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Week of May 14

We will be working on our Global Warming Project this week. It is due Monday, May 21!
Here are some more websites you may use.

Global Warming Websites-2.doc

posted on: May 14, 2007

Research Rubric

GW Rubric.doc

posted on: May 10, 2007

Oh the Places You Will Go

The PPT was too large, so here are the links that were imbedded in it.

Domains

Wayback Machine

Site Info

Dihydrogen Monoxide

Tree Octopus

Good Website Example

posted on: May 10, 2007

Global Warming Research Project - Due May 21

Global Warming Final Assignment-7.doc

Documentation

Smart Research

Web Search Strats

posted on: May 10, 2007

Take Home "Test" on Weather

Complete the maps, charts, and graphs given in class.
Write an essay containing your prediction supporting it with data from your packet.
Turn in on April 13.
READ INSTRUCTIONS CAREFULLY!!!

Weather Experts Rubric-1.doc
Weather Test Questions-1.doc

posted on: March 29, 2007

Voyage 2 Project Rubric - Due Tuesday, Feb. 27

oceanography project.doc

posted on: February 23, 2007

Hydrology Assessment

hydrology project.doc

Multiple Choice Part on TUESDAY!

posted on: February 01, 2007

Volcano Cube

VOLCANO CUBE.doc

posted on: December 07, 2006

Rock Project due Nov. 3

ROCKS ROCK.doc You may do this in groups of no more than four. You will have two days of class time to work on project.

posted on: October 27, 2006

Tiny Books due Friday, Nov. 3!

MINERAL & ROCK TINY BOOKS.doc

posted on: October 24, 2006

Walking Through GA Paper

Walking through GA creative writing paper on minerals, rocks, and fossils due Friday, Oct. 20!

posted on: October 02, 2006

The Living Periodic Table - Due Sept. 27

The Living Periodic Table – Project Assignment.doc

posted on: September 11, 2006

Moon Observation Assignment

Remember that your moon observations are due Turesday!!! Scroll down for the original instructions for the ACES8 project. ES8 should follow the instructions on the sheet given to you in class. See below for the rubric.

Moon Observations – ACES8

Category/Point 1 2 3 4
Number of Observations 1-3 4-6 7-8 9-10
Dates 1-3 4-6 7-8 9-10
Times 1-3 4-6 7-8 9-10
Pictures 1-3 4-6 7-8 9-10
Cardinal Directions 1-3 4-6 7-8 9-10
Viewing Locations 1-3 4-6 7-8 9-10

Presentation Little to no effort/creativity (1) Some effort/creativity (2) Average effort/creativity (3) Excellent effort/creativity (4)

Total 28 pts. and up to 10 extra credit points. This is a Category 4 grade!


posted on: February 16, 2006

VOLCANO PROJECT & NOTES

IF YOU ARE UNABLE TO ACCESS THIS FROM THE STUDYGUIDE, SEE BELOW OR DOWNLOAD FOR A BETTER VIEW.
Download file


VOLCANO PROJECTS
1. VOLCANO MODEL
a. VOLCANO MUST BE PLACED ON SOME SORT OF BASE THAT WILL CONTAIN ANY “LAVA” ERUPTED FROM THE VOLCANO.
b. YOU MUST TELL THE TYPE OF VOLCANO, TYPE OF ERUPTION, AND WHAT IT ERUPTS (LAVA, ASH, ETC.) – ALL MUST BE CONSISTENT WITH THE MODEL!!!
c. A REPORT OR STORY MUST ACCOMPANY THE MODEL. DOCUMENT ALL INFORAMTION (-10POINTS IF NOT DOCUMENTED!!!)
2. MAKE A TRAVEL BROCHURE TO THREE DIFFERENT TYPES OF VOLCANOES. INCLUDE THE TYPE OF VOLCANO, TYPE OF ERUPTION (HOW AND WHAT), AND LOCATION OF THE VOLCANOES.
3. PRODUCE A VIDEO NEWSCAST OR DOCUMENTARY ABOUT THE THREE DIFFERENT TYPES OF VOLCANOES, THEIR ERUPTIONS (HOW AND WHAT), AND INCLUDE WORKS CITED.


MODEL RUBRIC
0 10 20
NO ID INCORRECT ID CORRECT ID
NO WORKS CITED INCOMPLETE/INCORRECT WORKS CITED COMPLETE/CORRECT WORKS CITED
NO INFO INCORRECT INFO/BASIC REPORT OR STORY CORRECT INFO/DETAILED REPORT OR STORY
DIAMOND HEAD DIAMOND HEAD RUMBLES MT. ST. HELENS
SLOPPY AVERAGE EXCELLENT
BARELY THERE BASICS PERFECT


BROCHURE OR NEWSCAST RUBRIC
0 10 20
1 VOLCANO TYPE 2 VOLCANO TYPES 3 VOLCANO TYPES
NO INFO INCORRECT/INCOMPLETE/BASIC INFO CORRECT/COMPLETE /DETAILED INFO
NO WORKS CITED INCOMPLETE/INCORRECT WORKS CITED COMPLETE/CORRECT WORKS CITED
SLOPPY OR NO GRAPHICS/PICTURES AVERAGE GRAPHICS/PICTURES EXCELLENT GRAPHICS/PICTURES
NO PRESENTATION POOR PRESENTATION SUPERB PRESENTATION

NOTES


VOLCANOES

· Volcanoes are mountains that are formed of molten rock that is pushed up to the Earth’s surface.
· Volcanic Eruptions- explosive or nonexplosive depending on the type of magma emitted (lava or pyroclastic)
o Explosive – caused by magma with high water content; produces mostly pyroclastic materials – material that forms when magma explodes from a volcano and solidifies in the air. The four types are:
§ Blocks – largest; solid rock blasted from a volcano;
§ Bombs – large blobs that harden in the air;
§ Lapilli – pebble size bits of magma that become solid before hitting the ground, and
§ Ash – tiny glassy slivers formed when volcanic gases expand rapidly and explode.
o Nonexplosive – produces mostly lava; there are four types of lava based on viscosity (a liquid’s resistance to flow) the more silica rich the magma is the higher its viscosity. The four types are:
§ Blocky – high viscosity, flows slowly, cannot travel far from vent, and forms sharp-edged chunks;
§ Aa – slightly lower viscosity and forms brittle crust with sharp edges;
§ Pahoehoe – low viscosity, flows like wax, and forms glassy, wrinkled surface, and
§ Pillow – low viscosity;flows underwater, and forms rounded lumps.
· Volcano Types
o Composite or strato – made of alternating layers of lava and pyroclastic material (explosive/quiet); have broad bases and steep peaks; lava is dark and light; rock type formed is andesite; Mt. Fuji and Vesuvius are examples.
o Shield – quiet, moderate explosions; gently sloping (dome); runny, dark lava; forms basalt, obsidian; Mauna Kea in Hawaii is an example (when measured from its base on the sea floor, it is taller than Mt. Everest).
o Cinder Cone – explosive; eruptions contain some light colored lava but mostly are pyroclastic material; forms scoria, pumice, ryolite, and granite; steep shape; An example is Paricutin in Mexico.

· What are craters and calderas?

posted on: December 01, 2005

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