Making Learning Irresitable for Over 25 Years. Making Learning Irresitable for Over 25 Years.
Assignments: May 7 - May 11

Monday:

1. Return RECONSTRUCTION ACROSTIC
2. Share unique ideas of “If the South had won the Civil War”
3. Discuss briefly how life in America has changed since the war ended (it is now the time between 1865 and 1900).
4. Complete worksheet “Georgia Enters the Second Century of Statehood”

Tuesday:

1. Go over worksheet “Georgia Enters the Second Century of Statehood”
2. Watch Georgia Stories, Program 14
3. Homework: Read Chapter 15

Wednesday:

1. ACROSTIC on information in Chapter 15 with a partner. Students have to make the sentences about the chapter, as well as use specific vocabulary in the sentences.
2. This will count as a test grade

Thursday:

1. Finish ACROSTIC on Chapter 15
2. Read Chapter 17 and pages 270-273 of Chapter 18

Friday:

1. Open Book Test for Chapters 17 and 18

posted on: May 09, 2007

Assignments: April 30 - May 4

Monday:

1. Share test grades (tests will be returned on Tuesday – after Chorus and Orchestra students have taken the test)
2. Judge Chapter 14 Illustrations
3. Read poem “Thar’s More in the Man Than Thar Is in the Land” together and discuss
4. Students complete backside of worksheet – chart of Thought Questions – on own – read pages 206-207 to complete worksheet.

Tuesday:

1. Return tests.
2. Go over chart from yesterday.
3. The students will look over Georgia Labor Contract and answer 5 questions.
4. Class discussion about contract
5. The students will read pages 207-210 to prepare for note taking activity.
6. Take notes on pages 207-210 – teacher writes on overlay and students supply answers.

Wednesday:

1. The students will read pages 210-216 on their own and complete cloze activity with chart on “Political Reconstruction”

Thursday:

1. Go over cloze activity and chart as a class. The students can fill in any missing gaps on their sheets.
2. Watch Georgia Stories Program 10 – The Rise of Modern Georgia, Part I (Reconstruction and Growth)

Friday:

1. ACROSTIC on “RECONSTRUCTION” – This will be taken for a quiz grade.
2. Video: CSA: The Confederate States of America

posted on: April 27, 2007

Assignments: April 23 - April 27

Monday:

1. Video: Sherman’s March.
2. The students will answer questions as they watch the video.

Tuesday:

1. Discuss video from yesterday.
2. Share Civil War Journals and turn in.

Wednesday:

1. Finish sharing journals
2. Begin working on Chapter 13 Review Sheet.

Thursday:

1. Go over Chapter 13 Review Sheet.
2. Review game for chapter 13.

Friday:

1. Chapter 13 test.
2. Illustrate Chapter 14.

posted on: April 19, 2007

Assignments: April 16 - April 20

Monday:

1. Finish Civil War Notes
2. Introduce Project. This project will be due on Tuesday, April 24.


Tuesday:

1. Watch Georgia Stories II – The Civil War, Part I
2. Work on project.


Wednesday:

1. Civil War “Word Research” puzzle – pairs compete to see who can fill in sheet 1st for some sort of prize.
2. Work on project.


Thursday:

1. Watch Georgia Stories I – First Century of Statehood, Part IV (The Civil War) – Battle of Jonesboro, The Civil War and the Black Soldier, and Andersonville Prison.
2. Follow up video with questions related to topics featured in the video.


Friday:

1. Watch Georgia Stories II – The Civil War, Part II - March to the Sea and Thomasville: Playground of the Northern Industrialists.
2. Follow up video with questions related to topics featured in the video.
3. Work on project

posted on: April 13, 2007

Assignments: April 9 - April 13

Monday:

1. Return Chapter 12 Test
2. Review the causes of the Civil War. Discuss the naming of the war – how different people have named it different things such as: The War Between the States, The Civil War, Second American Revolution, The Rebellion, The War for Confederate Independence, War of Secession, War For Separation, The Insurrection, The War of Northern Aggression and The War. Why were so many names used to describe the same war?
3. Look at the picture of infantrymen on page 185 and discuss the dress of the soldiers –the difference in the way people dressed made it difficult sometimes on the battlefield because we tend to think of the North as blue and the South as gray.
4. Look at the illustration on page 184 and have the students examine what they see and share with class – demonstration in Ga. just after Lincoln’s election in 1860 – How do the people appear? Why? Why would southerners be upset with the election of Lincoln?
5. The Civil War Begins – worksheet – students are looking at the strengths and weaknesses of each side (North vs. South) prior to the war (which side should win all the battles and how quickly people thought this war would end). The students compare 10 different strengths and weaknesses, and then decide on the top 3 areas that are most important in battle and why.

Tuesday:

1. Go over strengths and weaknesses worksheet from yesterday and discuss the top three areas that are important
2. Put Civil War terms on the board (or overhead) and let students try to organize them as either Northern terms or Southern terms. These are terms used to describe each side during the war. There will be a quiz on this at the end of the week - - students will be given the terms (all mixed up) and they have to organize them as either North or South.

PUT ALL THE WORDS INTO 2 DIFFERENT GROUPS. GIVE EACH GROUP A LABEL (A WORD FROM THE LIST MAY BE USED AS YOUR LABEL): NORTH, KNOWN AREAS, SOUTH
YANKEES, CONFEDERATE, UNION, WASHINGTON DC, BILLY YANK, FEDERALS, JOHNNY REB, RICHMOND, BLUEBELLIES, BLUE, GRAY, LEE, GRANT, MAPS,

3. Read pages 184-188 and answer questions page 188.

Wednesday:

1. Go over textbook questions from yesterday.
2. Discuss the following question: “Do you think you would be willing to fight against someone in your own family in the Civil War based on your feelings about different political issues? Why/why not?
3. Review Civil War terms – remind students of quiz on Friday.
4. Map activity – War Divides The Nation
5. Read pages 188-191 and answer questions 1-4 on page 191


Thursday:

1. Go over map activity from yesterday
2. Watch DVD on Bull Run/Manassas and fill in movie guide.
3. Compare Johnny Reb and Billy Yank – worksheet – students are looking at the difference between the two soldiers during the war. Discuss as a class and have students fill in missing parts of their sheets.

Friday:

1. Quiz on Civil War Terms
2. Civil War Lecture

posted on: April 10, 2007

Assignments: March 26 - March 30

Monday:

1. Discuss “Road to Civil War” Packet
2. **Read pages 173, 176-178 and answer questions on page 178 (1-5)

Tuesday:

1. As a class, read a slave account of slavery vs. a defense of slavery – pages 174-175 and discuss.
2. Activity: “Reacting to Slavery”. These will be due on Wednesday.

Wednesday:

1. Share some letters from “Reacting to Slavery”
2. Work with a partner to complete Vocabulary Activity for Chapter 12. This will be taken as a quiz grade.
3. Read pages 178-182 and answer questions on page 180 (1-4) and page 182 (1-4)

Thursday:

1. Discuss questions from textbook.
2. Review Game

Friday:

1. Chapter 12 Test
2. Illustrate Chapter 13: The Civil War

posted on: March 23, 2007

Assignments: March 19 - March 23

Monday:

1. Return Chapter 11 Test
2. Share paragraphs from Friday
3. Discuss the economic differences between the North and the South prior to the Civil War.
4. Activity: “The South: Old Times Were Not Forgotten” and “North Before the War: Expanding Territories”

Tuesday:

1. The students will complete a framed paragraph to introduce Chapter 12.
2. The students will create a t-chart comparing Utica, NY vs. Rome, Ga. – pages 169 and 170. Discuss independent vs. interdependent as a class.
3. Complete “Growing Economic and Regional Differences” – The students will finish the for homework if not completed in class.

Wednesday:

1. Go over “Growing Economic and Regional Differences”
2. Read pages 168-173 and answer questions on page 169 (1-3) and page 173 (1-4)

Thursday:

1. As a class, we will go over the questions from textbook and discuss information about tariffs, states’ rights, sovereign, nullification, secede, secession, and territory.
2. The students will complete a map activity dealing with free states vs. slave states
3. As a class, we will discuss the importance of the equal number of each for representation in Congress.
4. Begin “Road to Civil War” Packet

Friday:

1. Finish “Road to Civil War” Packet and discuss
2. **Read pages 173, 176-178 and answer questions on page 178 (1-5).

posted on: March 16, 2007

Assignments: March 12 - March 16

Monday:

1. Quiz
2. Graphing Georgia’s Slave Population – The students will graph the increase in the number of slaves.

Tuesday:

1. The students will read pages 164-166 and fill in outline.
2. Begin chapter review worksheet.

Wednesday:

1. Watch Georgia Stories II, Program 6 - The Westward Movement, Part II
2. Finish chapter review – due tomorrow

Thursday:

1. Go over review
2. Play review game – “10 second game”

Friday:

1. Chapter 11 Test
2. After the test, the students will write a paragraph about what they think are the causes of the Civil War and why they think this (justify answers).

posted on: March 09, 2007

Assignments: March 5 - March 9

Monday:

1. Finish War of 1812
2. ACROSTIC – Trail of Tears

Tuesday:

1. Read “Samuel’s Memory” as a class and discuss.
2. The students will complete a graphic organizer and expanded sentence on Trail of Tears. This will be counted as a project grade and take the place of the chapter test.

Wednesday: EARLY RELEASE

1. Finish graphic organizer and expanded sentence activity started yesterday.

Thursday:

1. Picture analysis of UGA’s North Campus, Then and Now – As a class we will discuss the differences between 1840 and 2007.
2. Brainstorming Activity: What three things made cotton become “King” in the south.” (cotton gin, steamboat, and railroads)
3. Read pages 156-158 and fill in graphic organizer (just the parts that cover this section of reading)

Friday:

1. Work on Social Ladder – “Structure” of society
2. Read pages 158-163 and finish filling out graphic organizer
3. Quiz Monday

posted on: March 06, 2007

Assignments: February 26 - March 2

Monday:

1. Chapter 9 Test
2. Illustrate Chapter 10

Tuesday:

1. Return Chapter 9 Test
2. Judge Chapter 10 illustrations
3. Chapter 10 Agree/Disagree: The students will complete this on their own and then we will go over it as a class.
4. Read pages 138-142 and answer questions on page 140 (#1-4) and page 142 (#1-4) – due tomorrow.

Wednesday:

1. Go over homework
2. War of 1812
3.

Thursday:

1. Finish discussing War of 1812
2. “TRAIL OF TEARS” Acrostic
3. Read article about Cherokee regaining land in Georgia in 1993 – follow up with where this story is today.
4. Read pages 147 (Discovery of Gold Bring Trouble to Cherokees), 150-152 and answer questions on page 152 (#1-5)

Friday:

1. Read “Samuel’s Memory” and have students write a response to the story – do they feel it is all true, does it help explain why there is still hatred by Cherokees towards attitudes of white men, how did the story make them feel about US history, etc. Share some with the class – and turn in for a write to learn “quick write” grade.
2. Read poem “The Neverending Trail” and discuss
3. Start chapter project – *create a graphic organizer that tells the story of the Trail of Tears – there will be a rubric that explains the details of items that must be included. This will count as the test for the chapter – this will be due at the end of class on Monday, 3/5.

posted on: February 23, 2007

Assignments: February 21 - February 23

Wednesday:

1. Ask question – What could be created in Georgia that might draw people to move here? Railroads – able transport items and people to places they have never before been
2. The students will read pages 122-131 and complete CLOZE activity.

Thursday:

1. Go over the CLOZE activity from yesterday
2. Discuss different ways land was distributed: given away, Headright System, and land lotteries
3. Have mock land lottery and discuss – some students won’t get land, others will get land (some good pieces of land and some not, but these were all considered “fortunate drawers”) – reflect on if this might have made a difference on settlers coming South – knowing there was possible chance of not getting good land
4. Watch clip of land lottery in FAR AND AWAY

Friday:
1. Finish chapter with lecture and notes outline – pages 131-136

posted on: February 15, 2007

Assignments: February 12 - February 16

Monday:

1. The students will share their legislation topic and their own ideas about legislation with the class.
2. Sections 1, 2, and 3 of E-Congress packet are due.

Tuesday:

1. Finish sharing legislation
2. Go over and study “How a Bill Becomes a Law”
3. Bill Quiz on Wednesday

Wednesday:

1. Bill Quiz
2. The students will read pages 122-128 and answer questions 1-4 on page 126 and 2-4 on page 128.

Thursday:

1. Video: Lewis and Clark

Friday:

1. Finish video
2. Go over reading and answers to questions from the book

posted on: February 15, 2007

Assignments: February 5 - February 9

Monday:

1. E-Congress

Tuesday:

1. E-Congress

Wednesday:

1. Watch Georgia Stories I: Program 12 – State and Local Government
2. Students will read an article about the juvenile court system and come up with well constructed arguments stating their opinion on the topic of juvenile punishments
3. These arguments need to be ready for tomorrow’s discussion.

Thursday:

1. Round table discussion – juvenile court system – all students have to contribute to discussion – counts as a test grade for the day.
2. Have students generate a list of where they think we should spend our tax dollars: federal, state, and local – list as many areas in each category where money should go (for example: roads, school buildings, parks)

Friday:
1. Watch Georgia Stories I: Program 13 – State and Local Governmen
2. Look at and discuss where the money for the national cabinet/departments are spent each year. Share lists from students of where/on what they think the money should be spent.

posted on: February 05, 2007

Assignments: January 29 - February 2

Monday:

1. Return test and go over
2. Discuss political participation through voting – why people vote, why people wear a sticker that says they voted, how various groups go about getting people to vote (Rock The Vote – targets young people).
3. Qualifications for people to be able to vote – 18, registered, citizen, legal resident of state and…of course, not in prison.
4. How do polling places prevent fraud? Two types of dishonest voters: repeaters – vote several times in same election, and drifters – people that come from outside the state or election district that drift in to vote.
5. Registration process
6. Compare voting today with the past
7. Discuss Electoral College vs. popular votes for candidates
8. Introduce project for chapter – Break class into different sections (18-25 years of age, 25-45 years of age, 45 and up). Each pair is given a specific age group to target. The pair must create a poster (8 ½ X 11) that persuades their assigned age group to vote in an upcoming election – state or federal election.

Tuesday:

1. Continue with chapter project – needs to be completed by the end of class.

Wednesday:

1. Share projects .
2. Writing a member of Congress – students will be working with a partner
a.) discuss writing a member of Congress – General Assembly – follow guide
b.) students need to:

1.) Figure out who their district Senators/House Member is

2.) Decide on reason to write (see guide)
3.) Research issue/bill they will be writing about
4.) Write the letter – see guide to make sure all necessary information is included in letter. Print letter and turn in to teacher – some may want to share letter with the class.
**Students will have 2 days to work on this assignment.**

Thursday:

1. Finish activity from yesterday

Friday:

1. Take notes on how a bill becomes a law and discuss how the General Assembly affects our lives.
2. Have students think of something that is important to them and propose their own bill – write what the bill should be and why – as if your bill could REALLY be passed.
3. Share bill ideas with class – have class vote on which has the best idea and argument for having it passed.
4. **If needed – students need to answer Chapter Activities on page 401 – Reviewing Main Ideas #1-10, Give It Some Extra Thought - #1-2
5. Introduce E-Congress

posted on: January 26, 2007

Assignments: January 22 - January 26

Monday:

1. Bill of Rights Quiz
2. Share and turn in “Rights in Action” current events
3. Branches of Government Content Frame – finish for homework

Tuesday:

1. Go over Branches of Government Content Frame – have students copy any needed notes from transparency.
2. The Three Branches of Government – packet with computers (Organization of the Government, the Executive departments, qualifications and terms of office, and separation of powers).
3. Federal Government chart with word bank - have ready to go over tomorrow.

Wednesday:

1. Go over Federal Government chart
2. Compare Federal with local government
3. Finish Three Branches packet on computers – this was started yesterday with partner.

Thursday:

1. Go over chapter review sheet.
2. Play 10-second game to review for tomorrow’s test.


Friday:

1. Chapter 25 Test
2. After the test, the students will read Chapter 26 and complete “Give It Some Extra Thought” on page 391 – due Monday.

posted on: January 19, 2007

Assignments: January 15 - January 19

Monday:
NO SCHOOL: MLK Jr. Day

Tuesday:
1. Review “Democracy” – what it means, examples of it around the world, etc.
2. Review some responsibilities of being a good citizen of the United States.
3. Activity – “What Decisions Will You Make as a Citizen”

Wednesday:
Georgia Writing Test

Thursday:
1. Review “Democracy” and “Citizenship.”
2. Rights vs. Privileges – class discussion and compare/contrast guide
3. Assign “Rights in Action”

-Due on Monday, Jan. 22nd

-Students will use the newspaper or a news related magazine to show the Bill of
Rights in action
-Articles must be attached to worksheet.

4. Video: Future Fright: Losing the Bill of Rights
5. Begin filling in “Bill of Rights” Chart

Friday:
1. Continue filling in “Bill of Rights” Chart.
2. “Bill of Rights” Quiz
3. Begin learning about the branches of government, offices, and length of terms.

posted on: January 12, 2007

Assignments: January 8 - January 12

Monday:

1. Review information covered before the holiday break – Constitutional Convention, Constitutional Compromises, etc.
2. Have students, on own, fill in worksheet on Constitutional Convention and Compromises.
3. Go over worksheet together and have students fill in missing information.
4. Class work/homework: complete worksheet Ratification of the Constitution – due tomorrow.

Tuesday:

1. Go over Ratification of the Constitution worksheet.
2. Have students get with a partner to complete “Word Wall” activity - use words from chapters 23-25.
3. Introduce Chapter 23 – let students know that this chapter deals with the top issues that are dealt with each day by our government. The activity that the students will complete focuses on the importance of each of the 6 issues covered in the chapter.

-Put students in groups of 2-3.
-Each pair/group is assigned a topic from the chapter (some of the topics may be used more than once).
-Pairs/groups must come up with why their given issue is an important one for our country – why do people care about it – create a poster/brochure showing the importance – words can be included.
-Share with the class.
-This will count as the test grade for this chapter.

Wednesday:

1. Finish Chapter 23 activity and share – have class vote on the most persuasive (one that really demonstrates why America spends so much time and money dealing with this particular issue).
2. As a class, discuss why we should study government and the need for rules – refer to picture on page 364 of textbook. (may have to complete this tomorrow – depends on the time required to complete the chapter 23 activity).

Thursday:

1. Review the reasons to study government from yesterday – this is an introduction to Chapter 24.
2. Vocabulary development activity as an in-depth look into what democracy means.
3. Have students write down what the statement: “A government of, by, and for the people” means to them. Have students write down what each part means.

Friday:

1. Class discussion of “What are the responsibilities of citizens”: look at cartoon pictures on page 122 of We the People. Discuss the definition of the term “citizen” – students can add information to their notes sheet from yesterday.
2. Working with a partner, have students read over lesson 28 of We the People. Student pairs need to complete both the “Problem Solving” activity and “Reviewing and using the lesson” questions, as well as be ready to share answers with the class. For the “Problem Solving” section – students need to be ready to defend their answers. These will be turned in for a grade for the chapter.

posted on: January 07, 2007

Assignments: December 11 - 15

Monday:

1. The students will review for the Chapter 8 Test on Wednesday.
2. 30 Second Review Game
3. Don’t forget to study for the test.

Tuesday:

1. Chapter 8 Test
2. After the test, the students will read pages 114–120 in their Georgia Studies books to prepare for the next unit.
3. After reading, the students will answer questions 1-4 on page 118 and 1-3 on page 120.

Wednesday:

1. As a class, we will read an article describing the Articles of Confederation.
2. After the reading, the students will answer questions pertaining to the reading about the Articles of Confederation.
3. Lecture: The students will take notes using a graphic organizer as the teacher explains the strengths and weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation.

Thursday:

1. The students will be broken up into four groups and argue for and against the Articles of Confederation and whether or not a new constitution should be written.
2. Lecture: The students will take notes using a graphic organizer as the teacher explains the Constitutional Convention (who, what, where, and why).

Friday:

1. Lecture: The students will take notes using a graphic organizer as the teacher describes the Great Compromise, Three-Fifths Compromise, and Commerce and Slave Trade Compromise.
2. The students will complete a worksheet entitled “Ratification of the Constitution.”

posted on: December 08, 2006

Assignments: December 4 - December 8

Monday:

1. Quiz over Declaration of Independence and The Acts
2. Finish, share, and turn in Write to Learn from Friday
3. **Side note – share with students that 46 Georgia counties are named for people that played a role in the Revolutionary War – from Button Gwinnett to James Madison and Elijah Clarke.
4. Word search: The American Revolution
5. Homework: Read pages 109-111 and answer questions on page 111 “Locating Main Ideas” 1-4.

Tuesday:
1. Return and go over quiz.
2. Check and go over homework.
3. The students will create 2 Venn Diagrams – 1) Compare and contrast the advantages held by the British and Americans in the American Revolution and 2) Compare and contrast the disadvantages or obstacles that the British and Americans faced in the American Revolution. Share answers as a class.
4. Homework: Read pages 111-114 and answer questions on page 114 “Locating Main Ideas” 1-3.

Wednesday: (Early Release)

1. Check and go over homework.
2. Watch Georgia Stories I Program 6 – The First Century of Statehood, Part I (Georgia and the American Revolution).

Thursday:

1. Finish up any notes
2. Movie: “The Crossing”
3. The students will answer questions pertaining to the movie as they watch.

Friday:

1. Movie: “The Crossing”
2. The students will answer questions pertaining to the movie as they watch.

posted on: November 30, 2006

Assignments: November 27 - December 1

Monday:

1. Tri-Corn hat – KWL+ chart – complete K and W on own, and then go over together as a class putting items on the board for class to fill in on own sheets
2. Queen Yuckabella Rebellion Proclamation Activity – students read the new rules set about by Queen Yuckabella and react to them. The students will do this
individually first, then with a partner – the students will circle the rules they don’t like with explanations for each grievance.
3. Homework - Read pages 104-107 and answer ?’s 2 – 4 on page 107

Tuesday:

1. Continue with Queen Yuckabella Activity. Discuss as a class – sharing grievances and reasons for each.
2. Discuss how student’s parents still have control over them, and how they feel that they are just about ready to break away, and that they don’t like all of the rules they have to follow that are set up by their parents, etc.
3. Look at the Declaration of Independence and discuss how this document was sent to the king stating that the colonists wanted to break from their “Mother Country.” Read “Dear John” letter and discuss how this letter follows the same format as the Declaration of Independence in that the writer lets the reader know why she was breaking up him and how she felt people were supposed to treat one another in a relationship. Have students work with a partner to complete worksheet that breaks down the document into: reasons written, principles of how people should treat each other, complaints, and vision for the future. After students complete worksheet, go over together, and ask the question: “How do you think the king responded?” Do you think that you would have been willing to sign your name to such a document? What would your fear be of signing it? Would you sign with BIG letters or almost too small to be seen?
4. Start notes on the causes of the Revolutionary War – begin with a discussion of the term “Revolution” – not necessarily a war, but rather a change in life (political, cultural, economical, etc.)

Wednesday:

1. Continue notes on the causes of the Revolutionary War.
2. Complete “Costs and Benefits of Georgia Fighting” Activity – discuss and start creating posters and signs supporting their position (either benefit to join in war vs. costs of joining war)

Thursday:

1. Students spend a few more minutes creating their posters and signs – share to get support for the cause – as a class, discuss how the benefits for the future outweigh the costs of fighting the war.
2. Cartoon analysis of a person being Tarred and Feathered – complete cartoon analysis sheet – discuss as a class. This is a good indication of how colonists were feeling very patriotic about the cause and how anyone going against the cause would pay the price.
3. Homework – Unite or Die political cartoon analysis

Friday:

1. Discuss Unite or Die political cartoon, which was completed for homework.
2. Have students work with a partner to create a slogan in protest of England and the Acts that have been imposed upon them – share and display these slogans around the room.
3. Write to learn activity – to be graded as a quiz – with a partner, have students “Take A Stand” – students choose one of the events from the time line on page 108 and write a paragraph describing how it would create feelings of patriotism and help the colonists think of themselves as “Americans.”

posted on: November 27, 2006

Assignments: November 20 - November 21

Monday:

1. Word Wall with vocabulary terms from Chapters 8, 9 ,10, and 11. Create and share terms and pictures with the class.

Tuesday:

1. Nightmare in Jamestown: video

Wednesday – Friday:
No School!
Have a wonderful Turkey Day!
Enjoy your time off!

posted on: November 17, 2006

Assignments: November 13 - November 17

Monday:

1. Study guide for Chapter 7 test – work on in class – finish for homework – due Tuesday

Tuesday:

1. Go over study guide – quickly
2. Review game to prepare for tomorrow’s test on chapter 7

Wednesday:

1. Chapter 7 test

2. Illustrate Chapter 8 – due Thursday

Thursday:

1. Return test
2. Judge chapter 8 illustrations
3. Picture analysis – Unit 4 – pgs. 102-103
4. KWL Plus Chart – Causes of the Revolutionary War

Friday:

1. Share K and W from KWL Plus Chart
2. Unite or Die political cartoon analysis

posted on: November 13, 2006

Assignments: November 6 - November 10

Monday:

1. Read play on the life of Anne Hutchinson and discuss
2. Continue with “A Day In The Life”
3. Homework: complete #1-15 on 2-column notes

Tuesday:
NO SCHOOL – ELECTION DAY – TEACHER WORKDAY

Wednesday:

1. Go over 2-column notes (#1-15)
2. “A Day In The Life”
3. Class work/homework – Four-Fold Triangular Trade book and #16-22 on 2-column notes

Thursday:

1. Quiz on slave issue(s)
2. Go over 2-column notes (#16-22) and Triangular Trade book
3. “A Day In The Life” – due tomorrow
4. **Let students know that the rest of the 2 column notes (#23-29) can be omitted

Friday:

1. Share and turn in “A Day In The Life”
2. Outline pages 97-101 – finish for homework if not completed in class

posted on: November 06, 2006

Assignments: October 30 - November 3

Monday:

1. Return and go over Map Test
2. Go over Colonial Circle Books
3. Colonial Race: word search with clues

Tuesday:

1. Computer Activity: “Carousel Through Colonial Times”

Wednesday:

1. Senator Rodgers at Mabry to talk to students

Thursday:

1. Continue with computer activity from Tuesday

Friday:

1. Word Scramble
2. “A Day in the Life” Activity
3. Quiz on the occupations of colonists in the three colony regions

posted on: October 30, 2006

Assignments: October 23 - October 27

Monday:

1. Go over Chapter 6 Test
2. Map Activity

Tuesday:

1. Review Maps

2. 13 Colonies Scavenger Hunt with a partner

Wednesday:

1. Review Maps
2. Circle Books of Colonial Contrasts: discuss and glue into notebooks

Thursday:

1. Review Maps
2. Begin 2-Column Notes: #1 - #7
3. “Day in the Life” – written activity with groups – each group will be assigned a different region with a certain socio-economic level. Students will need to include what a person would do on a regular day, ways to make money, where they live(type of house), which colony/city they live in, and so forth.

Friday:

1. Colony Map Test
2. Finish “Day in the Life” Activity

posted on: October 23, 2006

Assignments: October 16 - October 20

***Conference week – shortened classes

Monday:

1. French and Indian War

Tuesday:

1. French and Indian War

Wednesday:

1. Review sheet due – check for completion and go over
2. Play “5 second game” to review for tomorrow’s test

Thursday:

1. Chapter 6 Test
2. Illustrate chapter 7

Friday:

1. Return test
2. Judge illustrations
3. Map activity for chapter 7

posted on: October 16, 2006

Assignments: October 9 - October 13

Monday:
No class – performing arts/movie

Tuesday:
***Have each student write 2 questions to ask the senator tomorrow.

1. Go over Notes Outline – up to #8 (pgs. 76-84)
2. Have students complete chart – comparing the colony under trustee and royal rule – with a partner and discuss with overlay
3. Complete crossword puzzle (on backside of chart comparing trustee vs. royal rule) – finish for homework if not completed in class.

Wednesday:
Georgia Senator here to speak to all students

Thursday: Block Party during 6th and 7th periods

1. Finish going over Notes Outline: pages 76-84.
2. Check crossword puzzle answers.
3. Start chapter review worksheet – due Wednesday, 10/18

Friday:
No school – Teacher Workday

posted on: October 09, 2006

HOMEWORK: NOTES OUTLINE

YOU DO NOT HAVE TO FINISH THE OUTLINE TONIGHT.
PLEASE COMPLETE THE OUTLINE THROUGH SECTION 7.
THANK YOU.

posted on: October 04, 2006

Assignments: October 2 - October 6

Monday:

1. Quickly review reasons to settle Ga.
2. Assign advertisement – Come to Georgia – due Friday
3. Finish outline that was started on Friday.

**Warm-up – Why would people want to leave England and set up a new colony?

Tuesday:

1. Analyze picture and seal on page 75 (what do students see in the picture?, what items are represented by the seal?, etc.)
2. Then read “Comparing Viewpoints” and discuss questions that go with it – why did people “glamorize” life in Georgia? What businesses do this today? Why? (economics)
3. Word wall – split words for chapter 5,6, and 7 – students work in groups of 3 to illustrate the definition of words – these will be hung in room.

**Warm-up – Why do people try to glamorize things that aren’t really so glamorious?

Wednesday:

1. Finish and hang up words for “Word Wall”
2. Have students read pages 76-79 and complete #1 and #2 on outline
3. Problem/solution chart – “What do I (Oglethorpe) do about getting people mad and wanting to leave?”
4. Homework: Read pages 79-80 and finish outline #3-#10

**Warm-up – Why are so many of the colonists angry with Oglethorpe?

Thursday:

1. Check and go over rest of outline, reasons to be upset.
2. Quiz pages 72-76
3. Watch Georgia Stories I, program 4
4. Ad due tomorrow

**Warm-up – What happened in Georgia after Oglethorpe left?

Friday:

1. Share and turn in advertisements
2. Start chapter review sheet – study guide
3. Georgia Stories II, program 3

**Warm-up- What was colonial life like for the early settlers?

posted on: October 02, 2006

Georgia Advertisement Requirements

GEORGIA ADVERTISEMENT


OBJECTIVE:

Create an advertisement for the Georgia colony.
You’re goal is to convince people to come to

Georgia and start a new life.

REQUIREMENTS:

Plain white paper
Colorful
Eye-catching
Reasons to come to the New World
Purposes for settling Georgia
Catchy Slogan
Caption:
o What types of people were wanted?
o Who was not allowed to come to Georgia?

posted on: October 02, 2006

Assignments: September 25 - September 29

Monday:

1. Lecture on Spanish and English race to claim lands in New World – background on their relationship, as far as powers of the world.
2. Anticipation Guide – pages 64-68
3. Study guide – due tomorrow
4. Ch. 5 test on Wednesday.

Tuesday:

1. Finish Anticipation guide from yesterday
2. Review game to prepare for tomorrow’s test

Wednesday:

1. Chapter 5 Test
2. Illustrate chapter 6

**Why was England able to take over in the race for new land in North America?

Thursday:

1. Return test and discuss
2. Judge illustrations from yesterday
3. Picture analysis pages 70-71 – complete and discuss to introduce chapter
4. Ocean travel – overhead – discuss as a class.

**Warm-up – How could ocean travel be dangerous in the 1500’s-1600’s.

Friday:

1. Briefly discuss life in England with debtor’s prison being overcrowded, Oglethorpe’s John Percival, dirty, rats, etc. Tell students that b/c Oglethorpe is high up in Parliament, he has some options as to how to solve this problem: put problem on the board – “What to do with overcrowded jails?” With a partner, the students write the problem on their paper, and come up with 3-4 options to solve the problem, then 2 consequences for each option (one positive and one negative), then make a decision based on what he should do and why. Discuss as class – then discuss what really happened.
2. Start Outline: pages 72-76 (I, II, III – due Monday)

**Essential question for chapter 6: What were the factors that caused England to set up both Georgia as well as the other 12 English colonies?

posted on: September 25, 2006

Assignments: September 18 - September 22

Monday:
CONSTITUTION DAY ACTIVITIES

Tuesday:

1. Warm-up – Why did Columbus sail to America so many times?
2. Columbian Exchange w/Columbus reaches America activity (students are looking at what items were brought to Europe from the New World and vice-versa – both good and bad things – discuss as a class
3. Read letter (transparency) to class written by Columbus as he is making one of his journeys to America and discuss
4. Share facts about Columbus
5. Explain RAFT activity to class – due Friday, 9/22

Wednesday :(EARLY RELEASE)

1. Warm-up – Individually, students will compare the efforts of France, Portugal, and Spain to settle the New World. They need to include the issue with the Line of Demarcation. They can make some sort of 3-way Venn diagram to make the comparison or write a paragraph
2. Hand out study guide for the Chapter 5 Test – this needs to be completed by on Monday, 9/25
3. Continue working on RAFT activity – due on Friday

Thursday:

1. Warm-up – What is the right of first discovery?
2. Finish notes that were started on Tuesday
3. Complete French Locations in the New World – looking at where the French settled and why – discuss as a class

Friday:

1. Warm-up – Why might some countries been willing to go to war to keep their claims on areas in the New World?
2. Finish any activity not completed yesterday
3. Turn in RAFTS – share any from volunteers
4. Have students complete “Anticipation Guide” for pages 64-68 and discuss as a class

posted on: September 20, 2006

Assignments: September 11 - 15

We have ITBS testing this week – Sept. 11-15, and we will see classes every other day.

Monday/Tuesday:

1. Warm-up: Why did it take so long for explorers to reach the New World? - meaning: Why didn’t they try to come here sooner?
2. Share Chapter 5 Illustrations
3. Concept map of the term “EXPLORER” – definition, 3-4 examples, 4-5 characteristics – students do this alone then class discusses (discuss what would make a person want to be an explorer, why only men were explorers, countries racing to the New World, colonization rules developed along the way, etc)
4. Start Explorer chart – Columbus to DeSoto

Wednesday/Thursday:

1. Warm-up – Why did explorers come to the New World? How did they change life for the Native Americans?
2. Start notes – Marco Polo through the Treaty of Tordesillas – students fill in 2-column notes guide as they listen to the lecture.
3. Finish Explorer chart for homework – due next day of class

Friday: SURPRISE

posted on: September 11, 2006

Assignments: September 5 - September 8

Monday:
NO SCHOOL – LABOR DAY HOLIDAY

Tuesday:

1. Briefly discuss how rest of chapter 4 goes into the different Indian time periods – weapon development, foods, where/how they lived, etc.
3. Have students complete Indian Groups chart by reading the chapter and filling in as they go

***Warm-up – Why do we have no school on Labor Day?

Wednesday:

1. Quiz using the Indian Groups worksheet
2. Discuss chart with basic notes on advances in civilization
3. Watch last section of Georgia Stories I – prog. 2 (DeSoto)

***Warm-up – What can you learn about a civilization by the homes that they live in?

Thursday:

1. Chapter 4 vocabulary activity – with a partner, students complete story about the people who lived in prehistoric Georgia
2. Chart test – using the Indian Groups chart, textbook, and any other available resources from home, the students are to answer 3 out of 5 questions that relate to how a society develops into a civilized culture such as we live in today.

***What do you think the Native Americans were thinking when DeSoto and his men landed in the New World?

Friday:

1. Warm-up question – as a quick written activity: Christopher Columbus is often credited with “discovering” America, although the land he discovered was already inhabited. Imagine that you are one of the Native Americans who was living in North America when Columbus arrived. You later learn that he has taken credit for the “discovery” of your home. Write a response to his claim.
2. Return vocabulary activity.
3. Turn in “chart test” from yesterday.
4. Illustrate chapter 5.
5. Notebook check – chapters 3 & 4.

posted on: September 05, 2006

Assignments: August 28 - September 1

Monday:

1. Share weather disaster stories and turn in.
2. “Which doesn’t belong” with a partner – complete and go over

***Warm up question – What type of weather condition is most likely to cause the greatest amount of damage to our state – hurricane or tornado? Why?

Tuesday:

1. Power Point – why do we study history? Add in points about primary vs. secondary sources, inferences, generalizations, etc.
2. Examine some primary sources: John Bank’s diary entry (from textbook), Charlie’s family photo
3. Discuss time – have students form a human time line with the dates on pieces of construction paper, then do the same with the events on the backs of the pieces of construction paper.
4. Classwork/homework: chapter review questions – pg. 41 Reviewing Main Ideas #1-7, Sharpen Your Skills #1

***Warm up question – How is understanding dates like understanding a number line?

Wednesday:

1. Time line activity w/partner – students put a list of dates into numerical order.
2. Illustrate chapter 4: look through the chapter, key words, pictures, basic concepts – then students come up with some sort of picture that illustrates the basic theme of the chapter.

***Warm up question: What is the difference between a primary source and a secondary source?

Thursday:

1. Judge illustrations from yesterday.
2. Briefly discuss the science of archaeology
3. Have students complete activity – A Hole In The Head
4. Classwork/homework: read pages 42-47 and answer Locating Main Ideas pages 46 & 47

***Warm up question: Why is it the 21st century vs. 20th century even though it is 2006?

Friday:
1. Quiz over last night’s reading.

2. Go over ?’s from yesterday.

3. Watch first two sections of Georgia Stories I – prog. 2
***Warm up question: What is the difference between a fossil and an artifact? Which are easier for scientists to distinguish its age?

posted on: August 28, 2006

Assignments: August 21 - 25

Monday:

1. Finish “Setting the Stage” from Friday and go over.
2. Do a basic introduction to Chapter 2 – physiographic regions, weather, natural resources, etc.
3. Have students fill in the 4 maps of Georgia – map test on Friday, 8/25.

Tuesday:

1. Review maps of Georgia – test on Friday
2. Complete graphic organizer on pages 16-22 – the regions

Wednesday:

1. Review Georgia maps to prepare for Friday’s test
2. Pop quiz on the graphic organizer from yesterday
3. Go over the graphic organizer
4. Briefly discuss the remainder of the chapter – barrier islands, weather, etc.
5. Introduce “Weather Disaster Story” activity – partner off students.

Thursday:

1. Review maps to prepare for tomorrow’s test.
2. Continue working on Disaster story with partner – due by Monday.

Friday:

1. Take map test over 4 maps of Georgia
2. Continue on Disaster story – due Monday

***What are the main characteristics of Georgia’s physiographic regions?
and How does Georgia’s climate effect Georgia’s natural resources?

posted on: August 21, 2006

Assignments: August 14 - August 18

Monday:

1. Introduce self (and any other teachers in the classroom) and subject
2. Give out and go over syllabus – note to students that the syllabus needs to be signed by their parents, and that there is an email address request.
3. Give out sheet on how to organize notebook sheet – discuss with students how the notebook is to be organized this year…show example of the correct type of spiral notebook (Meade 3 subject works the best)…let them know that they need to have their notebook by Wednesday so that we can glue the first informational worksheets into it.
4. Explain book cover project – while students are waiting to get their textbooks, have them start creating a new cover for the book – they are to be under the impression that the author has made a request for a new book cover that will be used for the next printing edition of the textbook. The students can look over the contents of the book to get some ideas for their “cover” – the cover they need to create needs to be unique (not like the cover that is already on the book) and need to be informative (needs to give the reader an idea of the book’s content). The cover needs to be colorful (or if the child is truly artistic, they can shade). This will be our first project – it will be due on Friday. Any other words besides the title of the text are optional. Student name and class period need to be placed on the back. Students will be using plain white paper for this project.
5. Distribute textbooks. Students need to sign form with homeroom teacher’s name and book number. The books need to be covered – even though they are not brand new…they need to be taken care of until new adoption is made.

Tuesday:

1. Collect any signed syllabi from students – all of these need to be back by tomorrow so that they can be glued into the notebooks.
2. Have students take the Social Studies pre-test. Explain to the students that they need to take the pre-test seriously. Students will be taking the pre-test on scantrons.
3. After they finish their pre-test, they can get back to work on their “cover.”

Wednesday:

1. Glue in first few couple of notebook materials – syllabus and “I Understand” (go over this sheet – it states basic rules for the class).
2. Review some geographical terms – pose the question – “How would you know what to pack if you were going on a trip knowing only the coordinates of your destination?” – discuss with the class. Have students define on their own the following terms: direction, longitude, latitude, intermediate directions, equator, prime meridian, degree, meridians, parallels, and international date line. Have students share answers with the class – and have them correct definitions as necessary.
3. Discuss when you would need absolute vs. relative location.
4. Practice finding places using an atlas and the white boards. Students will be having a quiz over geographic terms and finding places on a map on Friday.
5. Homework: complete “Location” worksheet

Thursday:

1. Go over the Location worksheet.
2. Practice more for finding places using an atlas.
3. Check progress on “Cover” project – remind students that this is due tomorrow. Continue working on projects.
4. Those that need extra help with longitude and latitude can work on this to prepare for tomorrow’s quiz – remind them that terms will be on it as well.

Friday:

1. Judge pictures – class walks around and selects best picture.
2. Collect cover projects
3. Take quiz on longitude and latitude.
4. As we are moving into chapter 2, have students complete Setting the Stage worksheet with a partner. This worksheet helps the students understand how the study of Georgia uses the five themes of geography – where we are, where we have been, and where we are going.

Essential Question(s): What are the 5 themes of geography and how do they affect your life? How can you apply the concept of absolute and relative location in your life?

posted on: August 16, 2006

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