous book chat will be:
Students come back from Connections and go directly to the theater. Students will sit with their 3rd period class.
10:40-11:20 guest speaker Scott Blumenthal
11:25-12:17 3rd period
12:20-1:50 lunch and 4th period
1:55 - 3:03 5th period
3:05 - 4:15 6th period
A lot of volunteers have agreed to send in paper plates. Therefore, I have more than enough paper plates. More cookies, chips, etc. would be greatly appreciated. Seeing you on 11/14 is greatly anticipated.

Reading:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Students may read the book they selected for the book chat. Complete an entry on your reading log. The book chat book will need to be completed by 11/12.
Night Write:
Complete one (which should be the 5th talking point) of the “Talking Points” for the book chat.

posted on: November 08, 2005

Monday, November 7

Please remember the book chat is one week from today. Parents are invited to come during their student's class time.
10:40-11:20 guest speaker Scott Blumenthal
3rd 11:25 - 12:17
4th and lunch 12:20 - 1:50
5th 1:55 - 3:03
6th 3:05 - 4:15

Warm Up:
Brainstorm 6 ideas that would describe how the classroom of the future would look.

Activity 1:
Give One Get One – Students have 3 minutes to go around the room and add 6 more ideas to their list. They are to give 1 idea and get one idea from another student to complete a list of 12 ideas that would describe how the classroom of the future would look. Write some of these ideas on the overhead. Each student is to write a rough draft of an essay that would describe how the classroom of the future would look.

Reading:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Students may read the book they selected for the book chat. Complete an entry on your reading log. The book chat book will need to be completed by 11/12.
Night Write:
Take a writing vacation.

posted on: November 07, 2005

Friday, November 4

Friday, November 4
Materials:
Book Chat Book
Sticky notes/flags
Write Source – pg. 292-293

Handouts:
Talking Points for the book chat
Character Chart, Focus Statement, and Outline for a Response to Literature


Overheads:
Talking Points for the book chat
Character Chart, Focus Statement, and Outline for a Response to Literature


Warm Up:
Appetizers – pg. 20

Activity 1:
Model how to use a sticky flag or sticky note to mark the answer to one of the Talking Points for the book chat
Character Chart, Focus Statement, and Outline for a Response to Literature

Activity 2:
Students are to read the bottom of pg. 292
“When people talk about the theme of a book or short story, they are talking about the message the story tells about life. One way to discover the theme in a book or story is to ask yourself what the main character learns.”
Students are to read the bottom of page 293.
“ Your interest in the character and the theme should come through in your essay. Be sure to select details that show you care about this story.”

Activity 3:
Model key events in “Cinderella” that show changes in the character. Under each event, list specific details that you might include in your interpretation. Using the Character Chart, Focus Statement, and Outline for a Response to Literature list key events that show the important changes in the character. Under each event, list specific details that you might include in your interpretation.

Reading:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Students may read the book they selected for the book chat. Complete an entry on your reading log. The book chat book will need to be completed by 11/12.
Night Write:
Complete one (which should be the 3rd talking point) of the “Talking Points” for the book chat.

posted on: November 01, 2005

Thursday, Nov. 3

Media Center – Students will complete a bibliography card on a newspaper article.
Students will have the opportunity to check out a book.

Handouts:
Genre Chart needs to be maintained by each student. This will be documentation that they have completed the stated standard of reading a variety of genre.

posted on: November 01, 2005

Wednesday, November 2

Materials:
Book Chat Book
Sticky notes/flags
Write Source – pg. 291-292

Handouts:
Talking Points for the book chat
Character Chart, Focus Statement, and Outline for a Response to Literature


Overheads:
Talking Points for the book chat
Character Chart, Focus Statement, and Outline for a Response to Literature


Warm Up:
What is a response to literature?

Activity 1:
In table groups students will share the 1 Talking Points for the book chat they completed.

Activity 2:
Model the Character Chart, Focus Statement, and Outline for a Response to Literature
using “Cinderella.” Students are to complete the character chart from 3 characters in their book chat book.

Reading:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Students may read the book they selected for the book chat. Complete an entry on your reading log. The book chat book will need to be completed by 11/12.
Night Write:
Complete one (which should be the 2nd talking point) of the Talking Points for the book chat.

posted on: October 30, 2005

Tuesday, November 1

Materials:
Book Chat Book
Sticky notes/flags

Handouts:
Talking Points

Overheads:
Talking Points


Warm Up:
Last night I _____________________ in the neighborhood, and then I _____________.
Experiencing Halloween as a 7th grader _______________________________. A lesson learned from last night’s experience would be _____________________________. Showing a sense of responsibility was important, for the reason that____________________. Therefore, I _________________________________. All in all Halloween 2005 was _______________________, since__________________. Halloween 2005 will be remembered, because ___________________________.

Activity 1:
Go over the Talking Points for the book chat. Students are to read their book chat book for 30 minutes and place the sticky notes/flags in appropriate places.

Activity 2:
Students will have a book chat at their table discussing the following:
Title
Author
Exposition
Important statement (quote)
Memorable moment

Activity 3:
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and answer the following:
What special words does the author use to help me visualize the story?
What pictures did the author leave in my mind?
What do I like about the way the author has written the story?

Papers Collected to be Graded:
Framed Paragraph Warm Up.

Homework:
Reading:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Students may read the book they selected for the book chat. Complete an entry on your reading log. The book chat book will need to be completed by 11/12.
Night Write:
Complete one of the Talking Points for the book chat.

posted on: October 30, 2005

Monday, October 31

Materials:
Write Source – pg.289-290
Sticky notes/flags

Overhead:
Talking Points

Warm Up:
Quick Writes – “That Girl” by Gary Soto
List 5 statements that come to your mind after reading this poem. Select 1 line in the poem; write as specifically all that comes to your mind, letting the line lead your thinking.

Activity 1:
Work through the sample response to literature with students, pointing out the elements that make this essay a good response to literature.
Ideas
Organization
Voice
Word choice

Activity 2:
In table groups students are to answer the “Respond to the reading” at the bottom of pg. 290. Share with the class.

Activity 3:
Go over the Talking Points for the book chat. Students are to read their book chat book and place the sticky notes/flags in appropriate places.

Graded Papers Returned:
Elements of Fiction Spelling Test

Homework:
Take a homework vacation, and be safe when trick or treating.

posted on: October 30, 2005

Friday, October 28

Warm Up:
Appetizers – pg. 19

Activity 1:
Students will take a spelling quiz on the vocabulary for the elements of fiction.

Activity 2:
Using their reading logs, students will update the number of books they have read. Students will report the number of books read so far toward the goal of 25. A minimum of 12 book should be read by winter break.

Papers Collected to Be Graded:
Spelling Quiz on the vocabulary for the elements of fiction.

Homework:
• Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Complete an entry on your reading log.
• Night Write:
Students are to take a writing vacation.

posted on: October 21, 2005

Thursday, October 27

Materials:
Write Source – pg. 351-352

Overheads:
Vocabulary for the Elements of Fiction

Warm Up:
Define the following:
Mood
Tone
Protagonist
Antagonist
Conflict
Setting


Activity 1:
Students will share examples of each element from a story or book they have read from last night’s night write.

Activity 2:
Using the Vocabulary for the Elements of Fiction overhead, have a casual conversation with students explaining the meaning of the terms. Students will need to know the meaning of these terms. Students will take a spelling quiz on these terms on Friday, October 28, 2005

Activity 3:
Students will read their chapter book and write down the issue causing the conflict, the antagonist, and the protagonist.

Homework:
• Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Complete an entry on your reading log.
• Night Write:
Students are to study the spelling of the vocabulary for the elements of fiction.

posted on: October 21, 2005

Wednesday, October 26

Materials:
Write Source – pg. 351-352

Overheads:
Vocabulary for the Elements of Fiction

Plot Line


Warm Up:
List the elements of a plot.

Activity 1:
Share the examples of theme from last night’s night write.

Activity 2:
Using the Vocabulary for the Elements of Fiction overhead, have a casual conversation with students explaining the meaning of the terms. Students will need to know the meaning and the spelling of these terms. Students will take a spelling quiz on these terms on Friday, October 28, 2005.

Activity 3:
Display the Plot Line overhead and have students give examples of each element from “Cinderella.”

Collected Papers To Be Graded:
Examples of theme from last night’s night write

Graded Papers Returned:
Reflection Log for Personal Narrative
Book Selection

Homework:
• Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Complete an entry on your reading log.
• Night Write:
Students are to give examples of each Vocabulary for the Elements of Fiction
from a story or book they have read.

posted on: October 21, 2005

Tuesday, October 25

Overheads:
Talking Points

Warm Up:
Develop a definition of theme.

Activity 1:
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes looking for inferences. Students are to write for 2 inferences found in their reading using the following formula:


What I Learned
+What I Know
= Inference

Activity 2:
Students will discuss the Talking Points giving examples of each one from the information they just read.

Papers Collected to Bo Graded:
Inference Formula


Homework:
• Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Complete an entry on your reading log.
• Night Write:
Students are to name books or stories they have read that contain similar themes (This homework assignment will be collected for a grade.):
Family and friends are valuable gifts.
Growing up means accepting responsibility,
Understanding one’s culture and heritage often leads to greater self-insight.
People can accomplish great things by working together.

posted on: October 21, 2005

Monday, October 24

Materials:
Write Source – pg. 287-288
Book Chat book

Overheads:
Understanding Theme


Warm Up:
Appetizers – pg. 18

Activity 1:
Return “Nail-Biting warm-up from Friday and have students share with their table group. Ask a few students to share their response with the class.

Activity 2:
Write a paragraph describing why you selected the book that you did for the book chat. Share with the table groups. A few students can read their paragraph aloud to the class.

Activity 3:
Show the Understanding Theme overhead, and walk students through the definition and examples of theme. Encourage students to be looking for the theme in their novel as they are reading.

Papers Collected To Be Graded:
Reflective Log For Personal Narrative Unit


Graded Papers Returned:
Reading Log
Rough Draft
Personal Narrative Essay – students may rework, correct errors, and resubmit for a higher grade.

Homework:
• Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Complete an entry on your reading log.
• Night Write:
Students are to revise, edit, and resubmit their personal narrative to e-rater (if your score was 4 or 5). All students scoring a 6 may take a writing vacation.

posted on: October 21, 2005

Friday, October 21

Handouts:
Reflective Log For Personal Narrative Unit


Overheads:
Talking Points For Book Chat

Warm Up:
Nail Biting Quick Write


Warm Up:
Nail Biting Quick Write – Students will read the story on the orange sheet on their table. Students are to write 5 “I Learned” statements about information read in the story. Then students are to write for 3 minutes about a bad habit they or someone they know can’t break. Please collect these papers.

Activity 1:
Students will complete a reflection log on the personal writing unit of study. This will be collected for a test grade.
As a class, go over each item on the test with examples:
1. This piece shows that I’m able to use_________, _________, ________ in my narrative writing because…

Ask the class to give criteria or guidelines that are specifically for writing a personal narrative. Some of the answers should be:
3 types of dialogue
a lesson learned
beginning, middle, and ending paragraphs
sensory details

2. This piece shows I really understand the content because…
Ask the class to give some specific examples of responses. . Some of the answers should be:
I used…
3 types of dialogue when I explained…
a lesson learned which was…
beginning, middle, and ending paragraphs when I…
sensory details to describe…

3. If I could show this piece to anyone, I would show it to _______________ because…

Students need to explain specifically what they have included in this paper that they have not in any other piece of writing.

4. People who knew me last year would never believe this piece because…

What evidence does the student explain in their writing that shows improvement in their writing from last year?

5. The most challenging part of this writing piece was ____________ because…

Students need to identify the most challenging part of writing this paper. Explain why this part was such a challenge.


6. My (parents, friend, teacher)(Circle one.) liked this piece because…


When students conferred (talked with) a peer, a friend, a teacher, a parent; what was a positive comment made on this piece of writing?


7. One thing I have learned about myself is…

Students are to identify and explain the work ethic involved in the completion of this assignment. What was involved in completing each of the steps in the writing process?


8. I still have questions about…

What are some of the areas of the writing process or the specific criteria for writing a personal narrative that needs more work? “None” is not an answer.


Comments:
Students are to write any comments they want me to know in order to improve the teaching of this unit or comments in the areas of this unit that were the most helpful.
Activity 2:
Go over the Talking Points (with examples) as a whole class. Students are to complete this assignment as they are reading the selected book chat book.
1. A quote (or quotes) from this book that has the most impact on my life is (are) ...and explain why.
As students are reading their book chat book, they are to put a sticky note by a quote they feel has an impact on their life. As they read the book, students will have more than one quote. Upon the completion of the reading of the book, students will have to prioritize their quote selections.


2. If the author of this book were here today, I would ask him or her the following questions.
Some suggestions for questions to the author might be:
What event and/or person in your personal life was/were influential in the writing of this book?


3. "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you," is one of life's little lessons. Some of "life's lessons" I learned from this book are...

What was the message the author wants to give to the reader? This is the same thing as the theme of the book.


4. The character(s) in this book that I can personally identify with are ... and explain why.

Examples:
Same hobbies
Same age
Similar physical appearance
Similar personality
Similar relationship with parents

5. A testimonial for this book would be...

A testimonial is a brief (one sentence will do) statement that names a character and gives a hint about the theme of the book. Testimonials include opinions such as: This book is a page turner because…
This book will keep you on the edge of your seat, because…

6. The most amazing part(s) of this book is (are)...

Explain the event that became an “ah-ha” moment?

7. An incident or incidents from this book to share would be...
In your opinion describe the most exciting incident in the book that you feel a peer and/or parent would enjoy reading.

8. The themes about life presented in this novel relate to my daily life in the following ways:

Identify the theme of this book and describe how the lesson relates to your life.

Homework:
Students are to have Book Chat Parent Letter and Talking Points signed, if they did not have it signed yesterday. Also, students need to ask an adult to be their reading buddy for the book chat on 11/14 and decide on the book that will be read.
• Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Students may read the book they selected for the book chat. Complete an entry on your reading log.
Night Write: Complete, proofread, and fine-tune the reflective log assignment.

posted on: October 16, 2005

Thursday, October 20

Students will go to the media center to check out books and to continue their study of technology terms necessary for research.

Papers Collected to Be Graded:
Reading Log

Homework:
Students are to have Book Chat Parent Letter and Talking Points signed, if they did not have it signed yesterday. Also, students need to ask an adult to be their reading buddy for the book chat on 11/14.
• Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Students may read the book they selected for the book chat. Complete an entry on your reading log.


posted on: October 16, 2005

Wednesday, October 19

Materials:
Summaries of Book Choices

Book Chat Parent Letter and Talking Points

Warm Up:
DOL

Activity 1:
Share the results of the submitted essays. Students may go back into the Prentice Hall site and make corrections. This corrected essay may be submitted again.

Activity 2:
Author visit and book chat assignment information will be shared.

Activity 3:
The class will discuss the completion of the Narrative Writing Reflection Log. Students will complete the Narrative Writing Reflection Log for a test grade.

Collected Papers To Be Graded:
Narrative Writing Reflection Log

Homework:
• Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Complete an entry on your reading log.
Night Write:
• Students are to finish the reflective log, if they did not complete it in class.


Homework:
Students are to have Book Chat Parent Letter and Talking Points signed. Also, students need to ask an adult to be their reading buddy for the book chat on 11/14.
• Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Complete an entry on your reading log.
• Night Write:
Students are to write why they selected the reading buddy that they did.

posted on: October 09, 2005

Monday and Tuesday, October 17 and 18

Students will go to the Writing Lab and type in their final copy of the personal narrative onto the Prentice Hall site. Students will need to print a final hard copy of their personal narrative and then submit their essay into e-rater. I will share the results with each student on Wednesday, October 19.

Papers Collected to Be Graded:
3 rough drafts

Homework:
• Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Complete an entry on your reading log.
• Night Write: Take a writing vacation, if you have submitted your personal narrative.

posted on: October 09, 2005

Thursday, October 13

Materials:
Literature text – pg. 412-422

Warm Up:
Appetizers – pg. 15 Students are to have 3 minutes to complete this activity. Ask a student to present this test item to the class.

Activity 1:
Review the beginning of “Rikki-tikki-tavi” and review the elements of plot.

Activity 2:
Following the step-by-step guide the teacher presents, students will read silently and discuss the story from the introduction of the character Nag on page. 411 to Rikki’s pride in himself on pg. 422.

Activity 3:
As a whole class discuss the literary analysis of the story on pg. 423 of the text.

Activity 4:
Assign each table one of the “Thinking About Literature” items on page 422. Give the table groups 5 minutes to complete the answer to their question. Have one person from each table present the answer to the question to the rest of the class.

Homework:
• Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Complete an entry on your reading log.
• Night Write:
Students are to finish revise and edit their 3rd rough draft of their personal narrative.

posted on: October 09, 2005

Wednesday, October 12

Materials:
Each student will need their chapter book.
Making Judgments Bookmark


Warm Up:
Appetizers – pg. 14 Students are to have 3 minutes to complete this activity. Ask a student to present this test item to the class.

Activity 1:
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log. Students will remain in their assigned seats for this activity.

Activity 2:
Students are to complete the questions on the Making Judgments Bookmark
on the bookmark. Please collect these papers.

Please tell students to bring their literature book to class on Thursday.

Homework:
• Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Complete an entry on your reading log.
• Night Write:
Students are to finish revise and edit their 3rd rough draft of their personal narrative.

posted on: October 09, 2005

Tuesday, October 11

Activity:
Students will go to the writing lab and type their 3rdd rough draft of their personal narrative onto (if they didn't finish on Monday) Prentice Hall Site for E-Rater.
Each student will go through each section of the revision checker with their rough draft. Students will copy and paste their personal narrative into Microsoft Word. After each end mark, students are to press enter twice. Students will need to print out this 3rd rough draft. Students will submit their final copy on Tuesday, October 18.

Homework:
• Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Complete an entry on your reading log.
• Night Write:
Students are to finish revising and editing their 3rd rough draft of their personal narrative. Students need to make sure that transitions are used to prevent any 2 sentences beginning with the same word and they have 1 beginning paragraph, 3 middle paragraphs (refer to the information in the blocks in the middle of the writing outline handout, and an ending paragraph.

posted on: October 09, 2005

Author Visit and Book Chat on November 14, 2005

The Author Visit and Book Chat Nov. 14, 2005 will be an experience of a lifetime. A summary and the reading level of each of the books are explained in the attached document.
Happy Reading

posted on: October 08, 2005

Author Visit and Book Chat on November 14, 2005

The Author Visit and Book Chat Nov. 14, 2005 will be an experience of a lifetime. A summary and the reading level of each of the books are explained in the attached document.
Happy Reading

posted on: October 08, 2005

Friday, October 7

Materials:
Write Source – pg.125-128

Handouts:
Narrative Writing Checklist and Rubric
Peer Response Sheet


Warm Up:
Appetizers – pg. 13

Graded Papers Returned:
Outline for Writing a Personal Narrative


Papers Collected to Be Graded:
Reading Log = # of books read
Writing Analysis

Activity 1:
Working with their group of 3 writing buddies, students will participate in peer editing with the entire personal narrative writing piece. The reader will complete a response sheet and staple it to the writer’s rough draft. Each student should have 2 response sheets stapled to their rough draft.

Activity 2:
Using the information collected on the Peer Response Sheets, students are to write their 2nd rough draft.

Homework:
• Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Complete an entry on your reading log.
• Night Write:
Using the information collected in class from the Peer Response Sheets, students are to complete the writing of their 2nd rough draft. Students should refer to the Narrative Writing Rubric on the back of the Narrative Writing Checklist to assist in this assignment.

Remember: The entire personal narrative piece should have gone through each of the steps in the writing process
. These paragraphs should be typed on the Prentice Hall site, as well, if possible. www.phsuccessnet.com

posted on: September 28, 2005

Thursday, October 6

Materials:
Write Source – pg.125-128

Handouts:
Narrative Writing Checklist and Rubric

Warm Up:
What are some differences between revising and editing?

Activity 1:
Review the keys to effective editing pg. 125-128

Activity 2:
Students will apply the keys to effective editing to their writing piece.

Homework:
• Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Complete an entry on your reading log.
• Night Write:
Finish the rough draft of writing piece and continue the editing process that was started in class. Try to read this personal narrative aloud to a parent, sibling, or friend. Students should refer to the Narrative Writing Rubric on the back of the Narrative Writing Checklist to assist in this assignment.

Remember: The entire personal narrative piece should have gone through each of the steps in the writing process. Please refer to the Narrative Writing Checklist and the Narrative Writing Rubric for the completion of this assignment.
. These paragraphs should be typed on the Prentice Hall site, as well, if possible.

posted on: September 28, 2005

Wednesday, October 5

Materials:
Literature text – pg. 412-422

Warm Up:
Name the 5 elements of a plot.

Activity 1:
Review the beginning of “Rikki-tikki-tavi” and review the elements of plot.

Activity 2:
Following the step-by-step guide the teacher presents, students will read silently and discuss the story from the introduction of the character Nag on page. 411 to Rikki’s pride in himself on pg. 422.

Activity 3:
As a whole class discuss the literary analysis of the story on pg. 423 of the text.

Homework:
• Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Complete an entry on your reading log.
• Night Write:
Fine-tune the rough draft for your 15 minutes of Night Write tonight.

Remember: the 1st draft of your beginning paragraph and middle paragraphs must be written in pencil on every other line. These paragraphs should be typed on the Prentice Hall site, as well, if possible.


posted on: September 28, 2005

Tuesday, October 4

Tuesday, October 4
Materials:
Literature text – pg. 406-411

Overhead:
Dog and cat pictures

Warm Up:
Place the overhead on the overhead projector and have the students respond to:
Jot down your first reaction to the animals. Write some descriptive phrases, adjectives, or idioms that describe the often animosity (bitterness, ill feeling) between these animals. Share some of these responses aloud with the class.

Activity 1:
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and answer the questions on their “Making Judgments” bookmark given to them in homeroowm on Monday.

Activity 2:
Explore the associations we make between animal behaviors (aggression, stealth, curiosity) and human ones. Lead students to “Rikki-tikki-tavi” by telling them that they will read about animal enemies who engage in a “great war” that is made to seem as important as a human conflict.

Activity 3:
Read pg. 406-407 aloud to the students discussing mongooses, parts of a plot, conflict, and predicting along the way of the oral reading. Discuss and give examples of the vocabulary introduced on pg. 407. Have students read the exact sentence in the story where the vocabulary word appears and review the meaning.

Activity 4:
Following the step-by-step guide the teacher presents, students will read silently and discuss the story through the introduction of the character Nag on page. 411.

Homework:
• Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Complete an entry on your reading log.
• Night Write:
Fine-tune the rough draft for your 15 minutes of Night Write tonight.

Remember: the 1st draft of your beginning paragraph and middle paragraphs must be written in pencil on every other line. Students must be finished with their 1st rough draft beginning and middle paragraphs by Monday. These paragraphs should be typed on the Prentice Hall site, as well, if possible.

posted on: September 28, 2005

Monday, October 3

Materials:
Write Source – pg.113-124

Handouts:
Narrative Writing Checklist and Rubric
Writing Analysis

Papers Collected To Be Grades:
Outline for Writing a Personal Narrative
Students have worked on this document since Sept. 22.


Warm Up:
What are some differences between revising and editing?

Activity 1:
Discuss the keys to effective revising on pg. 113. Review the specific areas of revising on pg. 114-124

Activity 2:
Students will apply the keys to effective revising to their rough draft.

Activity 3:
Students will complete the Writing Analysis handout. Further revising will occur after the completion of this document. Students will need to make sure that no two sentences begin with the same word.

Homework:
• Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Complete an entry on your reading log.
• Night Write:
Finish the rough draft of writing piece and continue the revising process that was started in class. Try to read this personal narrative aloud to a parent, sibling, or friend. Students should refer to the Narrative Writing Rubric on the back of the Narrative Writing Checklist to assist in this assignment.

Remember: the 1st draft of your beginning paragraph, middle paragraphs, and ending paragraph must be written in pencil on every other line. These paragraphs should be typed on the Prentice Hall site, as well, if possible.

posted on: September 28, 2005

Friday, September 30

Friday, September 30
Materials:
Write Source – pg. 112

Handouts:
Narrative Writing Checklist and Rubric

Warm Up:
Appetizers – pg. 12

Activity 1:
Share orally a couple of the narratives from the beginning paragraph through the middle paragraph looking for:
Action words
Sensory details
Dialogue

Activity 2:
Read pg. 112 and discuss the purposes of the ending paragraph:
Reflect on the experience
Identify the lesson learned
Using this information and the example on pg. 112, students are to write the 1st rough draft of their ending paragraph.

Activity 3:
Students are to complete the narrative writing checklist up to the revising stage.

Homework:
• Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Complete an entry on your reading log.
• Night Write:
Using the papers circled in class by the student’s writing buddies, it will be clear how frequently action words, sensory details, and dialogue appear in the draft. This information along with the readers’ notes will provide feedback on where the writer can make the narrative stronger. Use this information to fine-tune the rough draft for your 15 minutes of Night Write tonight. Students must be completed with the beginning, middle, and ending paragraphs of their narrative writing piece.

Remember: the 1st draft of your beginning paragraph and middle paragraphs must be written in pencil on every other line. Students must be finished with their 1st rough draft beginning and middle paragraphs by Monday, October 3. These paragraphs should be typed on the Prentice Hall site, as well, if possible.

posted on: September 27, 2005

Thursday, September 29

Materials:
Write Source – pg. 110-111
1 red, 1 blue, and 1 green crayon or colored pencil per student

Warm Up:
Appetizers – pg. 11

Activity 1:
Students will get with a group of three and remember these writing buddies. Students will give their paper to the person on the right. Using a red crayon or colored pencil students are to circle each action verb they see in the paper so far. Students will then send this paper to the person on the right and circle in red all of the action verbs they see so far in the paper. Next the papers will be given to the original owner to see the circled action verbs.

Activity 2:
Students will get with a group of three and remember these writing buddies. Students will give their paper to the person on the right. Using a blue crayon or colored pencil students are to circle each sensory detail they see in the paper so far. Students are to write a brief note in the margin of the paper about how the example is used (ex. sensory details grabs the readers’ attention). Students will then send this paper to the person on the right and circle in blue all of the sensory details they see so far in the paper. . Students are to write a brief note in the margin of the paper about how the example is used (ex. sensory details grabs the readers’ attention). Next the papers will be given to the original owner to see the circled sensory details and the comments in the margin.

Activity 3:
Students will get with a group of three and remember these writing buddies. Students will give their paper to the person on the right. Using a green crayon or colored pencil students are to circle each use of dialogue they see in the paper so far. Students are to write a brief note in the margin of the paper about how the example is used (ex. Shows speaker’s personality, add information, keep action moving). Students will then send this paper to the person on the right and circle in green all of the uses pf dialogue they see so far in the paper. Students are to write a brief note in the margin of the paper about how the example is used (ex. Shows speaker’s personality, add information, keep action moving). Next the papers will be given to the original owner to see the circled uses of dialogue and the comments in the margin.

Homework:
• Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Complete an entry on your reading log.
• Night Write:
Using the papers circled in class by the student’s writing buddies, it will be clear how frequently action words, sensory details, and dialogue appear in the draft. This information along with the readers’ notes will provide feedback on where the writer can make the narrative stronger. Use this information to fine-tune the rough draft for your 15 minutes of Night Write tonight.

Remember: the 1st draft of your beginning paragraph and middle paragraphs must be written in pencil on every other line.

posted on: September 27, 2005

Wednesday, September 28

Materials:
Write Source – pg. 110-111
Outline for Writing a Personal Narrative
(Students worked on this document Thursday and Friday of last week.)

Warm Up:
What makes you beginning paragraph of your personal narrative a proper introduction to the rest of your narrative?

Activity 1:
Read pg. 110-111 aloud to the students with the students following along in their books. Be sure to stress the information in the left margins on the example in Write Source.

Activity 2:
Using the main ideas and details section of the Outline for Writing a Personal Narrative,
students are to write the middle paragraphs of their narrative. They are to begin their middle paragraphs at the end of their beginning paragraph. Students will need to be reminded that they must write this rough draft in pencil, in cursive, and write on every other line. The middle paragraphs must include:
• Sensory details to 4 of the 5 senses
• Chronological order (1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc.)
• Dialogue used in 2 places
o Speaker’s personality
o To keep the action going

Homework:
• Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Complete an entry on your reading log.
• Night Write:
Finish writing 1st rough draft of the middle paragraphs for your narrative using the example on page 110-111 in Write Source.

Remember: the 1st draft of your beginning paragraph and middle paragraphs must be written in pencil on every other line.


posted on: September 27, 2005

Friday, September 23

Materials:
Write Source – 107-109

Warm Up:
What is a clincher sentence?

Activity 1:
Share last night’s night write with the student’s at your table.

Activity 2:
Review the keys to effective writing on page 107.

Activity 3:
Divide your papers into thirds, as you would a business letter.
Label the 3 areas Beginning, Middle, and Ending. Write the events of your experience in the appropriate section. As you are reviewing your details, begin thinking about an attention grabbing beginning that starts in the middle of the action and an ending that helps the reader understand what the writer learned.

Activity 4:
Discuss the 3 ways to start your narrative using the examples on page 109. Write one of each kind described on page 109. Share with a partner and get feedback on which is the most effective in getting the reader’s attention.

Homework:
• Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Complete an entry on your reading log.
• Night Write:
Write the beginning paragraph for your narrative using one of the 3 examples on page 109.

Remember: the 1st draft of your beginning paragraph must be written in pencil on every other line.


posted on: September 21, 2005

Thursday, September 22

Handouts:
Writing Outline

Materials:
Write Source – pg. 105-106; 126; 488; 572-573; 556

Warm Up:
What is chronological order?

Returned Graded Papers Last Monday:
Verb Quiz
Sun-Mandala Project: The purpose of this project to make sure students are comfortable with the physical aspects of using color, shape, and understand the relationship of what they draw to what they think, say, or write.

Activity 1:
Share last night’s night write with the student’s at your table.

Activity 2:
Complete Writing Outline using the information you wrote in your organizing thoughts and ideas.

Activity 3:
Review the use of transitions to make the sentences and the paragraphs flow smoothly.

Activity 4:
Using page 105 in Write Source as a model, make a sensory chart for your experience. Then write down words or phrases that describe events in your Quick List. Have students work with a partner to share each sensory chart to make sure that the information includes sensory details and also shows their feeling. Students should refer to page 488 in Write Source for addition help with using sensory details in writing.

Activity 5:
Using page 106 in Write Source as a model, review how to use dialogue effectively in a narrative. Plan to use dialogue in at least 3 places in your essay.

Homework:
• Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Complete an entry on your reading log.
• Night Write:
Complete the writing outline, if you did not finish it in class.
Add sensory details and use dialogue in 3 places in your rough draft. In the margin of your paper, identify the following:
Beginning
Middle
End
I saw…
I heard…
I smelled…
I felt…
Lesson learned

Remember: the 1st organization of your thoughts and ideas must be written in pencil on every other line.

posted on: September 21, 2005

Narrative Writing Guidelines for Sept. 20-October 7

This document provides the nuts and bolts for success with the narrative writing assignment.

Guidelines for the Narrative Writing Assignment

posted on: September 20, 2005

Tuesday, September 20

Students will go to the media center to work with Mrs. Hendrix on technology terms.
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes, and will have an opportunity to check on the reading levels of their books, as well as, check out a challenging book in a different genre than their last book read.

posted on: September 15, 2005

Wednesday, September 21

Materials:
Write Source – pg. 102-104

Warm Up:
Why is it important to plan, draft, revise, edit, and publish a personal narrative?

Activity 1:
Read aloud Stephanie’s Ponytail and discuss examples of understanding conclusions. Students will need to have readers understand and draw conclusions from their narrative writing piece.

Activity 2:
You’ve identified some possible experiences to write about. Now you need to think about what you have learned from each of them. Make a chart with the 3 experiences you starred from the sentence starters on the left side of the paper and the lesson learned from each experience on the right side of the paper. Then circle the experience you could write about in your narrative. Write nonstop about your circled topic for 5 minutes to see what you remember. Also answer the 5 W and H questions about your topic. If you can’t come up with enough details try another topic. Refer to page 103 in Write Source.

Homework:
Read your challenging chapter book for 30 min. and write an entry on your reading log.
Night Write: Write nonstop for 15 minutes about your topic to see what you can remember.

posted on: September 14, 2005

Monday, September 19

Materials:
Write Source – pg. 97-100

Overhead:
T-Chart

Warm Up:
Quickwrite Activity: "On Being Asked to Select the Most Memorable Day in my Life:

Activity 1:
Using Write Source – pg. 97 have students describe a personal narrative.
A personal narrative is a story that tells about you. It tells about:
• What you did
• What happened to you
• What you learned from the experience

Activity 2:
Have students complete a T – Chart and share answers.

Activity 3:
Understand the goal of writing a personal narrative using Write Source – pg. 98

Activity 4:
Walk through the sample personal narrative (using Write Source – pg. 99-100) emphasizing beginning, middle, end, ideas, organization, voice and word choice.

Collected Papers:
Progress Reports

Graded Papers Returned:
Verb Quiz
Sun-Mandala Project

Homework:
• Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Complete an entry on your reading log.
• Night Write: Complete the following sentence starters to help you choose a topic that both you and your reader will enjoy:
1. I was helpful when…
2. I was inspired when…
3. I was exhausted when…
4. I was excited when…

Put stars next to 3 ideas that you think would make interesting topics for a personal narrative.

posted on: September 14, 2005

Friday, September 16

Materials:
Individual student sun-mandala

Handouts:
Rubric for the sun-mandala
Progress Reports - given to each student today

Warm Up:
What is a personal narrative?

A personal narrative is a story that tells about you. It tells about:
• What you did
• What happened to you
• What you learned from the experience

Activity 1:
Share sun-mandala using the museum technique.

Activity 2:
Complete the quiz on verbs


Collected Work:
Sun-Mandala project
Verb quiz

Homework:
Have your progress report signed.

Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book
Topic:
Work 15 minutes on the sun-mandala project. Finish the entire Sun-Mandala project if you did not turn it in today. You will need to turn in the final project with the completed checklist with all assignments stapled to the checklist.
If you turned in the project, you may select a topic of your choice for your night write for the weekend.


posted on: September 14, 2005

Thursday, September 15

Materials:
Individual student sun-mandala
WAG – pg. 326-329

Handouts:
Instructions for the Sun-Mandala
Checklist for the Sun-Mandala Assignment


Warm Up:
Appetizer’s – pg. 10

Activity 1:
Answer any questions about the completion of the sun-mandala project.

Activity 2:
Read aloud the “Key Concept” section on pg. 326-328. After each “read aloud”, complete exercise 1 and then exercise 2 orally as a whole class.

Activity 3:
As a table group students should complete the section review on pg. 329 exercises 23-24. Go over the answers.

Activity 4:
Students will finish the writing process free form map.

Students will have a quiz on verbs on Friday, September 16.

Online practice for the quiz on verbs can be found at:
www.phsuccessnet.com
Students will log in with their password. Click on the grammar book; click on 15.1 and work through 15.3.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book
Topic:
Work 15 minutes on the sun-mandala project. Finish the entire Sun-Mandala project by Friday, Sept 16. You will need to turn in the final project with the completed checklist with all assignments stapled to the checklist.www.phsuccessnet.com

posted on: September 14, 2005

Wednesday, September 14

Wednesday, September 14

Materials:
Individual student sun-mandala

Handouts:
Instructions for the Sun-Mandala
Checklist for the Sun-Mandala Assignment

Warm Up:
Appetizer’s – pg. 9

Activity 1:
The sun-shadow sentences will be written around the edges of the mandala, which will provide a frame for the drawing. The following directions are for the writing of the sun-shadow sentences:

1. Write a single sentence using all of your sun signs. See how you can weave all of those images together in one sentence.
2. Weave your 7 sun-shadow signs into 1 sentence.
3. Write both of these sentences around the outside of your mandala.

Examples of Personal Mandala Sun-Shadow Sentences:

1) The thirteen daisies on the square table were set on fire by the canary that lived among the rocks.
The seven red sapphires were stolen from the pyramid by an eagle that lived in the mighty oak, and were cast into the ice.

2) The circle of sunlight pierced the redwood branches to reveal a lone dolphin swimming just beneath the surface of the diamond blue ocean.
The lines of moonlight cast shadows upon the unkept sheep pasture which, once graced with a myriad of orange roses, now lay empty, dotted with rock and puddles from yesterday’s rain.

Activity 2:
Put the finishing touches on the writing process free form map

Bring WAG book to class on Thursday.

Progress reports go home with students on Friday, September 16.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book
Topic:
Work 15 minutes on the sun-mandala project. Finish the entire Sun-Mandala project by Friday, Sept 16. You will need to turn in the final project with the completed checklist with all assignments stapled to the checklist.


posted on: September 13, 2005

Tuesday, September 13, 2005

Materials:
Individual student sun-mandala

Handouts:
Checklist for the Sun-Mandala

Warm Up:
Quickwrites

Activity 1:
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes looking for the characters in their reading.

Activity 2:
Students will have the opportunity to work on their sun-mandala project.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book
Collect/respond/react/reflect daily in his/her Write To Learn (3-5 pages per week plus accurate completion of reading log daily)
Topic:
Work 15 minutes on the sun-mandala project. Finish the entire Sun-Mandala project by Friday, Sept 16. You will need to turn in the final project with the completed checklist with all assignments stapled to the checklist.


posted on: September 04, 2005

Monday, September 12, 2005

Materials:
Individual student sun-mandala

Handouts:
Checklist for the Sun-Mandala


Warm Up:
Quickwrites

Activity 1:
The sun-shadow sentences will be written around the edges of the mandala, which will provide a frame for the drawing. The following directions are for the writing of the sun-shadow sentences:

1. Write a single sentence using all of your sun signs. See how you can weave all of those images together in one sentence.
2. Weave your 7 sun-shadow signs into 1 sentence.
3. Write both of these sentences around the outside of your mandala.

Examples of Personal Mandala Sun-Shadow Sentences:

1) The thirteen daisies on the square table were set on fire by the canary that lived among the rocks.
The seven red sapphires were stolen from the pyramid by an eagle that lived in the mighty oak, and were cast into the ice.

2) The circle of sunlight pierced the redwood branches to reveal a lone dolphin swimming just beneath the surface of the diamond blue ocean.
The lines of moonlight cast shadows upon the unkept sheep pasture which, once graced with a myriad of orange roses, now lay empty, dotted with rock and puddles from yesterday’s rain.

Activity 2:
Fine-tune/finish sun-mandala using the rubric handout.

Quiz on verbs on Wednesday, September 14.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book
Collect/respond/react/reflect daily in his/her Write To Learn (3-5 pages per week plus accurate completion of reading log daily)
Topic:
Work 15 minutes on the sun-mandala project. Finish the entire Sun-Mandala project by Friday, Sept 16. You will need to turn in the final project with the completed checklist with all assignments stapled to the checklist.

posted on: September 04, 2005

Thursday, September 8, 2005

Materials:
Write Source – pg. 480-485

Warm Up:
Appetizers – pg. 6

Activity 1:
Read the explanation of choosing verbs aloud to the students on pg. 480. Have students work individually to complete the “Try It” exercise. Go over the answers.

Activity 2 – 6:
Read the explanation of the topic on each page to the students on pg. 481-485. Each page needs to be completed and the answers discussed, before moving on to another page. Have students work individually to complete the “Try It” exercise(s). Go over the answers.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book
Collect/respond/react/reflect daily in his/her Write To Learn (3-5 pages per week plus accurate completion of reading log daily)
Topic: Student choice

posted on: September 04, 2005

Wednesday, September 7, 2005

Materials:
Unlined paper – 1 sheet per student
Markers
Crayons

Handouts:
Instructions for the Sun-Mandala
Checklist for the Sun-Mandala Assignment


Warm Up:
Quickwrites – My Life

Activity 1:
To fill out the 2nd column, students need to express the single characteristic or quality that represents the underlying reason for each choice and place that “quality” word in the 2nd column in the chart. This activity will require thinking. Using a dictionary, a thesaurus, or each other will be beneficial in finding the most appropriate. A lot of discussion needs to occur at this point, so students can help each other select words with the right nuances and connotations. Students may find that another student has selected the same animal; however, their reasons for that selection are very different. One student may be like a lion because of its strength, another because of its voraciousness.

Activity 2:
After the completion of the 2nd column, students are ready to move to the idea of opposites. At this point students are asked to move outward, or sun images, to the inward aspects of their lives and generate a shadow image for each of the 7 categories that will make up the mandala.

Students are to look at the quality they wrote to their animal image. Using a thesaurus as a guide, students should fill in line 1 in the 3rd column with an antonym of the word used in the 2nd column. Make sure that these two words are the same part of speech. For example, if their sun quality is intense, for the panther, their shadow quality might be lethargic rather than lethargic.
Students write the name of an object that is most like (has the quality of) the adjective written in the 3rd column. For example, the word lethargic might have been written in the 3rd column. Now the student thinks of the most lethargic animal they know. This could be a cow. The word cow would be written in the 4th column.

Activity 3:
Students will write shadow sentences using a core sentence, such as “Inwardly, I am like a _______________________________________________ because
_______________________________________________.”

Activity 4:
Within the framework of a circle, using color and shape, but no words, students will draw or symbolize all of their sun images and all of their shadow images. These images may be arranged any way the student wants. Students may want to consider how they place things in relation to each other or consider only the way the colors and shapes look together. The artistry of the mandala is not important. Students are encouraged to use symbols, if they can not draw well. For example, a simple drawing of the footprint if a bear can stand for a bear. Students will discuss how to symbolize something they can not draw. During this activity students will need to consider relationships among the symbols (depicted by size, color, placement, interaction), deepening insights into the character.

Bring WAG book to class on Thursday

posted on: September 04, 2005

Tuesday, September 6, 2005

Handouts:
Aerobics of the Mind – phase 1
Aerobics of the Mind Phase 1

Activity 1:
Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes looking for the setting (time and place).

Activity 2:
Students will receive phase 1 of Aerobics of the Mind. A detailed discussion will explain the reading program.

Activity 3:
Students will have an opportunity to check out books in a different genre than their last one in the media center.

Activity 4:
Mrs. Hendrix will continue the instruction of important technology terms.
Homework:
Have the Aerobics of the Mind Phase 1 handout signed.
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book
Collect/respond/react/reflect daily in his/her Write To Learn (3-5 pages per week plus accurate completion of reading log daily)
Topic:
Explain how you will adhere to Aerobics of the Mind.

posted on: September 04, 2005

Thursday, Sept. 1

Materials:
Thesaurus

Overheads:
Word Expansion

Sentence Expansion
The lady went to the party.

Introduction to Narrative Writing

Warm Up:
Rambling Autobiography

Activity 1:
Students will review the writing process in Write Source pg. 4-28 using their scanning skills.

Activity 2:
Students will complete the free form map ( the one started on 8/31 about the Writing Process)

Activity 3:
Sentence Expansion OH (2)will be used to demonstrate the importance of using a thesaurus in the writing process. On the word expansion overhead students will see the difference a more specific word can make. Students will use the sentence on the sentence expansion overhead plus a thesaurus to improve the words: lady, went, and party.

Activity 4:
What stories have you seen or read that describe an exciting experience?
What made them exciting?
What experiences have you had that were exciting? What made them exciting?
What is an important learning experience you have had?

Personal narratives allow readers to experience the thrill of your life stories and learn from them.
Tells:
What you did
What happened to you
What you learned from the experience
When I… I learned…

Exit Pass:
List the steps in the writing process.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book
Collect/respond/react/reflect daily in his/her Write To Learn (3-5 pages per week plus accurate completion of reading log daily)
Topic:
Fine-tune "When I…I Learned…"

posted on: August 31, 2005

Guidelines for Narrative Writing Piece

Guidelines for Narrative Writing will explain to students each specific requirement of this assignment. Assessment pieces are included, as well.

posted on: August 30, 2005

Friday, Sept. 2, 2005

Overheads:
Directions for Sun Mandala

Handouts:
Instructions for the Sun-Mandala

Warm Up:
Appetizers – pg. 5

Activity 1:
Ask students to move into a quiet, receptive frame of mind, and write down their answers to the following questions on the sun mandala chart. There is no discussion at this point, but students will have ample opportunities to talk later.

Selecting the Sun Images
What animal are you like most?
What plant are you most like?
What color are you most like?
What shape are you most like?
What number are you most like?
What mineral or gem are you most like?
What natural element are you most like: air, earth, fire, or water? (Students may n\select some aspect of the element or the entire category: breeze, hurricane, or tornado for air, for example; or mountain, desert, or beach for earth.)
Students are to complete the first column on the Sun Images chart

These 7 symbols become the sun images of the mandala. The concept of the sun image arises naturally from the method of arriving at these images in a thoughtful, conscious manner, in “the light of the day” as we say.

Activity 2:
Students will write a sentence for each of their specific symbols.
Students may use the following core sentence as they think through their primary reason for selecting each of their sun images.

Suggested Core Sentence:
I am like the (sun image) because, like the (item), I _____________________.

Student Examples:
I am most like the poison oak because, like poison oak, I am harmless until I’m stepped on.

I am most like a giraffe because, like a giraffe, my vision extends beyond my reach.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book
Collect/respond/react/reflect daily in his/her Write To Learn (3-5 pages per week plus accurate completion of reading log daily)
Topic:
Finish Core Sentences

posted on: August 30, 2005

Wednesday, August 31, 2005

Materials:
Write Source pg. 4-28

Warm Up:
How does each step in the writing process help in creating a better final product?

Activity 1:
Students will review the writing process in Write Source pg. 4-28.
Complete a free form map of the writing process.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book
Collect/respond/react/reflect daily in his/her Write To Learn (3-5 pages per week plus accurate completion of reading log daily)
Topic:
When I…I Learned…

posted on: August 29, 2005

Tuesday, August 30, 2005

Materials:
Literature book
Newsprint
Markers

Overhead:
Model of free form map

Warm up:
How does each step in the writing process help in creating a better final product?

Collected Papers:
Reading Log including to the number of books actually completed by 8/30 (including books read this summer with the proper documentation).

Activity 1:
Students will read their chapter book and determine the attitude of the author (the tone) of their reading.

Activity 2:
Working in table groups, students will complete the free form map (they began yesterday)of the key points in “Seventh Grade”.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Be sure that the one-sentence summary on the reading log entry includes who, what, when, where, why.
Collect/respond/react/reflect daily in his/her Write To Learn (3-5 pages per week plus accurate completion of reading log daily).


posted on: August 29, 2005

Monday, August 29, 2005

Materials:
Literature book
Newsprint
Markers

Overhead:
Model of free form map
Example of a Free Form Map


Warm up:
Appetizers - pg. 4

Activity 1:
Review the vocabulary, characters, theme, conflict, tone, and idioms.
Complete the directed reading of the last 2 pages of “Seventh Grade”

Activity 2:
Each table will draw 1 card from the envelope and answer that number question on page 121. Share with the class.

Activity 3:
Model a free form map with overhead. Working in table groups, students will create a free form map of the key points in “Seventh Grade”.

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Be sure that the one-sentence summary on the reading log entry includes who, what, when, where, why.
Collect/respond/react/reflect daily in his/her Write To Learn (3-5 pages per week plus accurate completion of reading log daily). Students may select a topic for tonight's Night Write.

posted on: August 29, 2005

Friday, August 26, 2005

Students will go to the media center to:
1. find the reading level of their books
2. begin a study of computer terms

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Be sure that the one-sentence summary on the reading log entry includes who, what, when, where, why.
Collect/respond/react/reflect daily in his/her Write To Learn (3-5 pages per week plus accurate completion of reading log daily).

posted on: August 25, 2005

Wednesday, August 24

Materials:
Write Source – pg. 4-28
Literature book pg. 114-115
LCD
Computer
Gary Soto’s narrative on the Prentice Hall website (video)
Immigration video from literature book
Portfolios

Warm Up:
Appetizers – pg. – 3

Activity 1:
Complete quiz on nouns and pronouns.

Activity 2:
Model a free form map.
Review the Writing Process Write Source – pg. 4-28
In table groups students are to create a free form map emphasizing the key concepts in the writing process plus a 1 sentence summary in less that 15 words. Basically, answer… “What’s in it for me?”

Activity 3:
Distribute portfolios to students, and have them write their name, etc. on the folder. Students will file their letter they wrote to me the first week of school.

Activity 4:
Explain the background of “Seventh Grade” by showing the immigration video on the Prentice Hall website.

Collected Paper:
Quiz on nouns and pronouns

Homework:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Be sure that the one-sentence summary on the reading log entry includes who, what, when, where, why.
Collect/respond/react/reflect daily in his/her Write To Learn (3-5 pages per week plus accurate completion of reading log daily)
Topic::
Why is the writing process beneficial to use when generating a piece of writing?


posted on: August 23, 2005

Tuesday, August 23, 2005

Tuesday, August 23
Materials:
Write Source – pg. 4-28
WAG – chapter 14 (nouns and pronouns) review pg. 310-311 exercises 25-33

Warm up:
How will it help a writer to know the parts of speech when writing a sentence?

Activity 1: Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log (including who, what, when, where, why in their summary statement).

Activity 2: Complete the chapter review exercises 25-33 in chapter 14 on nouns and pronouns pg. 310-311 with your table group. The class will discuss the answers.


Quiz on parts of nouns and pronouns on Wednesday August 24.
Bring literature book to class on Wednesday, August 24.


Homework:
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book
Collect/respond/react/reflect daily in his/her Write To Learn (3-5 pages per week plus accurate completion of reading log daily)
Possible topic:
Getting used to this 7th grade language arts class has been ______________ because…
I know I will need to…
Or
Possible topic:
Why is the writing process beneficial to use when generating a piece of writing?
Maintain a reading list of books read

posted on: August 21, 2005

Monday, August 22, 2005

Materials:
WAG chapters 14 pg. 294-307
Write Source – pg. 468-498

Overheads:
Reading log

Handouts:
Reading log (if necessary)

Warm Up:
DOL
Share Night Writes completed at home last night with students at your table.

Returned Papers:
Quiz on the 4 types of sentences
Last week's Night Writes

Activity 1:
Using the OH model review the completion of several reading log entries

Activity 2:
Review “How can I use words effectively in my own writing?” (Write Source – pg. 468-498)

Activity 3:
Review Chapter 14 in WAG pg. 294-307. In table groups students complete exercises 6-10 on pg. 300 and exercises 18-21 on pg. 309. The class will discuss the correct responses.

Homework:
Quiz on parts of nouns and pronouns on Wednesday August 24.
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book
Collect/respond/react/reflect daily in his/her Write To Learn (3-5 pages per week plus accurate completion of reading log daily)
Possible topic:
When I am not in school, my favorite activity is_________________ because…
Maintain a reading list of books read


posted on: August 21, 2005

Reading Log

Reading Log

The reading log is the daily documentation students complete. The one sentence summary must include the answers to who, what, when, where, and why.

posted on: August 18, 2005

Friday, August 19, 2005

Materials:
Write Source – pg. 468-498
WAG chapter 14 pg. 296-307

Handouts:
Quiz on the 4 types of sentences (pg. 87-88 in the WAG Workbook)

Warm Up:
DOL

Share your best Night Write of the week with students at your table.

Activity 1:
Quiz on the 4 types of sentences

Activity 2:
Independently students will answer the following questions using Write Source – pg. 468-498. The following are a list of the questions with the answers.

1. How can I use words effectively in my own writing?
Using nouns
Using pronouns
Choosing verbs
Describing with adjectives
Describing with adverbs
Connecting with prepositions
Connecting with conjunctions
2. What can I do with nouns in my writing?
a. Using concrete, abstract, and collective nouns
b. Using proper and common nouns
c. Using general and specific nouns
d. Show possession
e. Rename the subject
f. Make the meaning of the verb complete
g. Add specific information
3. How can pronouns improve my writing?
a. Avoid repeating nouns
4. How can I use pronouns properly?
a. Avoid agreement problems (Pronoun and its antecedent)
i. Agreement in number
ii. Agreement in person
iii. Agreement in gender
5. What else should I know about pronouns?
a. Make your references clear
6. How can I use verbs effectively?
a. Choosing verbs: Writers must constantly make choices, and one of their most important choices is which verb to use to express their thoughts clearly.
i. Action verbs
ii. Linking verbs
iii. Helping verbs
iv. Irregular verbs
b. Show powerful action
c. Create active voice
d. Show when something happens (past, present, future)
7. How else can I use verbs?
a. Show special types of action
b. Form verbals
i. Gerunds
ii. Participles
iii. infinitives
8. How can I strengthen my writing with adjectives?
a. Describing with adjectives
b. Comparative and superlative
c. Use sensory details
d. Form extra-strength modifiers
e. Include adjectives in the predicate
f. Be general or specific
9. How can I use adverbs effectively?
a. Describing with adverbs
i. Comparative and superlative adverbs
ii. Describe actions
iii. Add emphasis
iv. Express frequency
v. Be precise
10. How can I use prepositional phrases?
a. Add information (use as an adjective to describe either a noun or a pronoun
11. How can I use conjunctions?
a. Connect a series of ideas
b. Expand sentences (with coordinating conjunctions)

Students will share their answers with the students at their table.

Activity 3:
Review Chapter 14(pg 296-307)in WAG on nouns and pronouns.


Collected Papers:
Quiz on the 4 types of sentences
1 best Night Write of the week


Homework:
Collect/respond/react/reflect daily in his/her Write To Learn (3-5 pages per week plus accurate completion of reading log daily)
Possible topic: The grade I want in this class is ______________. I know I will need to….
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book and complete an entry on the reading log. The one sentence summary must include the answers to who, what, when, where, and why.

posted on: August 18, 2005

Thursday, August 18, 2005

Materials:
Write Source – pg. 518
WAG (Writing and Grammar)– Chapter 21 Section 1 Pages 456-458

Warm up:
Appetizers – pg. 3

Activity 1:
Using Write Source – pg. 518 review the 4 kinds of sentences with students giving oral examples.

Activity 2:
In table groups students are to write 4 sentences (one declarative, one interrogative, one imperative, and one exclamatory) describing the 1st two days in this class. Share with the class.

Activity 3:
In table groups complete the exercise in Write Source on the bottom of pg. 518.

Activity 4:
Each student goes through their initial letter to me and number each sentence. On a sheet of paper (or on the back of the letter) number you paper with the same numbers you placed on your sentences in the letter. Write the type of sentence for each of your sentences in your letter.

Activity 5:
As a table group students will complete exercises 2-4 (Chapter 21 Section 1 Pages 456-458) in WAG
In table groups students are to complete Exercise 5 (page 459) and share with the class.


Find It in Your Reading Read this declarative sentence from Tiger: A Biography of Tiger Woods. Write an imperative sentence, an interrogative sentence, and an exclamatory sentence that might have been part of Earl Woods’s lecture to his son.
Earl’s lecture, delivered at decibels with which Tiger was unfamiliar, centered on the theme that golf owes no one anything, least of all success, and that quitting is a flagrant foul, intolerable.


Quiz on 8/19 on the 4 types of sentences

Homework: standing HW assignment for the entire year
Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book
Collect/respond/react/reflect daily in his/her Write To Learn (3-5 pages per week plus accurate completion of reading log daily)
Possible topic: After the 1st week of 7th grade, I have realized…
Maintain a reading list of books read

posted on: August 17, 2005

Wednesday, August 17, 2005

Students will go to the MAC lab to register for the Prentice Hall site. This site goes along with the texts for this course. Students will be able to use tutorials with audio and video cli[ps to explain a concept and assist students through practice activities. Also, students will be able to enter their required writing pieces on this site and receive specific feedback in less than 30 seconds. Students will be able to use this information to improve their writing piece at school or at home.

The site address is www.phsuccessnet.com

posted on: August 16, 2005

Types of Sentences

These sites will help students identify 4 types of sentences. Students will also be able to practice capitalization and punctuation skills.
http://www.harcourtschool.com/activity/clubhouse/index_pre.html

http://palc.sd40.bc.ca/palc/Quiz/sent-type1.htm

http://www.mce.k12tn.net/dogs/fern/sentences/online_lesson2.htm

http://www.pb5th.com/test/writing/4sent_potc.htm#

posted on: August 15, 2005

Tuesday, August 16

Materials:
Write Source – pg. 518
Overhead with different types of sentences

Warm up:
Appetizers – pg. 2

Returned Papers:
1st attempt at the exit pass: These may be corrected and turned in to me again.
Letter to Me
Brochure
Syllabus

Activity 1: Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log. The one-sentence summary must include the answers to who, what, when, where, why.

Activity 2:
Using Write Source – pg. 518 review the 4 kinds of sentences with students giving oral examples.

Activity 3:
In table groups students are to write 4 sentences (one declarative, one interrogative, one imperative, and one exclamatory) describing the 1st two days in this class. Share with the class.

Activity 4:
Using an overhead with different types of sentences, volunteer students will come up and place the type of sentence word with the example of the sentence. Then students will draw a type of sentence and give an oral example.

Activity 5:
In table groups complete the exercise in Write Source on the bottom of pg. 518.

Activity 6:
Each student goes through their initial letter to me and number each sentence. On a sheet of paper (or on the back of the letter) number you paper with the same numbers you placed on your sentences in the letter. Write the type of sentence for each of your sentences in your letter.

Exit Pass:
What do you think is necessary in order for a writer to produce a clear and coherent text? Why is the answer to this essential question important in the completion of your letter to me?

Homework: Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log. Students will write for 15 minutes on any topic they select. By Friday students should have 3 to 5 pages of these night write entries.
Students may go to the Tutorial/Learning Links category of this blog to find practice exercises on the 4 types of sentences.

posted on: August 15, 2005

Monday, August 15, 2005

OH: Reading log with samples entries

Handouts: reading log to be stapled in each student's agenda


Students will go to the media center to:
1. make a list of 10 items you dream/think about
2. select a chapter book that is on their independent reading level
3. learn how to complete a correct reading log entry
4. participate in a book swap to become familiar with making a challenging and interesting choice of book to read

Students will receive a reading log. They must staple this to the inside of their agenda.

Homework: Students will read their chapter book for 30 minutes and complete an entry on their reading log. Students will write for 15 minutes on any topic they select. By Friday students should have 3 to 5 pages of these night write entries.

posted on: August 15, 2005

Friday, August 12

Handouts:
How to Keep a Notebook

Warm Up:
Appetizers pg. 1

Papers Collected:
Signed brochure
Signed syllabus
Summer Reading Activities

A literature and a grammar text will be issued today. Students are to put a cover on these two textbooks.


Activity 1:
Distribute and give students time to read and ask questions regarding the information on the “How To Keep a Notebook.” Show an example of a language arts notebook.

Activity 2:
In table groups share best part of one of your summer reading selections, other than The Tiger Rising.

Activity 3:
Write a letter to me explaining what you hope to get out of this class this year.

Closure:
What do you think is necessary in order for a writer to produce a clear and coherent text? Why is the answer to this essential question important in the completion of your letter to me?

Exit pass:
Letter to me explaining what you hope to get out of this class this year.

Homework:
Bring summer reading activities to class. Using “How To Keep a Notebook” handout, set up your language arts notebook.


posted on: August 11, 2005

Aug. 11

Handouts:
How to Keep a Notebook

OH:
What do you think is necessary in order for a writer to produce a clear and coherent text?

Papers Collected:
Signed brochure
Signed syllabus
Summer Reading Activities

Warm Up:
What do you think is necessary in order for a writer to produce a clear and coherent text?

Activity 1:
Review the information in the LA Brochure and share information about the behavior management plan. Distribute and give students time to read and ask questions regarding the information on the “How To Keep a Notebook.”

Activity 2: Students will complete the Carousel Brainstorming activity started on Monday, if necessary.

Activity 3:
In table groups share best part of one of your summer reading selections, other than The Tiger Rising.

Activity 4:
Write a letter to me explaining what you hope to get out of this class this year.

Closure:
What do you think is necessary in order for a writer to produce a clear and coherent text? Why is the answer to this essential question important in the completion of your letter to me?

Exit pass:
Letter to me explaining what you hope to get out of this class this year.

Homework:
Bring summer reading activities to class. Using “How To Keep a Notebook” handout, set up your language arts notebook.


posted on: August 09, 2005

Wednesday, August 10

Welcome to a stress free class! Opportunities to become proficient readers and writers abound in ways you can't even think of right now.

Wednesday, August 10

Materials:
OH – List everything you have read in the last 24 hours.
OH of seat assignments
Large newsprint
Signs for the carousel brainstorm stations
Markers – 1 for each group

Handouts:
Language Arts Brochure
Syllabus


Warm Up:
List everything you have read in the last 24 hours.
Share responses with classmates at your table.

Activity 1:
Make sure students are sitting in their assigned seats.
Welcome and share a few responses from warm up as a class

Activity 2:
Distribute and give students time to read and ask questions regarding the information on the LA brochure and the syllabus. Show example. Show iMovie made by last year's students about Mrs. Abrams' language arts class.

Activity 3:
Complete the carousel brainstorming activity that results in group summary paragraphs regarding The Tiger Rising. In table groups students rotate every 2 minutes to a station and answer the posted question. The following are the posted questions:

 If Billy Threemonger were a tree, what kind would he be and why?
 If Norton Threemonger were a vehicle, what type of vehicle would he be and why?
 If Rob were a plant, what type would he be and why?
 What advice would you give to Mr. Nelson?
 What could be the theme song for The Tiger Rising and why?
 If you were Rob’s doctor, what would be your diagnosis and why?
 What advice would you give to Rob about how to deal with bullies at school?
 “If you knew about something that was locked up in a cage, something big and beautiful that was locked away unfairly, for no good reason, and you had the keys to the cage, would you let it go?” (pg 93 Sistine asks Willie May). Why or why not?

The class will share the responses to each question.

Activity 4:
In table groups students write a summary (5-7 sentences) of The Tiger Rising using the information generated from the Carousel Brainstorming activity. Each table will share their summary with the class.

Homework-
Have the brochure and syllabus signed. Remind your parents to email me; therefore, I will have their email. Bring your summer reading assignments to class on Thursday.

posted on: August 09, 2005

Tuesday, October 3, 2006

Tuesday, September 20

Materials:
Write Source – pg. 102-104

Warm Up:
Why is it important to plan, draft, revise, edit, and publish a personal narrative?

Activity 1:
Read aloud Stephanie’s Ponytail and discuss examples of cause and effect.

Activity 2:
Have students read their challenging chapter book for 30 min. and write a list of 3 causes and 3 effects from their reading.

Collected Papers:
Cause/Effect

Homework:

Read for 30 minutes each night in a challenging chapter book. Complete an entry on your reading log.
Night Write:

You’ve identified some possible experiences to write about. Now you need to think about what you have learned from each of them. Make a chart with the 3 experiences you starred from the sentence starters on the left side of the paper and the lesson learned from each experience on the right side of the paper. Then circle the experience you could write about in your narrative. Write nonstop about your circled topic for 5 minutes to see what you remember. Also answer the 5 W and H questions about your topic. If you can’t come up with enough details try another topic.

posted on: January 01, 1970

Thursday, January 12

Research Plan Made Simple

Materials:
Write Source pg.


Warm Up:
Quick Write – pg. 32 “First Television”

Activity 1:
Share responses on Framework (Working Outline) with students at the table.

Activity 2:
Go over the Resources handout that will be used in the media center on 1/13/06.

Homework:
Reading
Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log.
Night Write
Complete Framework (Working Outline), if it is not already finished. Students will need to be ready to start documenting the resources they will be using on Friday 1/13, when they go to the media center.

posted on: January 01, 1970

Thursday, January 12

Research Plan Made Simple

Materials:
Write Source pg.


Warm Up:
Quick Write – pg. 32 “First Television”

Activity 1:
Share responses on Framework (Working Outline) with students at the table.

Activity 2:
Go over the Resources handout that will be used in the media center on 1/13/06.

Homework:
Reading
Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log.
Night Write
Complete Framework (Working Outline), if it is not already finished. Students will need to be ready to start documenting the resources they will be using on Friday 1/13, when they go to the media center.

posted on: January 01, 1970

January 13, 2006

Framework For Research


Students will be going to the media center. Mrs. Hendrix will guide the students in the completion of their resource handout and the framework outline handout.

Homework:
Reading
Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log.
Night Write
Students will need to complete the information on the resources they will be using for documentation in their research paper.

posted on: January 01, 1970

Thursday, January 12

Research Plan Made Simple

posted on: January 01, 1970

January 12

Research Plan Made Simple

Overheads:
Framework (Working Outline)
Resources

Handouts:
Writing Fair Application
Research Plan Made Simple

Materials:
Write Source pg.


Warm Up:
Quick Write – pg. 32 “First Television”

Activity 1:
Share responses on Framework (Working Outline) with students at the table.

Activity 2:
Go over the Resources handout that will be used in the media center on 1/13/06.

Homework:
Reading
Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log.
Night Write
Complete Framework (Working Outline), if it is not already finished. Students will need to be ready to start documenting the resources they will be using on Friday 1/13, when they go to the media center.

posted on: January 01, 1970

Thursday, January 12, 2006

Overheads:
Framework (Working Outline)
Resources

Handouts:
Writing Fair Application
Research Plan Made Simple

Materials:
Write Source pg.


Warm Up:
Quick Write – pg. 32 “First Television”

Activity 1:
Share responses on Framework (Working Outline) with students at the table.

Activity 2:
Go over the Resources handout that will be used in the media center on 1/13/06.

Homework:
Reading
Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log.
Night Write
Complete Framework (Working Outline), if it is not already finished. Students will need to be ready to start documenting the resources they will be using on Friday 1/13, when they go to the media center.

posted on: January 01, 1970

Wednesday, January 11

Warm Up:
What is the topic you chose for your research paper? Why?

Overheads:
Research Made Simple

Handouts:
Research Topics
Writing Fair Application
Research Made Simple

Materials:
Write Source pg. 381-386

Activity 1:
Share topic selections.

Activity 2:
Students will use the information from Research Made Simple

to begin the Framework (Working Outline). Research Made Simple

will be collected for a grade.

Homework:
Students will need 60 3" x 5" (lined or unlined) notecards by Friday, January 13.

Reading
Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log.
Night Write
Complete Framework (Working Outline) Side 1

posted on: January 01, 1970

Tuesday, January 9, 2006

Warm Up:
What is research?

Overheads:
Anticipation Guide
Research Plan Made Simple

Handouts:
Anticipation Guide
Research Topics
Narrow Down the Topic
Writing Fair Application

Materials:
Write Source pg. 381-386

Activity 1:
Discuss the definition of research and why we research? Working with a partner, students will complete the Anticipation Guide for Research.

Activity 2:
Walk through Write Source pg. 381-386 and discuss the model of the research paper.
Distribute the Topics handout and discuss the possibilities. Turn the handout over and complete the graph narrowing down the topic.

Activity 3:
Read your chapter book for 30 minutes and answer the following:
How do you feel about the way the story is told?
Is there anything about the way the author wrote that gave you enjoyment or cause you irritation?
What do you feel is the most significant passage from you reading? Page? Paragraph? Sentence?
Why is this passage important to you?
What makes this passage significant to the story?

Homework:
Reading
Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log.
Night Write
Complete Narrow Down the Topic on the back of the possible topics list. Prioritize your choices of topics.

posted on: December 31, 1969

Tuesday, January 10

Warm Up:
What is research?

Overheads:
Anticipation Guide
Research Plan Made Simple

Handouts:

Research Made Simple
Writing Fair Application

Materials:
Write Source pg. 381-386

Activity 1:
Discuss the definition of research and why we research? Working with a partner, students will complete the Anticipation Guide for Research.

Activity 2:
Walk through Write Source pg. 381-386 and discuss the model of the research paper.
Distribute the Topics handout and discuss the possibilities. Turn the handout over and complete the graph narrowing down the topic.

Activity 3:
Read your chapter book for 30 minutes and answer the following:
How do you feel about the way the story is told?
Is there anything about the way the author wrote that gave you enjoyment or cause you irritation?
What do you feel is the most significant passage from you reading? Page? Paragraph? Sentence?
Why is this passage important to you?
What makes this passage significant to the story?

Homework:
Reading
Read for 30 minutes and complete an entry on your reading log.
Night Write
Complete Narrow Down the Topic on the back of the possible topics list. Prioritize your choices of topics.

posted on: December 31, 1969

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